Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

(Anyone know Russian?)


Hilary
 Share

Recommended Posts

Above Wieniawski's name there is a header that reads "Concert Repertory of the Violinist," apparently the title of a series of publications to which this item belongs, and the line below "Scherzo-Tarantella" reads "For Violin and Pianoforte." The cover doesn't give the name of the editor; perhaps the first page of the music does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for your help! I wonder if the Soviet Union Publishing House still printing? A quick search on google yeilded no results. Hmm.... but anyhow, here's the first page:

IMG_0639.jpg

Just out of curiosity since the first page is now posted, what does the part right after the word leggiero say? I never paid much attention to it until now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The editor was Konstantin Mostras, who a student of Auer and a teacher of Galamian, and was Professor of Violin at the Moscow Conservatory--a very distinguished violin teacher. ("Mostrasa" is the genitive or possessive form; the first page of the violin part reads "Editing of the violin part of [i.e., by] K. Mostras.") The copy of the page is cut off, but I think Mr. York is right: the writing to the right of "leggiero" looks like it says "[stay] in position"--it would be fifth position. Incidentally, the publisher was the State Musical Publishing House, not the "Soviet" Publishing House.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that I can read the entire words after "leggiero," they do read "in position." There is an alternative fingering underneath the staff that brings you down into first position.

Here's some additional information about Konstantin Mostras, courtesy of Great Masters of the Violin, by Boris Schwartz (New York, 1983). His dates were 1886-1965. He taught first at the Moscow Philharmonic School and then, from 1922, at the Moscow Conservatory. He collaborated with his Moscow Conservatory colleague David Oistrakh in editing the Tschaikovsky violin concerto, eliminating alterations in the violin part made by Auer. Along with Avram Yampolski, Miron Poliakin, and of course Oistrakh, as well as others, he was one of the teachers at the Moscow Conservatory who contributed to maintaining violin playing in the Soviet Union at such a high level.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow! Thank you so much for your infromation Bill. "The Muzyka archives hold over 500,000 titles and are regarded as one of the world's most outstanding collections of sheet music." I hadn't even heard of them until now. By the way, you wouldn't know if I can buy actual copies in the States would you? The site you gave lets you print out the pages, but gah, it's been ages since my printer worked.

Also, where would I be able to find more information on Auer's students? Not the ones everyone know, ie Heifetz, Elman, Milstein.... but the lesser known ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"By the way, you wouldn't know if I can buy actual copies in the States would you?"

I suspect it would be difficult. I'm not aware of a US distributor for Muzyka. You could try calling Joseph Patelson's in New York. Here is a link to their website:

Patelson's

Here is a link to Frank Music Company, another New York sheet music seller that might be able to help you:

Frank Music Company

You also might try asking one of the many Russian musicians in this country.

Incidentally, it's interesting to note that, according to the information in the link in my previous message, the pre-revolution predecessor of Muzyka was Tschaikovsky's exclusive publisher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Also, where would I be able to find more information on Auer's students? Not the ones everyone know, ie Heifetz, Elman, Milstein.... but the lesser known ones."

There are three relatively recent books in English on eminent violinists that contain information about Auer students.

The best, in my view, is Great Masters of the Violin, by Boris Schwartz (New York, 1983), but it is the least easily obtainable. It has an entire chapter and more on Auer students in Russia and the U.S. It's out of print and second-hand copies are expensive. It has a substantial bibliography.

The Great Violinists, by Margaret Campbell (New York 1981; originally published in Britain) is in my judgment a little more superficial, but it seems to have been reissued in Britain.

Violin Virtuosos, by Henry Roth (Los Angeles 1997), is stongly opinionated, although the author's opinions carry substantial weight. (He seems intent on proving that Heifetz is God, which is true of course but personally I'm a polytheist.) I think that book has recently been reissued, too.

There is also The Amadeus Book of the Violin, by Walter Kolneder (Portland 1998), which may still be in print and deals with all aspects of the violin, including violinists throughout history (or the German version, Das Buch der Violine.

Finally, in German there is Grosse Geiger Unserer Zeit ("Great Violinists of Our Time"), by Joachim W. Hartnack, which has come out in numerous editions and is published by Artemis in Zurich.

All of these books will identify Auer pupils and provide information about them. Hope this helps.

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...