Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Ivory inserts in bridges?


Allan Speers
 Share

Recommended Posts

Allan

I wouldn't know. My viola bridge has an ebony insert as well, on

the a-string. It isn't a student-grade bridge (or viola), however.

I never asked my viola maker why he did so, but now you aroused my

curiosity... As the ebony is inserted only at the place of the

thinnest string, I guess it prevents the string "cutting" into

the wood of the bridge, but I'm not sure about it.

Luke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on the wood in the rest of the bridge, some old bridges have excellent wood, photo?

I've seen some Aubert bridges with ivory inserts that are WAY too deep, and they are mostly a bit useless, as it makes the E sound funny, and it also looks dangerous too me, might fall out.

They might be useable bridges in any case, but nowdays other ways of reinforcing the bridge under the E string are found to be much better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a bridge from J. A. Gould & Sons, Boston, 1957, which has ivory inlays for both the A and E strings. These inlays are not visible on either the front or back surfaces of the bridge: they sit in a tiny mortise along the top edge. Each is about 5 mm. long, and slightly less than one mm. wide.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My bridge has an insert under the E that was inlaid by the maker. It's just a very small ebony chip, not one of those large factory inserts. I use the plastic protector that comes with the E just the same. Those ivory inserts may be added by the person who cut the bridge rather than being a stock factory item.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:


I have a bridge from J. A. Gould & Sons, Boston, 1957, which has ivory inlays for both the A and E strings. These inlays are not visible on either the front or back surfaces of the bridge: they sit in a tiny mortise along the top edge. Each is about 5 mm. long, and slightly less than one mm. wide.

I fist saw this method for the e string done by a prominant maker in Chicago. I liked it very much. I do that now on my own instruments. I really liked the look and the concept. I have a whole bag of old ivory piano keys that work perfectly.

I had a violin that I used ebony and gold trimmings on, so actually inlaid a piece of 14K gold under the e string.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...