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GMM22

Composition of peg compound?

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The Knilling Perfection Pegs are standard on many of my 5-string fiddles, and I install quite a few on other instruments. I've had no problems at all with them, and only one customer who just didn't like them. If you take off the mold lines before installation and blend in the texture, they look a lot better. Pegheds are great, if you want nicer heads. Personally, I didn't like the slow tuning and "notchiness" of the Wittner pegs, but I understand if people with deficient discrimination disagree with me. :D

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I use pegheads , with just one drop of super glue to hold them . I polished up the heads and no-one can tell they are not ebony.

Sure , some top end players won't like them , and I would never install them into an antique instrument.

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I use pegheads , with just one drop of super glue to hold them . I polished up the heads and no-one can tell they are not ebony.

Sure , some top end players won't like them , and I would never install them into an antique instrument.

how do you polish them?

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I use pegheads , with just one drop of super glue to hold them . I polished up the heads and no-one can tell they are not ebony.

Sure , some top end players won't like them , and I would never install them into an antique instrument.

OK, but why not? What prevents you? How can they be improved?

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Here we are in the 21st Century - well some of us are - and we are talking about a truly medieval system, namely friction pegs.

Mike

Um, gut strings are also Medieval. Some people like those. ;)

Young kids don’t like trad pegs? They don’t like homework or broccoli either. :lol:

Honestly, the last time I had a peg slip, it was with a new string... it unwound all the way and the peg dropped on the floor. I was laughing too hard to be annoyed.

Addie, who uses Hill’s. I’m OK with that.

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...When I show young people my violins I get requests for mechanical fine tuners on ALL strings because they cannot handle friction pegs...
...I'm happy to install PegHeds on an instrument, if the customer requests it...

Michael and David -- Do you charge extra for the mechanical pegs?

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OK, but why not? What prevents you? How can they be improved?

The only reason I wouldn't install on an antique instrument is because it is not traditional.

I don't know if anyone has explained that you can even change stiffness of turning by pushing head in as you turn.

Chuck is a bloody Genius ( Australian for very clever man )

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I use Naptha soap, from the laundry aisle-- holds up against moisture better.

I think that's what we used at the very first place I worked. Fels Naptha soap, ground up, mixed with powdered rosin and a tiny bit of water, and pressed into a stick. As I recall, it worked quite well, even on pegs which didn't fit very well. Might need to pick some up and try it again. Ivory soap was just what I happened to have around, because I use it as a lubricant on plane soles and cutting tools.

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ive used mexican bar soap because im assuming its closer to the old fashioned way of making soap that was used years ago, without added moisturizers, oils, etc

if your going to use an abrasive like chalk to make the pegs grip, turn slower and not slip, ive found jewelers rouge(with soap) to be a good substitute for chalk(used with soap) according to some people rouge is the main component in many commercial peg compounds

ps i dont see any reason rouge wouldnt work with beeswax instead of soap, either....

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I have a couple large metal cans filled with bars of home-made soap, probably 50 or more years old, at least. It's sort of grey, If I recall correctly, made by my wife's late grandmother, and stored in her barn. (Gray because it was doubtless cooked up with wood ash to saponify the fat, and not filtered. Tis is the real stuff, made the way it was done for millenia. Stradivari might have used it. (Did people wash themselves, back then?)).

It reminds me of some unscented olive oil soap I got from Lebanon a while back, at least in appearance. I haven't washed with it.

If there's any interest, feel free to PM me with an address and I'll send you a cake. Of soap, that is. Feel free to send me a violin or something, if you wish, in return.

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ive used mexican bar soap because im assuming its closer to the old fashioned way of making soap that was used years ago, without added moisturizers, oils, etc

That's why I use Ivory soap around the shop. No moisturizers, oat meal, cleansing cream, defoliants, eye of newt, or powdered rock.

Doesn't Mexican soap contain guacamole, hot sauce, and ground-up taco shells? :unsure:

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....Bee wax and rosin perhaps, simple and elegant.

Edit: In reviewing this thread, I see Captain Hook made mention of bee wax too, although I think it needs something more to prevent the creeping that was also mentioned. Staying away from abrasives, rosin seems the most logical thing for the second component.

what about beeswax and propolis... both are non hygroscopic, non abrasive, antimicrobial and natural with a pleasant odor. Propolis has a grippy texture in its natural form. As far as I know beeswax behaves very differently from parafin wax and I doubt it would seep into the wood hardly at all. I don't have any propolis, so maybe someone who uses propolis for finishing, can try it & let us know how it works?

I tried beeswax & rosin softened with a bit of xylene tonight... worked not too bad.

Cheers, Mat

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what about beeswax and propolis... both are non hygroscopic, non abrasive, antimicrobial and natural with a pleasant odor. Propolis has a grippy texture in its natural form. As far as I know beeswax behaves very differently from parafin wax and I doubt it would seep into the wood hardly at all. I don't have any propolis, so maybe someone who uses propolis for finishing, can try it & let us know how it works?

I tried beeswax & rosin softened with a bit of xylene tonight... worked not too bad.

Cheers, Mat

I have enough so that, if you really want to experiment with it, I can send you some...

In its natural state - scraped direct from the hive.

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Thanks CT... you are indeed generous, but there is a major apiary operation 10 miles from here... no sense stirring up the border security folks with trying to import agricultural product.

Cheers, Mat

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Thanks for all the responses so far.

Roop, thanks for testing beeswax, and a willingness to test propolis.

I'm guessing that almost anything not-hardening can be pressed into the wood a ways. We all know how gelled glue can go through a 1mm thick rib, with a little clamping pressure.

I have a fantasy (not that it will substitute for fantasies about women :lol: ) about a peg compound which is non-abrasive, can be easily cleaned with water, similar to some of our happier water soluble residues which can be easily cleaned from cracks.

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... a peg compound which is non-abrasive, can be easily cleaned with water, similar to some of our happier water soluble residues which can be easily cleaned from cracks.

Anybody messed around with glycerin?

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