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How to training a kid to be more musical?


uid6001
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What do you mean by being "musical"? How old is your daughter? Does she already have personal tastes in music of her own? Does she tend to delight in things she hears or sees? I have two children. When we attended the Nutcracker Suite when they were preschoolers, one described what he heard, while the other went on about the scenery and colours. One will graduate as a musician, and the other will graduate in a career that combines technology and the visual arts. Exposure in itself did not determine the direction they took. That part seems to be in part inborn, and we draw out and nurture it.

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What do you mean by being "musical"? How old is your daughter? Does she already have personal tastes in music of her own? Does she tend to delight in things she hears or sees

She is at 11. She can master most technics with some practice, but she seem to play the notes not the music.

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For some people, joining a group that makes music together is a big help - if they can already play the instrument. The comrardery, competition, and the insights of the dirrector can often lauch a stalled "musical career."

Knowing other kids who do the same thing was a big inspiration for me, and one I did not have during my earlier playing years (from 4 - 12).

Andy

P. S. Let me add to this in editing, since my response was specificly addressed to someone who would be in late elementary or miiddle school. All of my 3 grandchildren are musical, two because they were introduced to music at very young ages and have continued to have it as a major aspect of their lives. My grandson was obviously musical from the earliest times, he responded to and reproduced sounds he heard whether they were birds, machines, bugs, or musical instruments notes and songs - everhtying - whatever! This led naturally into music and that (including composing songs and singing - along with playing on almost anything that comes into his hands) and (now) surfing, are really all consuming in this 14-year old's life.

There are music/parents activities in and near many cities that start music appreciation and music making for children as soon as they are out of diapers. This was how one of my granddaughters got started before moving on to ballet, piano, singing lessons, and now in her 6th years with the SF Girl's Chorus.

The other granddaughter started piano at age 5 and later violin lessons with me at age 6 - she is off to college this fall and still plays violin - and is a wonderful singer too.

I think exposure to music is the critical element. Special talents are an additional bonus that will then haved an opportunity to develop.

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Originally posted by:
Andrew Victor

For some people, joining a group that makes music together is a big help - if they can already play the instrument. The comrardery, competition, and the insights of the dirrector can often lauch a stalled "musical career."

Knowing other kids who do the same thing was a big inspiration for me, and one I did not have during my earlier playing years (from 4 - 12).

Andy

I agree. Although I don't like orchestra playing, I still like the opportunity it gives me to interact with other musicians to "see what they got"

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Strongly second the group suggestion. Expe4rience with my granddaughter bears it out in spades.

She was a more or less typical student, when her teacher had to leave town for a month or so. Found a local teacher who was heavily into ethnomusicology, who started the kid on some Celtic stuff. Nicely melodic and pretty easy. Next step was to have her memorise a handful of these pieces; then the kid went o a local kids' session in an Irish pub. THe place was crawling with kidfiddlers, from 7-16 years of age, all of whom were familiar woth the repertoire. We got home after the first session, she pulled the tape off her fingerboard (NONE of the other kids had tape, you see) and plunged into memorising the rest of the session book, started practicing without being reminded, and her playing and interest just took off.

I don't know if it was the music, the group, the competitiveness, or what, but the spark ignited some fumes in her head, apparently.

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Thank everyone for their response.

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Originally posted by:
Bob A

She was a more or less typical student, when her teacher had to leave town for a month or so. Found a local teacher who was heavily into ethnomusicology, who started the kid on some Celtic stuff. Nicely melodic and pretty easy. Next step was to have her memorise a handful of these pieces; then the kid went o a local kids' session in an Irish pub. THe place was crawling with kidfiddlers, from 7-16 years of age, all of whom were familiar woth the repertoire. We got home after the first session, she pulled the tape off her fingerboard (NONE of the other kids had tape, you see) and plunged into memorising the rest of the session book, started practicing without being reminded, and her playing and interest just took off.


I am hoping the same miracle will happen.

quote:


DOES SHE HAVE MANY OPPORTUNITIES TO SING? DO YOU? DOES SHE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THEM? DO YOU?

She don't sing, and she is proud to be NOT part of the school choir. She seems to inheret the gene from her mom, who just don't sing.

quote:


For some people, joining a group that makes music together is a big help - if they can already play the instrument. The comrardery, competition, and the insights of the dirrector can often lauch a stalled "musical career."

To get her to group play, we had her audition for a string orchestra. Now she is in the orchestra. I sense that she seems to enjoy the comradery and do well in competition. But the quality of the orchestra is not very high.

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Hey Dean,

Don't worry just yet if it sounds like she's only playing the notes. String-along is right when she says playing is a very physical thing. Until control of the muscles can be made mostly subconscious it's pretty difficult to have coherent musical thought. The most important thing (other than practicing) for developing musicality is listening to recordings/attending concerts or/and studying scores.

Sorry if I'm sounding incoherent, doing bowings for my Bach has been pretty mindbending. I would like to say (and perhaps I've said it before here) Bach would've been an unbelievable jazz organist.

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