Sign in to follow this  
PhilipKT

DAVID CARON CELLOS

Recommended Posts

Last July, I bought a David Caron Cello #176... it sounds like the voice of God. I have played several other modern instruments, and quite a few old instruments, but I don't consider myself any kind of expert on any instrument, so I'm not finding fault with any maker, just saying that my Caron is delicious, exquisite, wonderful, and I have no interest in any other cello. My question is this:

There are 56 Caron cellos... I know Terry King owns one, and a local cellist friend owns one(her hubby has a Matsuda. there is no comparison between the two.)

Who owns a David Caron?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know a cellist in the Houston Symphony that owns 2.  Caron is a personal friend of his and both instruments were custom built for him. The last one is an exquisite work of art with a special Hawaiian hardwood diamond patterns inlaid in the back and used for the pegs, nut, end pin holder, and tailpiece, and the diamond pattern was also used in the carving of the scroll and shape of the pegs.   David kept it for a year as an exposition instrument before sending it on to my friend.   Wish I had taken photos.  You will notice his cellos rarely rarely come up for sale. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, DR. S said:

I know a cellist in the Houston Symphony that owns 2.  Caron is a personal friend of his and both instruments were custom built for him. The last one is an exquisite work of art with a special Hawaiian hardwood diamond patterns inlaid in the back and used for the pegs, nut, end pin holder, and tailpiece, and the diamond pattern was also used in the carving of the scroll and shape of the pegs.   David kept it for a year as an exposition instrument before sending it on to my friend.   Wish I had taken photos.  You will notice his cellos rarely rarely come up for sale. 

Thanks for your note. I had completely Forgotten about having posted this comment, but 12 years later I am no less enthusiastic about my instrument. My initial comment turned out to be prophetic because( long story short) i found out many years after the fact that one of my student’s mother had called the sound of my cello “sky voice” or “heavenly voice” and Heaven is where God lives.

so the name of my own cello is “heavenly voice” sounds better in Chinese, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, jacklinks said:

Not sure about cellos, but if you ever see one of his violins come up for sale, please pass the word along. I have no idea what his violin prices were/are though.

I was astonished that one of David’s violins sold in Boston at Skinner, I think, for about $3000 which, is, amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, PhilipKT said:

I was astonished that one of David’s violins sold in Boston at Skinner, I think, for about $3000 which, is, amazing.

Why?
I think most living makers work on the second-hand market would sell for less than the initial purchase price, only a handful of lucky makers can see them sell for more.
Contemporary instruments seem to do badly at auction, worse than anywhere else.

Edit: I'm assuming you feel $3000 is a low price for one.

Edited by Wood Butcher
Clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

Why?
I think most living makers work on the second-hand market would sell for less than the initial purchase price, only a handful of lucky makers can see them sell for more.
Contemporary instruments seem to do badly at auction, worse than anywhere else.

Edit: I'm assuming you feel $3000 is a low price for one.

 Yes that is correct. David seems to be more admired for his viola‘s and his cellos then for his violins, but for a well-made example and excellent condition to sell for so little is very surprising. Someone got a very good deal, or there was some kind of serious damage that Was not identified in the auction listing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it is his cellos that really set him apart. I have played several of his violas and violins and the contemporary instruments I own, by relatively unknown makers are considerably better (not just my opinion.)  I also find his violas physically difficult to play, heavy with a thick neck.  I know one professional who had to replace his Caron viola because of physical problems caused by the instrument.   But still, his cellos are etherial. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.