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Is a 35mm high bridge a "no no"?


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quote:


Originally posted by:
Michael Darnton
...As for

the various ways to solve the problem. Usually one tends to look to

the least invasive method. It might be a "complete" solution to

reset a neck, but it's invasive. The other available ways all have

advantages and disadvantages, and MAY solve the problem entirely,

or not. That's part of the art of figuring out what to do.

Michael,

yes, that's what makes this all so interesting, is so many ways to

approach something, all of which affect each other, and all must be

kept in mind and balanced! the more i learn about violins, the more

amazed i am by them and the people who build them!  

cassi  

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Cassi,

it would be interesting for you to go to a shop and find a violin thats realy easy to play and compare with one thats harder to play,but with slightly lower strings(same string brand).Then you could see if the effort you're puting into playing is related to pressing the string down,or just making the violin "work".

Gabriel

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quote:


Originally posted by:
choo-choo plane

If anyone has any further ideas or comments

from the additional information I've given here, please don't

hesitate to post it! I'll wait to read your comments before taking

any action.


While 29 is an unusually high projection with a 5mm outset, might as well string it up and see what you've got before making changes. It just might work...........little risk in trying.

Also, see if the fingerboard is warped "up" by checking with a straight edge to see if the lower surface is flat. If that's the problem, it might be solved with a new fingerboard, or by removing he fingerboard and planing the bottom surface flat.

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cassi,

I think the "Filius Andreae" bit was to distinguish Joseph (son of Andrea) from Joseph (son of Joseph, aka del Gesu).

That family didn't seem to have a very lively imagination when it came to names - there were also two called Peter. One was the son of Andrea and brother of Big Joe, the other was the son of Big Joe and the brother of Little Joe. They are distiguished by the cities in which they worked: Peter of Mantua, and Peter of Venice.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
gabi
Cassi, it would be

interesting for you to go to a shop and find a violin thats realy

easy to play and compare with one thats harder to play,but with

slightly lower strings(same string brand).Then you could see if the

effort you're puting into playing is related to pressing the string

down,or just making the violin "work". Gabriel

Gabriel,

That might be an interesting experiment, except for a couple of

things: first, finding a shop to indulge me in such a thing (the

shops here all think i'm crazy enough as it is!); and second, i'm

not really too interested in pursuing this as a general principle,

i just was trying to find some explanation for why my left wrist

hurt more and my arms got more tired when playing the violin i was

trying out (which had the higher string heights)...

maybe the string height was not all the reason, but the maker

lowered the string height, i traded violins, and i have not really

had the pain and tiredness since; who knows, maybe i just got used

to the new violin, and lowering the strings didn't really make it

more playable, although my teacher felt the same way (and who

knows, maybe that was a placebo effect also, as i told the strings

were lower and it was easier to play!)

to me, the more exciting thing is that, to me, and to my teacher,

the violin is sounding sweeter and richer all the time (i won't

argue one way or the other for the 'playing in' effect, that's just

how i feel, it's very subjective!), and the more i play it, the

better i love it, which is the opposite of the violins i've had

before!

thanks for the advice!

cassi  

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Jacob
cassi, I think the

"Filius Andreae" bit was to distinguish Joseph (son of Andrea) from

Joseph (son of Joseph, aka del Gesu). That family didn't seem to

have a very lively imagination when it came to names - there were

also two called Peter. One was the son of Andrea and brother of Big

Joe, the other was the son of Big Joe and the brother of Little

Joe. They are distiguished by the cities in which they worked:

Peter of Mantua, and Peter of Venice.

Jacob,

i am a permanent resident of the state of Confusion, so i get who's

who all mixed up! thank god there was only one Stradivarius!

 

at least they weren't all named 'George'!  

cassi  

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quote:


Originally posted by:
David Burgess

quote:


Originally posted by:
Cassi
thank god there was

only one Stradivarius!

Uhm.........

i *thought* that might get some dissension!  

(i know he had two sons, but i don't think they made any

instruments on their own?...and i know some people might wish for

more makers like Antonio...)

cassi  

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Jacob

That family didn't seem to have a very lively imagination when it came to names....

The tradition was to name a son after a relative. Thus Joseph (Giuseppe) 'filius's' son (Bartolomeo Giuseppe 'Del Gesù') was named after his great grandfather Bartolomeo, Andrea's father. Joseph's other son, Pietro 'of Venice' was named after his uncle (Peter 'of Mantua').

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Torbjörn Zethelius

quote:


Originally posted by:
Jacob

That family didn't seem to have a very lively imagination when it came to names....

The tradition was to name a son after a relative. Thus Joseph (Giuseppe) 'filius's' son (Bartolomeo Giuseppe 'Del Gesù') was named after his great grandfather Bartolomeo, Andrea's father. Joseph's other son, Pietro 'of Venice' was named after his uncle (Peter 'of Mantua').

Is it any strange that in Italy people often end up calling each other "Gigi" or "Giò" or other short names? I wonder what Strads' familiy and friends called him? Antò?

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Yeah I know, the bridge was made by Beare so I guess it's gotta be

good.

I just wanted to know if anyone out there uses a standard set of

variables.

Like, the violin is very high arched, big scoops at both ends, flat

in the middle.

If I am to make an exact copy of this violin I need to know if

there are any problems

with such low bridges, since I've never cut a bridge so low.

I will measure the arching next time I see it, forgot to do so last

time.

Also, I lost all the digital photos I had of Corina and her Strad,

should have used 67 film.

On the bright side it gives me an excuse to see the instrument

again!

Cheers.

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I used to have rules, but now I use intuition more. I'd think that violin would be a bit difficult to make work, if I remember it correctly. When I saw it, it hadn't been together for decades, and had the top off.

I probably would have used both a slightly higher insert (for less pressure) and a slightly higher bridge (for more torque on the top, which looked pretty stiff)--like 26mm+, but not 27mm. Mainly, though, I try to stay away from copying things like that--Stradivari could do it, but for a modern maker it's like running with weights. :-)

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Hi everyone,

Well the problem is fixed!

After some thought I decided I shouldn't do a neck pull-up because

the belly has san old, previously-repaired crack coming down from

the top of the upper bout and I really didn't want to risk

re-opening it while opening the upper portion of the belly. (I

don't have as much experience as some of you do.)

So I decided to remove the fb and plane a tiny bit off the neck

focusing on the lower end, and then I planed a slightly greater

amount off the bottom of the fb in the 'same' region. Now all is

back together with a new nut, and the glue is drying.

I made sure to test the fingerboard projection and bridge height

while making the modifications, and am pleased to say that the

bridge height is now 33mm. I'm happy with that!

Manfio to answer your question, the original bridge is long gone.

The owner of this violin bought it as it was (no fingerboard or

bridge), and has been keeping it untouched until now.

So thank you all for your advice and interesting discussions!

You've been most helpful indeed.

André

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Michael thanks for the tips, good to know how you feel about that

arching.

I feel the same way, and I have reached a compromise whereby the

player

will be happy if I make something very much like the 1666 but with

some modern

principals. Like, an easier front arch etc. Obviously the scroll,

the f's and the outline will

be as near as I can get. It's quite a wide violin too, so I may

have to make a new form if

none of my 14 violin forms will do.

 

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quote:


Originally posted by:
matzstudio

i am still curious about the connection of vibrato and string height. in theory the effective frequency shift should be smaller with a lower string angle (if we take a "given" vibrato move) - but with increased tension as a result of greater string height maybe the vibrato move gets a "damper"? and the result is a smaller frequency shift?¿? also the absolute string lenght encreases a hair with a higher bridge. that would make the vibrato amplitude smaller. all i know is that in general vibratos with less shift sound smarter to the ear than the ones with bigger shift. oh well, what do i know.

matzsstudio,

If the string would have an equal output of all its partials,and the violin would amplify them equally,then your mechanical model could be relevant(smaller string hight=less frequency shift).But in real life each violin amplify the signal from the strings differently,and have a different spectral output.

On some notes you can use a wide vibrato and not have the desired results if half of your vibrato swing falls on to a pit in the spectrum.Is not that you're not achieving the actual shift in frequency(you might,but not necessarily,some partials get filtered completely),but due to the fact that the sound levels are so widely spaced the ear perceives the vibrato,in that case, as amplitude modulated,which in my opinion is less effective. On others a minimal motion would have the optimal result if you have a good even levels on the partials.

Gabriel

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