Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Poll - How many use A-string fine tuners?


henrypeacham
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have one violin that uses two fine tuners and one that uses one fine tuner. Each came that way when I bought them and didn't change the fine tuners. I bought the one with two fine tuners in Bulgaria. The one with one fine tuner was made in the USA, or at least finished by an AMerican luthier.

I think that two fine tunders is common in Eastern Europe as are steel A and E strings combined with gut or synthetic G and D strings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That set-up (using fine tuners on both the E and A strings) was very common prior to 1970 or so, especially with students. Unless you were using all-metal strings, the G and D were gut wound --and a fine tuner wasn't needed. The metal E always needed one, of course. But in the case of the A string, a few old-timers would still use plain gut, otherwise, it was either a metal A or a gut wound A. The gut wound A's typically had a short life span and required constant tuning.

As a student in the 1950's, I started with all steel strings and four tuners for the first year, and then switched to the 2 tuner set-up. It was only after I was quite advanced before using a gut wound A. I still have one instrument with this set-up, but I usually now use a Tonica A with gut wound D and G.

The sound that I want can come only from gut, in the case of the D and G strings. But for the A string, the difference seems less critical.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Henry,

This question does not say so much because it's totally dependent on what type of string you have. As Danielle said: gut strings don't need a fine tuner. What is left are steel strings: and all that have these strings use a fine tuner mostly four.

The answer on the initial question when only steel strings are taken into account must be: hundreds of thousands.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The A tuner is helpful in orchestra (and performance) situations to quickly retune slight changes that may have occurred. There are a few female viruosi who use them (Mutter and maybe Chang).

I was always a one-tuner (E) violinist, but I did switch to Bois d'Harmonie tailpieces as I approached age 70 to make small tuning changes easier when my joints hurt. I probably still do 90%+ of my (non-E) tuning with the pegs. But those other fine tuners have come in handy under tho hot stage lights.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:


Originally posted by:
Winston

That set-up (using fine tuners on both the E and A strings) was very common prior to 1970 or so, especially with students. Unless you were using all-metal strings, the G and D were gut wound --and a fine tuner wasn't needed. The metal E always needed one, of course. But in the case of the A string, a few old-timers would still use plain gut, otherwise, it was either a metal A or a gut wound A. The gut wound A's typically had a short life span and required constant tuning.

I began learning in the 1960s and used that setup for many years. It worked well but because of the steel A I never learned to tune my A string "properly" i.e., with the violin in position, manipulating the peg with the LH fingers. Still can't do it, but I use a Pusch tailpiece with 4 fine tuners with my synthetic strings so it's not typically an issue!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...