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FT

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I guess you're not getting a lot of response for a few reasons.

Maybe the question is a little vague or general?

Some people here will certainly have tried or use

bows by good contemporary makers.

Did you want some advice on what to look for?

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One problem with your question, aside from vagueness, is that a bow that works for me or someone else will not necessarily work for you. Bow choice is very individual, depending to some extent on questions of weight, balance, etc., and to some extent on what sort of violin you have. Thus, my telling you that I thought a particular maker's bows were excellent would be almost irrelevant. You also have not told us what your price range is. Your best bet is to go to your local luthier and try a bunch and see what you think, making sure that someone plays your violin with bows that you think you like a lot to see how your violin/bow combination sounds to people listening. Sorry I cannot offer anything more specific, but even if I gave you a list of good modern bowmakers, you would still have to do what I suggested.

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I got my bow as a gift from old friends a month ago. It is a pernambuco bow, made in Germany, $500

(a round number) as told. ( I could return it if I wanted to) I wish I could select it myself in a violin shop. It turned out

just as good. I like it a lot. What do you want to know? ( I have 5 or six bows. They have

different feels. I have two from the group as my favorites. That is I use them more often than others

They all are good)

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I like the Otto Hoyer pernambuco bow I bought a few years ago. #1 It makes my violin sound better than with any other bow I've tried, and, #2 it takes to Spiccato and other 'bouncing bow' techniques beautifully and naturally. It is paired with the one violin I like to play most often.

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FT, I presume what you're asking is how the work of top contemporay bowmakers

compares in quality and performance with older (and more expensive) quality bows?

I presume you are not talking about more commercially produced bows?

If you use the search mechanism here

you will find a number of threads on top contemporary makers

and their bows.

I would guess most people monitoring this board have experience with maybe

a few bows they own or have tried that fall into your category.

If you're lucky someone with a wider experience may respond.

Here's one thread to for starters.

bows

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Ken,

My opinion of Otto Hoyer bows is that they can be a real bargain (not cheap,l of course). He made some wonderful bows, great sound and really great off-string performance. I've played with a couple of violin bows and at least one fine cello bow - any of which I would like to own - but they were all "taken" and likely to appear on the market again only at "estate sales."

There are some bows that playing owners do not sell - and I think these are among them.

The auction prices I have seen are right in there with retail prices of new master-made bows.

Andy

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Andy,

You are indeed correct. My luthier had aquired this bow at an estate sale. He was kind enough to offer it to me when I was in the shop after months of searching, trying to find 'my best bow yet.' There was no doubt, even after a quick try. I will not part with this one.

I hope all is well with you, and thank you for the fine remarks concerning this bow. I don't have much information other than the bow itself, but maybe there is some information about Otto Hoyer online. I'll take a look.

Ken

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Among the very top great modern masters (most of whom are
living) are:

Thomachot, Rolland, Raffin, E. Clement, C. Espey, M. Andersen, P.
Siefried and Keith Peck (d.1998) but they are not cheap either.



If one is looking at affordability as well as status, look at
great younger modern makers, and that list is somewhat
different:



Y.LeCanu, S.Bigot, G.Nehr, Tino Lucke, Daniel Shmidt, I.
Salchow, R.Morrow.



As far as the 'biggest' names, I can only say that judging from
the demand, I cannot have enough bows from LeCanu and Bigot. They
are very HOT indeed.....top players are playing them, and spreading
the news. This goes for Isaac Salchow as well.





Here is a list which I have posted before in a different thread 2
years ago.

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=7444



Here is the full list:

JOHN ANIANO made his earliest bows under the guidance of
 William Salchow and he has worked for bow maker Yung Chin
since early 2002. John¹s modern bows are made using a personal
model inspired by Pajeot and Adam. Prizes: two certificates of
merit (va & vc) VSA 2004.



STEVEN BECKLEY began making bows under tutelage of William Salchow.
He worked for and studied bow making under Boyd Poulsen. He began
making bows full time in 1986 and earned a Journey Man¹s
Degree from AFVBM.



*SYLVAIN BIGOT studied bow making at Mirecourt 1987-1992 and
then worked with Jean-François Raffin in Paris where he was
workshop manager for nine years. Prizes:Concours Etienne Vatelot
Paris 1999.



FRANCK DAGUIN studied and worked with Jean-Frederic Schmitt for
ten years and then with luthier Daniel Scaffi before settling in
Lyon, France. Prizes: mention spéciale Paris 1991; Grand
Prix des Métiers d¹Art Lyon 1992; mention
spéciale Paris 2004.



HUGO GABRIEL studied bow making with his brother, Josef Gabriel
in Erlangen, Germany. He was awarded a certificate of merit (va)
VSA 1994 and certificates of merit (va & vc) VSA 1996. His
cello bows follow the Tourte model.



JOSEF GABRIEL has run his own workshop in Erlangen, Germany,
since 1987. Prizes: silver medal Manchester 1992, a gold medal and
tone award Mittenwald 1993, gold medal (vc) VSA 1996 and silver and
bronze medals (vn & vc) Mittenwald 1997.



THOMAS GERBETH studied with Wolfgang Dürrschmidt and R.
Herbert Leicht and worked with Richard Grünke 1991-1997 before
establishing his own workshop in Vienna. Prizes: gold Manchester
1992, bronze Manchester 1994, 2 gold, 1 silver Mittenwald 1997.



KLAUS GRÜNKE studied with his father, Richard for three
years and with Hans Weisshar in Los Angeles for two years. He won
two gold medals (va & vc) VSA 1980 and a silver medal Kassel
1983 and has judged many international competitions.



RICHARD GRÜNKE studied with Edwin Herrmann and at the
Pfretzschner workshop. He joined the Paesold workshop in 1957 and
in 1975 set up his own business in Bubenreuth. He has been invited
to judge numerous international competitions. In 1996 he formed a
company with his sons, Klaus and Thomas.



THOMAS GRÜNKE studied bow making with his father, and
continues to work alongside his father and brother, Klaus in
Langensendelbach, Germany. He is also an experienced restorer of
valuable antique bows and his new work is profoundly influenced by
the work of Peccatte, Voirin and Sartory.



MARCIN KRUPA trained with Gregor Walbrodt 2001-2002. Prizes:
Certificate of Merit (vn) BVMA London; Certificate of Merit (va)
Paris 2004; Bronze medals (vn & va) Mittenwald 2005.



*YANNICK LE CANU studied with Bernard Millant, Gilles Duhaut and
Eric Grandchamp. Prizes: youngest maker award (va) and mention
spéciale (vn) Paris 1999; certificates of merit (vn &
va) VSA 2002; certificate of merit BVMA London 2004; Gold Medal
(vn) VSA 2004; 2 silver medals (vn & va) and mention
spéciale Paris 2004; 2 Gold Medals (vn) VSA 2006.



TINO LUCKE studied bow making in Markneukirchen and then worked
for Hieronymus Köstler in Stuttgart. He now runs a workshop in
Berlin. Prizes: bronze (vc) and silver (vn) Paris 1999; gold (vn)
BVMA 2004.



MICHAEL MAURUSHAT trained as a goldsmith in Alberta, Canada and
studied bow making with Roy Quade and at the Oberlin bow making
workshop 2001. Prizes: certificate for outstanding playing
characteristics, BVMA London 2004.



ANDREW MCGILL trained and worked with the ex-W.E Hill & Sons
bow maker, John Clutterbuck. He is now based in Banbury, Oxford and
is particularly inspired by the work of Tourte and Pajeot.



*GILLES NEHR studied bow making with his cousin, Jean-Pascal
Nehr in Marseille and then worked with Stephane Muller in Toulouse
and Rene Morel in New York. He ran workshops in New York
(1999-2002) Lisbon (2002-2004) and is now established in Rome.
Prizes: Certificate of Merit Craftsmanship BVMA London.



JEAN-PASCAL NEHR, 'Meilleur Ouvrier de France', studied with
Bernard Ouchard at Mirecourt and now works in Marseille, France.
Prizes: Certificate of merit for workmanship Manchester 2001.



PIERRE NEHR studied bow making with his brother, Jean-Pascal
Nehr 1995-1998 and then studied restoration 1998-2000. He worked
with Gilles Chancereul in Paris 2000-2002 and now works in
Marseille.



ROBERT PIERCE was apprenticed to William Hofmann and also trained
with John Clutterbuck and William Salchow. He worked with Pierre
Guillaume for 10 years and established an independent workshop in
Brussels in 1998. He is an elected member of Groupe des Luthiers et
Archetiers d¹Art de France. Prizes: best playing bow
Manchester on two consecutive occasions.



ROY QUADE trained with William Salchow in New York. His bows
have won an unprecedented four gold medals (vn VSA 1996; va &
vc VSA 1998; va VSA 2004) a silver medal BVMA London and fifteen
merit awards at competitions in the USA and the UK.



BENOÎT ROLLAND studied at Mirecourt with Bernard Ouchard.
He has received numerous international prizes for his pernambuco
bows and also patented a carbon fibre bow which won the Musicora
prize in 1994.



WOLFGANG ROMBERG studied bow making with Derek Wilson and Thomas
Gerbeth and he has run his own shop in Munich, Germany, since
1999.



*ISAAC SALCHOW studied with his grandfather, William Salchow and
now works with Salchow & Sons. His bows are close copies of
originals by Tourte, Persoit and Pajeot.



STEPHEN SALCHOW was taught by his father, William Salchow and
his nephew Isaac. He is currently making close copies of bows by
Peccatte and Pajeot.



WILLIAM SALCHOW first studied bow making and repair under Simone
Sacconi in New York and then at Mirecourt with Georges Barjonnet.
He opened his own New York studio in 1960 where he has been making
bows and inspiring bow makers ever since.



DAVID SAMUELS studied bowmaking with Stéphane Thomachot,
and worked for Etienne Vatelot, Amnon Weinstein, Rene Morel and
Jacques Français. Prizes: gold (vc) VSA 1992, gold (vn, va
& vc) VSA 1994, gold Manchester 1994, and gold (vn, va &
vc) VSA 1996. David has since has served on the juries of the VSA
and City of Paris competitions.



JEAN-LUC TAUZIÈDE studied bow making with
Jean-François Raffin and Stéphane Thomachot before
setting up his own workshop in Anglet, France.



DAVID TEMPEST has been a professional viola player all his
working life and has also been making bows for the last eighteen
years. His cello bows are influenced by the work of Sartory.



GEORGES TEPHO works in Quimper, France. Prizes: gold (vc) VSA
1994, two certificates of workmanship VSA 1994 and bronze
Mittenwald, 1991.



STEPHANE MULLER studied with Bernard Ouchard at Mirecourt and
after travelling in Brazil to improve his knowledge of pernambuco,
he established a workshop in Toulouse, France in 1984. Prizes:
bronze (viola) Paris1999.



GREGOR WALBRODT trained with Jean-Marc Panhaleux and
Stéphane Thomachot in France. Awards include: gold (vn) VSA
1996; two gold medals Mittenwald 1997; gold (va) VSA 1998;
certificates of merit Manchester 1996 and 1998; two gold medals (vc
& vn) VSA 2000 and bronze Manchester 2001.



JUTTA WALCHER was an apprentice with Garner Wilson and then
worked with Matthew Coltman. Since 1995 her mentor has been bow
maker Peter Oxley. Prizes: bronze Manchester 1998 and fourth prize
(va) Paris 1999.



CHRISTIAN WANKA studied bow making for 3 years with his father
and worked in Toronto before returning to work in the family
workshop in Baiersdorf, Germany.



HERBERT WANKA studied bow making at Bubenreuth 1952-55 and
worked for Gotthard Schuster for many years before setting up his
own workshop in 1971. He now works in Baiersdorf, Germany.



*MATTHEW WEHLING studied bow making with William Salchow,
Benoît Rolland and Georges Tepho, with whom he worked as
assistant for 5 years. He now works in Minneapolis, USA. Prizes:
Gold medals (vn & vc) VSA 2002 and certificate of merit (va)
VSA 2002.



RICHARD WILSON was an apprentice of Garner Wilson and then
established his own workshop in Cambridge where he makes, repairs
and restores bows.



ROGER ZABINSKI studied with Vaido Radamus, Martin Beilke,
William Salchow. He was elected a member of the AFVBM in 1985.
Awards include: gold (vn) VSA; numerous certificates of merit from
the VSA.









You may also want to check out some fascinating discussions on this
subject @:



1. "Shopping for contemporary bow-Can anyone give me a
suggestion of contemporary bows I can purchase for
$3000-4000?” (6/17/2005)

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=7103



2. "I'm looking around for a new violin bow, and am thinking of
commissioning one from a modern maker." (8/14/2005)

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=7444



3. “Contemporary bow makers-Who are some of the best
contemporary bow makers and how much do their bows cost?”
(6/4/2006)

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=9221



4. “Looking for a great modern bow-Does anyone have any
experience with great modern bows? Has anyone played some of the
makers that I want to look into?” (2/27/2007)

http://www.violinist.com/discussion/response.cfm?ID=10792







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I have discussed N.Burke and his disciple G.Leahy on another site v.com, where I have explained that unless one appreciates the qualities of a fine Pajeot bow, their work can be misunderstood and not appreciated.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
4fiddlinkids

Has anyone played bows by, or have info on, Michael Taylor? He is from UK and was with Ealing for some time.

My husband has one, a Peccatte model. Worth trying if you're looking for a contemporary bow. We have one friend who played through the bow collection and liked the Taylor better than all the vintage French bows.

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M.Taylor  may be fine for some, but for the "discriminating"

string player today, there are award winning makers making truly

remarkable bows of a whole different class.

Personally, I rarely  find  a Hill bow that I like. But

that's just me.

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You appear to relate who makes great bows by how many awards they have won.This very rarely means the playability will be on the same level.

Just an observation of your list.Ive seen very poor playing bows from a few makers on your list.

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I do not relate master bowmakers by how many awards they have

won.

I am speaking from a vast experience as a collector of fine bows

(old & new), as well as a player (1st violinist of odenquartet,

and member of Seattle Symphony Orchestra).

It so happens that some of my favorite bowmakers are garnering or

have garnered top prizes around the globe.

One of my favorite bow makers was Keith Peck, who never entered any

competitions yet was respected by players and experts alike.

 www.keithpeck.com

http://www.stringsmagazine.com/instruments...AmberBow65.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Peck

The other issue is that I guess you missed what I stated: "Among

the very top great modern masters (most of whom are living)

are:Thomachot, Rolland, Raffin, E. Clement, C. Espey, M. Andersen,

P. Siefried and Keith Peck (d.1998) but they are not cheap

either.

If one is looking at affordability as well as status, look at great

younger modern makers, and that list is somewhat

different:Y.LeCanu, S.Bigot, G.Nehr, Tino Lucke, Daniel Shmidt, I.

Salchow, R.Morrow.As far as the 'biggest' names, I can only say

that judging from the demand, I cannot have enough bows from LeCanu

and Bigot. They are very HOT indeed.....top players are playing

them, and spreading the news. This goes for Isaac Salchow as

well."

Isaac Salchow (who has never entered any competitions) is very much

admired by many professionals including H.Hahn (who plays his bow)

and Jaime Laredo (who plays his bow).

As for comparing old bows like Otto Hoyer, he was a fine maker

following the basic design of Sartory.

Paul Weihaas was also a very fine maker following the example of

 his mentor V. Fetique.

The are very fine bows for those who like that model and design of

 bow.

But today there are makers who enjoy making bows in the classic

style of the great 19th century makers like Tourte, Pajeot,

Persoit,Peccatte,  Grand Adam, Simone etc.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Gennady Filimonov
I do not

relate master bowmakers by how many awards they have won. I am

speaking from a vast experience as a collector of fine bows (old

& new), as well as a player (1st violinist of odenquartet, and

member of Seattle Symphony Orchestra). It so happens that some of

my favorite bowmakers are garnering or have garnered top prizes

around the globe. One of my favorite bow makers was Keith Peck, who

never entered any competitions yet was respected by players and

experts alike.  www.keithpeck.com

The other issue is that I

guess you missed what I stated: "Among the very top great modern

masters (most of whom are living) are:Thomachot, Rolland, Raffin,

E. Clement, C. Espey, M. Andersen, P. Siefried and Keith Peck

(d.1998) but they are not cheap either. If one is looking at

affordability as well as status, look at great younger modern

makers, and that list is somewhat different:Y.LeCanu, S.Bigot,

G.Nehr, Tino Lucke, Daniel Shmidt, I. Salchow, R.Morrow.As far as

the 'biggest' names, I can only say that judging from the demand, I

cannot have enough bows from LeCanu and Bigot. They are very HOT

indeed.....top players are playing them, and spreading the news.

This goes for Isaac Salchow as well." Isaac Salchow (who has never

entered any competitions) is very much admired by many

professionals including H.Hahn (who plays his bow) and Jaime Laredo

(who plays his bow). As for comparing old bows like Otto Hoyer, he

was a fine maker following the basic design of Sartory. Paul

Weihaas was also a very fine maker following the example of

 his mentor V. Fetique. They are very fine bows for those who

like that model and design of  bow. But today there are makers

who enjoy making bows in the classic style of the great 19th

century makers like Tourte, Pajeot, Persoit,Peccatte,  Grand

Adam, Simone etc.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Gennady Filimonov

M.Taylor may be fine for some, but for the "discriminating"

string player today, there are award winning makers making truly

remarkable bows of a whole different class.


Ah, well. Perhaps someday my husband will rise to the level of a "discriminating" player.

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Point taken i am not disagreeing with what you say,but you are also acting as an agent for some of these makers which always conflicts with advice given .I collect older French bows myself and deal in them.I do not like promotion on here ,which is in a way what you are doing.

How many of the makers you mention are using some sort of mechanical process in their building? Many do at least for the frogs.Are these going to be as collectable in the future , as say Rolland who does everything by hand??

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quote:


Originally posted by:
fiddlecollector
Point taken

i am not disagreeing with what you say,but you are also acting as

an agent for some of these makers which always conflicts with

advice given .I collect older French bows myself and deal in them.I

do not like promotion on here ,which is in a way what you are

doing. How many of the makers you mention are using some sort of

mechanical process in their building? Many do at least for the

frogs.Are these going to be as collectable in the future , as say

Rolland who does everything by hand??

I am also a collector of Fine French bows (old). My collection

includes a fine D. Peccatte, Maline, Voirin etc.

I choose makers for the sound, playability and investment

potential.

The makers I have chosen to represent happen to be the hottest

French Makers today, and very collectable.

They make everything by hand. And the rest of the best makers that

I have mentioned do so as well.

I offer an objective advice.

I have no connections to the rest of the people on my list.

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I just spoke to David Samuels on the telephone today. He is in the country for the Oberlin Workshop. David is a very old fiend of mine, I went to High School with him and is brother and sister at IAA. Our teacher Mr. Holland has a bow David. made for him in Ebony and Gold, it is his favorite. David and I played in the viola section together and I have many great memories of him and our section (he was a much better player than me).

Best,

Dwight

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Gennady Filimonov

M.Taylor  may be fine for some, but for the "discriminating"

string player today, there are award winning makers making truly

remarkable bows of a whole different class.

Personally, I rarely  find  a Hill bow that I like. But

that's just me.


I think it's important to not that there are two makers that can be called "M. Taylor". Michael J. Taylor and Malcolm Taylor. I think the maker that was brought up was Michael J Taylor. One player I know who found his bows quite useful is Jose Luis Garcia (ex concert master of the English Chamber Orchestra)... A relatively discriminating player, I think.

As far as Hill bows go, they are popular for good reason. Many players like them. One notable player who used them pretty much exclusively was Fritz Kreisler. Many players today have a nice Hill in their case sitting alongside their more expensive bows. Many tell me "Well, it doesn't really play like a Hill". I usually think "What does a Hill play like then?". Funny thing; Same thing happens with some Vuillaume violin owners. I hear, "It doesn't really sound like a Vuillaume." I seem to hear that often... (To your credit, I've never heard that from you, Gennady. You seem to know that some Vuillaumes sound like... well... really nice Vuillaumes!)

I agree, however, that bows, like instruments, have a predictable pattern (when it comes to present and future demand for the maker's bows). Those who pay attention to the best of the classic bows, in terms of design and workmanship, while still allowing a controlled sense of "self" to come through tend to produce bows that players want to own. Your list, while maybe not fully complete, is a good one... and many of the makers I like are present on it.

I'd add Douglas Raguse and Pierre-Yves Fuchs for starters.

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