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stevenwong

New Tartini Rosin

21 posts in this topic

Hi All,

I am confused... Is Andrea rosin (developed by Maestro Andrea Bang) the new Tartini Rosin or is the rosin from Stringpath the new Tartini Rosn (developed by MinKwang Kang)?

Which is which? or Are they related?

The links for the abovementioned rosins are below:-

Andrea Rosin

Stringpath

Please enlighten me....

Steven

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I am also confused with the new names and all, but I am under an impression that:

1. Andrea Rosin: is what we called Tartini. Unfortunately, they don't seem to offer "Tartini Green" at this time. I only stocked two cakes of TG and would to hope that they will come out with Green in a couple of years the latest.

2. Stringpath: as stated on the site, their rosin receipe are completely different from "old Tartini". So that's intriguing...What does mean by "receipe" are completely different? Ingredients? Temperature? Pressure???? But they offer three kinds of rosin for violin use.

Can we have a product review on these so-called new Tartini's? Thank you.

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Tartini Green...? I thought it has been discontinued...?

Anyway, has anyone tried anything from Andrea Bang or MinKwang Kang?

Also, Stringpath has the "Old Tartnini" picture... So does that mean that they are the originator of Old Tartini? And Maestro Andrea Bang is kinda "branch out" from the Old Tartini...?

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Hi

Andrea Bang actually discovered and recreated the recipe for the

original Tartini rosin. He has relaunched it under his own

name, and now works with Cremona In Seoul who market the rosin for

him. He has changed the recipe only very slightly to improve

it .  So if you want Tartini rosin you need to go for the

Andrea. The other Tartini which is being sold as "New Tartini" is a

different recipe (as per the Stringpath website)  and does not

come from Andrea's original research and recipe. You can find more

information on the Cremona in Seoul website

 http://www.cremonainseoul.com  (sorry -

can't put the direct link in yet - just need to work out how to do

it). Andrea is not connected to Stringpath.

Hope this helps explain things!

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Andrea's grades are a bit different than Tartini. Does anyone have opinions on which Andrea rosins are equivalent to the old Tartini products? I'd especially like to know what's similar to Silkier Soloist. Thanks -Steve

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Hi Steve.

The  Andrea rosins for Violin , Viola, and Cello are produced

in two types, one for solo (Paganini, David, and Casals) and one

for symphony ( Vitali, Vienna, and Toscanini) .  The solo

rosins are the equivalent of the silkier solo. More bite and

projection. The symphony rosins give a sound that blends more with

other instruments - as the Tartini silkier symphony did.  The

Andrea Alex for bass is more similar in it's effect to

the old Tartini green for cello/bass - very grippy.  Although

the formulas have changed a wee bit, they have the same

characteristics, just better.

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Yes, thanks allyxa. Nice to know that when I use up my Tartini there's something else out there that's similar. -Steve W.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
allyxa

He has changed the recipe only very slightly to improve

it .

Hi allyxa,

Have you tried Andrea's products yourself and found the statement to be true or you just copied the sale pitch?

Thanks.

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Well, I've tried these rosins, and I could not tell them apart from other allright rosins. I still stick to Bernardel or Hill or why not Larsen. But perhaps it's just me, and I'm not a player either. Could someone please tell me what's so special about these?

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Hi

I used to use Tartini silkier solo cello rosin as I liked the sound

it gave me, and playing characteristics were very good. I now use

the cello solo Casals Andrea as it's just about the same if not a

bit better. The sound and playing characteristics are

still very good (thank heavens as I was worried when Tartini

changed). I still have various Tartini rosins here with

me so I was able to test Andrea against them. I

have played cello for 25 years odd so have tried a number of

different rosins in that time.

A friend of mine used to distribute Tartini here in the UK and when

the rosin became Andrea I tried it, and because I still liked it in

it's current incarnation, I eventually took over distribution here.

So obviously I am not impartial. However, I only sell things I have

used and like and can trust to be good. I used Tartini for a long

time before I started to sell it under the Andrea name.  I

don't play violin, viola or bass, but am lucky enough to know a

good selection of players who are called upon to act as my guinea

pigs - bless 'em for their patience! No one has disliked the

Andrea yet, and all have found it comparable to Tartini

in it's original version.

I hope this helps without coming across as commercial - I know I

sell the stuff, but it's because I like it and it works.

 Hopefully someone else will jump into this thread who has

used both and who doesn't sell it so that you can have more

opinions that are completely  impartial! 

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quote:


Originally posted by:
magnus nedregard

Well, I've tried these rosins, and I could not tell them apart from other allright rosins. I still stick to Bernardel or Hill or why not Larsen. But perhaps it's just me, and I'm not a player either. Could someone please tell me what's so special about these?

For me, Tartini is just a rosin that suits my style and equipment well; nothing magical about it. I do think it's pretty pricey and was skeptical of the story about it being reformulated from a cake dating from Tartini's time, but it works for me better than anything else I've used; I find it very smooth-playing and it lets me get a wide range of dynamics. -Steve

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I bought the Tartini Green Rosin for my daughter and it was great. However, she is now using the Andrea Bang's "Paganini" rosin for violin. The tone, to me, is so much better. Her friend bought the "Vivaldi" rosin and did not like it at all. The tone is no way as good as the "Paganini".

Cheers,

Allegro

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Before I used Tartini Green, I had Hilrosin (? English made, cannot remember the name now). The difference is very apparent even to a very beginner like me.

Paganini = old Tartini Solo

Do they have any plans to produce Tartini Green equivalent? I am not sure I want to switch to Paganini if they have T. Green equivalent.

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Hi Miles

I have asked CIS what their plans are regarding the green rosin. As

soon as I hear back with the information I will post it here to let

you know.

Hi Allegro - thanks for your experiences regarding the Paganini and

the Vivaldi - it's really helpful to have honest feedback.

 I'll also ask if CIS plan to make a mini version of the other

rosins. I know that they have plans to make a medium size cello and

bass rosin as well as the current (very) large blocks. But (in my

personal opinion) a mini of each of the other rosins (the size of

the Vivaldi) would be useful to have for testing

before deciding which of the larger sizes to buy.

allyxa

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quote:


Originally posted by:
allyxa

I have asked CIS what their plans are regarding the green rosin. As

soon as I hear back with the information I will post it here to let

you know.


Thanks a lot, allyxa.

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Hi

I have heard back from Justin at CIS. He advises that after talking

to players and analyzing data and feedback, they decided only to

produce the solo and symphony versions of the rosin, not the green.

The solo and symphony rosins were the ones preferred by most

players and they felt that the green was not tonally as good.

Sorry!

There are no plans to introduce mini versions of the main rosins at

present, so the smallest size (3cm diameter) will only be the

Vivaldi.

Thanks

allyxa

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Hi All,

Finally I had gotten my hands onto 2 cakes of Andrea Rosin - Paganini Solo for Violin and Casals Solo for Cello....

It was a minute ago that I tried the rosin for violin... (No, it does not make me play like Paganini)

I find that the bow hairs readily 'grip' the strings.... the sound is definitely silkier.... smooth... Also, I find that it has better projection... I may not have tested it in a concert hall... but it was my wife that commented that it appears to be louder... I was practising in the room... and she said violin was loud and crystal clear even when she was in the kitchen!...

I felt that the 'grip' of strings and silky smooth tone generated was even more pronounced when in higher positions...

I am very pleased with the rosin.... definitely recommended to all...

I shall update after the Casals Solo for Cello is tested....

One question:- This cake of rosin will probably last me a very long time... should the rosin be replaced before it is finished? is there a recommended time frame I should replace this cake of rosin?

steve

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Hi Steve

In answer to your questions about the life of the rosin, you should

be able to play quite happily with the rosin block you have for a

long time. There is no stated recommended time in which to

replace the rosin.

Thanks

allyxa

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