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C.B.Fiddler

Not sure, know nothin' - $375,000

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Hi Jeffrey,

I find it fun to browse and see what is flying around ebay.

You're right, I shouldn't be surprised - but such ridiculousness goes past amusing into just plain annoying!

I actually was able to purchase my current violin via ebay - made by the luthier I have discussed with you in the past. But the seller was kind enough to send it to me first before requiring payment so I had the opportunity to show it to Mr. Kimble first. I bought it and paid 1/3 less than if I had bought it from Kimble.

I have since regarded this as a rare, singular ebay occasion.

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This quote by Einstein seems to fit here: "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe."

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but, Jeffrey, it´s not "ebay". it ´s of course an ebay auction and a pretty bizarre one (and yes, BS like this can only happen there), but it is NOT ebay in terms of generalization of auction styles of any kind. for instance just yesterday i started offering a modern Italian violin in the few thousand $$ range on ebay Germany and have already received a considerable "best offer" price only a few hours later. so that is also ebay. there is a floor not only for BS, but for serious deals as well.

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Aw come on guys-you missed a real winner here. This is a rare

violino transverso-in fact the only one that Strad ever built-take

a second look at the chin rest

FS

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Gee, you guys are harsh. I'm in Denver. I might just email the guy and go over there. Won't you all be green with envy when it turns out to be a real Strad and I get it for just $375,000. And I bet the bow is stamped 'Tourte' too....

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I think it is important to know where the "Strad" is from. It has a mystery of origin that

was from a car trunk. Who put it there? Who was the owner? Why the seller did not bother to

find out? The seller probably knows all the answers already. What do you think?

PS. I am trying to be objective. Chicago Tribune had a story a few years ago, that some guy

found a viola on the Michigan Ave in Chicago,, on the sidewalk. He thought it was a garbage.That event landed him in jail for 10 days,

the appraiser was rewarded of $10,000 for reporting it to police. He thought it was a valueable instrument that was stolen .It was a comic story. Who was a good guy

or bad guy? It all depends on whose testimony the judge believed.

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Wow, what an amazing instrument. I wonder if those fine tuners are original... Maybe the question should be asked? hehe *sarcastic smiley*

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This guy appears to be emulating ISOC.

Note: An explanation for post-ISOC members: ISOC stands for "In Search of Cremona", which was the on-screen handle of an Alabamian who used to post some mighty big claims on Maestronet about his fiddles. He was finding an original Strad or Del Gesu every couple of months or so. He once had an "original" Del Gesu for sale on Ebay for $4,500,000.00, if memory serves.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
matzstudio

but, Jeffrey, it´s not "ebay". it ´s of course an ebay auction and a pretty bizarre one (and yes, BS like this can only happen there), but it is NOT ebay in terms of generalization of auction styles of any kind. for instance just yesterday i started offering a modern Italian violin in the few thousand $$ range on ebay Germany and have already received a considerable "best offer" price only a few hours later. so that is also ebay. there is a floor not only for BS, but for serious deals as well.


Hey, if buying or selling on ebay lights up your day... and if you do well, great! I think you'd have to admit that the difference between you and a buyer/seller with less experience may be that you know how to spot the minefields, however.

BUT:

I'd say, it absolutely IS ebay as far as violins are concerned... In my opinion, ebay is a very unregulated, very undignified sales venue... and tall, unrealistic, and often deceiving claims abound. All one has to do to confirm that is browse through a page of listings.

That's not to say that a decent deal doesn't go down now and then... or that there aren't some good selling agents or serious buyers... but I will say, NO ebay instrument deal has ever gone down with me as a buyer or a seller, and it's not likely to. (My wife did buy a saddle there, however...) If someone wants to sell an instrument to me, they'll need to look me up and stand toe to toe with me (or at least communicate in a direct manner). If they want to purchase something from me, same deal.

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agreed, Jeffrey. eBay has many sides, and is very anarchic in many ways. anyone can sell whatever and however they want to. that is the bad side of the coin. i don´t even want to know how many illegal transactions take place there (stolen goods, faked goods, no goods at all). i have heard about stolen violins which were sold on eBay (happened here in Berlin). that said i honestly find it quite amazing the venue has not been closed down by authorities so far. maybe it´s already way too big for that.

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Sorry I'm so late on this,

three questions jump to mind, (1) Is it genuine?

(2)

Who made it?

(3)

Why is the seller listing it this way?

# 1Is it genuine? No of course not.  It is stated that there

is a stamp in the wood, not a label .

The master used labels, he did not  stamp  his

brand. At this period 1713 _1720  the labels would

have been preprinted with the first 2 number 17_ _ leaving the

decimal  and ones place  to be filled in by hand.

Stradivari wrote in the decimal place one, as a straight vertical

line with  a dot over top , as in an apothicary notation,

(i), and a three or a nine , this looks like a nine to me.

So there for this is  not a genuine stradivari , we kenw

that.

#2 Who made it . Some one trying to pass off a forgery ? No,

 not a forgery but a copy or a duplicant  of a

Stradivarius , as was the vogue in the 1890 -1920

 manufactured and clearly marked as a Stradivarius in a

 manner that would clearly indicate to everyone it is only an

attempt is to copy the master. These were massed

produced .

#3 Why is the seller listing it this way?

 There is a charge to list. It is

costing him something.

 Everyone with just the basic

knowledge knowsthat  this is not by  the masters

hand.

Therefore  I propose this is a method

to generate interest in a credit offer( no payment for three months

with Paypal plus credit card)

Just my thoughts.  Carl

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Violins may be a particularly difficult commodity on ebay. I have to say that I've bought many musical instruments off the bay, and seldom been burned. In fact, ebay is THE site for the purchase of fine Italian mandolins; it's nearly impossible to find good old Embergher instruments anywhere else, and they realise top dollar. For instruments like this, ebay is one of the few places where an international clientele can be attracted and top instruments sold at respectable prices.

On the other hand, it's uncommon for concert-quality mandolins to bring more than $4-6K, and many can be found for half that, so the greed/fraud mix is not so volatile, and idiot sellers are easily identified and avoided.

I've bought 3 violas and 3 violins thru ebay. I was burned to some degree on one of the violas, and possible overpaid a bit on one violin; as for the rest, they were either fairly priced or bargains. Not too bad a record all in all, for a venue where the only methods of evaluation are small photos and email.

I readily admit it would be more satisfactory to handle the goods beforehand, but that would mean trips to NYC or beyond, stiff competition and higher prices. And of course some ebay sellers will permit returns with a guarantee of satisfaction, which pretty much eliminates the risk, though of course it draws more bidders as well, so the tradeoff tends toward a higher closing bid.

I will admit to a history of risk-taking behavior, but in an auction I only stand to lose some money. Now I'm getting too old for the kind of thing where I could end up damaged physically, or dead, so all in all it doesn't seem that big a deal to come up with the occasional dog.

Of course the auction in question is way over the top, but no one with any brains would be bidding anyway. The seller seems to have been buying bulk lots of tanning products, and has presumably spent far too much time baking in the sun, which may explain some things. More to be pitied than censured, I'd say; and of course he's offered us an unparalleled opportunity to rag on him for our amusement, so all in all just a bit of harmless fun.

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I can do a lot of things if I have $375,000 at my disposal. Why anyone in

the right mind would buy a violin, unseen, non-played by anyone you know, the seller admits that he knows next to nothing about that violin?

If it is $500 that may be okay, just for the fun of it. I think $375,000 is set out for a killing, if

it is serious. Someone pretended to be innocent.

If some one buught it for $5,000 I won't shed tears for the buyer, neither. It is like

hand out money on his free will. He may be thinking that someone can use his money better.

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"At this period 1713 _1720 the labels would have been preprinted with the first 2 number 17_ _ leaving the decimal and ones place to be filled in by hand."

Not true, according to the labels pictured in the Hill Stradivari book. The text says: "As 1700 approached, .... He also decided to print henceforth only the figure 1, adding the remaining three figures with his pen; and from this rule he never again deviated, if we except his repairing label."

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What's particularly puzzling or amusing is the photo of the label, which seems to be taken from an article entitled "So, You Found a Stradivarius Violin!," most likely explaining how cheap factory violins with a fake Strad label turn up all the time.

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"My wife did buy a saddle there, however..."

Jeffrey, your wife actually bought a saddle without trying it on

her horse first?  If so, she must have an easy horse to fit,

or just got lucky.  I would never have  been so lucky as

to buy a saddle for my horse on Ebay and have it fit.

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