Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

fakes


slowpoke
 Share

Recommended Posts

Almost all of them. "Labeled" is ebay speak for fake label. The seller isn't claiming that the violin was made by the labeled maker but only that the violin is labeled with that name. Fake labels have a long tradition in the violin selling business. There are exceptions but assuming the label is fake is a good place to start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on what sort of violins you're talking about. Recently made violins with labels like Skylark, Samuel Eastman, Rudolf Doetsch, John Juzek, etc., can generally be believed. Most violins with American labels are legitimate. But if you're talking about violins older than 50 years, or so, with labels dated from the 1500s to the mid 1800s indicating European origin, I'd guess that over 99 percent are fake.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mostly they're just labeled as fakes but bear little resemblance to the real thing. Brad has it right but there's thread below about a Markneukirchen student violin that a fraudster is trying to pass off as American with a nice freshly inserted fake label. The ebay creative sellers notice when some particular kind of violin brings a good price and oblige with an appropriate label and sales pitch for the gullible.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Manufactured as fakes or relabeled as fakes?"

I'd guess mostly the former, but "manufactured as fakes" is not exactly the right way to put it, because most of these violins were not made with the intention of deceiving anyone. The person who put the Strad (or Guarneri, Amati, Stainer, Maggini, etc.) label in the violin never expected anyone to actually believe that it was a real Strad. The label was inserted in the hope that some of the aura of the famous maker would allow the violin to sell for another dollar or two.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slowpoke - The three volumes of "Violin Identification and Price Guide" by Roy Ehrhardt are full of adds like the one you cite. While the "price guide" part is a stretch, they give a wonderful overview of the period of time where you had to have a musical instrument in the house if you wanted to have music--before radios and victrolas were commonplace. If you couldn't afford a piano, you bought a German or French trade violin from Sears or Monkey Wards or J.W. Pepper or somebody.

And there are some really nice trade violins to be found, maybe made by one good maker working in the factory using matching wood for the scroll, ribs, and back. Of course, you may find one with the same label, from the same store, that was made in an entirely different factory in Mirecourt or Mittenwald that is not nearly as good.

My take is that 90% of labels are authentic as Brad says. But the most interesting ones are the remaining 10% and were placed there with the intent to deceive. This is especially easy to do on ebay, where you can't really see the instrument. Coupled with poor photographs it's caveat emptor with a vengeance. There is a seller or sellers from one particular area of the US who have been selling fraudulently stamped bows for years on ebay. They are stamped (poorly) as if from the best past makers, but they never bring much money anymore. Fortunately, they are easy to spot and avoid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...