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eric1514

Opinions on eBay violin, Euroviolins

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Hi all,

I've been watching offerings from Euroviolins (N&T Services)

for a while now and every once in a while, he lists a violin made

by Ivan Stankov. Here's the latest.

"http://cgi.ebay.com/Exquisite-Guarnerius-Solo-Violin-1742_W0QQitemZ180063141076QQihZ008QQcategoryZ38108QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem">

Link

I'm not knowledgeable in the finer details of violin making, so I'm

asking here about your opinions of this violin. They are always

pretty and Euroviolins does not purport them to be anything than

what they are, modern european violins and I understand that Ned (I

don't know his last name) is reputable.

Anybody ever play one? Seen one? Buy one?

Thanks for any input

Eric

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This dealer is a reasonable fellow. I've played two instruments from his collection; both were very nice. I ultimately decided on something else.

In response to 'quite a bit.....for a...Bulgarian': I'm not sure that any nationality or culture has a corner on making fine instruments. If you've found otherwise - lucky you.

MTK

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The back resembles one of my violins, which is very old. So this violin is very no doubt very appealing to me.

I think I understands geigen's point: For violins of same quality (if it can be determined objectively), most American/Italian/Western European violins seem to command higher prices. It is no secret. Because of that, I am a happy camper/buyer for higher end Chinese and Eastern European violins.

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I heard that fine quality chinese/eastern european violins are available for around $1500 - $2,000 ... thats what I heard from several people who bought such instruments (and were happy with them).

I'm not sure about the reselling value of such (fine) chinese/eastern euro violins if bought for more.

Anne :-)

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Hi Anne, thank you for your post and question as to re-sale. I

would like to ask this question, has any one on this board tried to

trade in one of these newer violins to a dealer? I know nothing

about pricing from a personnel standpoint, but have heard from

several players that they were offered less that half of what they

paid on a trade in to a higher priced old violin. The reason was

always the same in that there are so many of these

new violins around and they have a very long shelf

life for the dealer. None of the above violins were purchased

from any of the dealers, so that may be part of the low trade in,

but wondered what should one expect in a trade up of a

newer good violin made in China or elsewhere in the $1500

to$2000 range? john

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The issue is a straighforward one: why would a dealer want to "buy" a used new instrument from you for more than he could buy a new one for from the maker, directly?

This concept holds for most trade-ins, though dealers may try to mask the effect in various ways, by doing things like overpricing when they know you have a trade-in, or dealing harder on discounts. The bottom line, though, is that the dealer is in business to run a business, which means making money, not giving it away.

The one concession in this is that most dealers recognize the value of repeat customers, and also know that with a repeater they have already made a profit from the previous sale, so they can be more lenient with trade-ins of stuff they, themselves sold. Consequently, most dealers will take back what they sold in trade against higher-priced items, giving trade-in value equal to what they originally sold the item for. This is a favor for a good customer, not an obligation.

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I do know this ebay seller (Ned Nikolov). He is a Bulgarian who is now living in the States. I came to know him a few years ago on an online forum. We shared some common interests and talked about everything - politics, international affairs, history, lives in Bulgarian and in Hong Kong/China, etc. When he knew that I was looking for a better violin, he sent me a Stankov for a trial without asking for a deposit or security for payment. Holy cow! It put those more expensive Italian/French violins to shame. Although I did not (and still do not) like the antiquing, it sounded so good that I knew I should not miss it. For about $3,300 it became mine. (I understand that Stankov's violins are now selling for about $6,000). I have shown my Stankov to a few players. All of them (including a first violinist of the HK Phil who was once the Concertmaster of Juilliard Opera Orchestra) were extremely impressed.

Ned is not selling on ebay for a living. He is promoting his mother country and his fellow Bulgarian makers who do not have many opportunities to promote themselves in the outside world. You probably will not see many of these higher end Bulgarian violins around because they are low production hand-made violins.

Re-sale value? I don't really care. I am not going to sell my Stankov. By the way, if you do not like the varnish, ask Ned if he can get you one without antiquing. You may also consider commission one from Mr. Stankov with your preferred varnishing style. Hers is a photo of Mr. Stankov.

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Hi John J,

Violins are not like stocks or bonds that can be traded easily. It does not mean that they do not have values.

Better players who are always looking for better tones, pay higher prices for their instruments.

There are so many examples, I know. They are not crazy people.

Lower priced violins have their reasons. In short, they are not in demand.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
warren
I do know this ebay

seller (Ned Nikolov). He is a Bulgarian who is now living in the

States. I came to know him a few years ago on an online forum. We

shared some common interests and talked about everything -

politics, international affairs, history, lives in Bulgarian and in

Hong Kong/China, etc. When he knew that I was looking for a better

violin, he sent me a Stankov for a trial without asking for a

deposit or security for payment. Holy cow! It put those more

expensive Italian/French violins to shame. Although I did not (and

still do not) like the antiquing, it sounded so good that I knew I

should not miss it. For about $3,300 it became mine. (I understand

that Stankov's violins are now selling for about $6,000). I have

shown my Stankov to a few players. All of them (including a first

violinist of the HK Phil who was once the Concertmaster of

Juilliard Opera Orchestra) were extremely impressed. Ned is not

selling on ebay for a living. He is promoting his mother country

and his fellow Bulgarian makers who do not have many opportunities

to promote themselves in the outside world. You probably will not

see many of these higher end Bulgarian violins around because they

are low production hand-made violins. Re-sale value? I don't really

care. I am not going to sell my Stankov. By the way, if you do not

like the varnish, ask Ned if he can get you one without antiquing.

You may also consider commission one from Mr. Stankov with your

preferred varnishing style. Hers is a photo of Mr. Stankov.

Thanks for the input. I'm not in a position to buy right now, but I

love looking and was hoping I wasn't looking at a $50 violin,

gussied up all pretty like. I have to sell my present violin to

afford another. I'm bored with it.

Thanks,

Eric

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There are some Stankov violins and violas in US shops. Maureen Menzel has one in her shop in Livingston NJ. The price is $5700, which also seeemed high to me since I have a Bulgarian violin that I bought in Bulgaria for a whole lot less than that. When I was in Bulgaria, $2000 was about the upper end for a master-made violin. The internet price should be lower than from a good shop since the service should be better at the shop, particularly one in a high rent district like Menzel's.

The Stankov in Maureen's shop would hold its own tonally with the $15,000 Italian violas in her shop and would blow away any of the Chinese or German violas. Admittedly, she did not have a great selection of either. Selections of violas are typically more limited than for violins. I also did not care for the varnish on the top, or the back. I think it is a bit too shiny and reddish for my taste, but that is my taste, yours could differ.

I wound up buying an $1800 Chinese viola from a different shop that is tonally close to the Stankov, but not as good. Visually, I like the visuals of the Chinese viola (or my Bulgarian violin) better and admit that looks are important to me in violins or women. I just can't help myself. Besides, the viola goes to high school on the bus and at that point I didn't want to spend a pile of money for something that is going to lead a hard life. It also was my stepson's first foray into viola territory. Now that he has been playing viola for 9 months and is committed to it, my wife is considering $15,000 Italian violas as a step-up.

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I really like the Stankov, sounded real nice, he did not have one

when I had the cash. So I tried the two others from Pertov, nice

but not a Stankov. Ned is a great guy and a straight shooter.

Don't get him started on China violins...though. I got a couple of

China violins that were advertised as aged 10-12 years...and they

were as green as they come.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
texbambam
I really like the

Stankov, sounded real nice, he did not have one when I had the

cash. So I tried the two others from Pertov, nice but now a

Stankov. Ned is a great guy and a straight shooter. Don't get him

started on China violins...though. I got a couple of China violins

that were advertised as aged 10-12 years...and they were as green

as they come.

Say, Texbambam, how would you descibe the tone?  He's offered

to let me try one, but I'm not able to purchase at this time and

don't want to waste his time.

Thanks,

Eric

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I have been dealing with Ned for a long time. He used to be based in Tennesee. As Warren said, Ned is promoting Bulgaria. His instruments are good and affordable. He also has a source for good "white" violins and student instruments. He imports other items and also is an agent for some pretty Bulgarian models (girls not fiddles). He is actually some sort of "scientist" by trade. He is totally honest in my opinion.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
george behary

He imports other items and also is an agent for some pretty Bulgarian models (girls not fiddles).

I like a man with a broad range of interests!

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