Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Here's a great auction!


PhilipG
 Share

Recommended Posts

This is actually pretty neat and I don't know if he is going to

have his reserve met.  I wish it were a whole lot less,

though!

It's item #  7422180583 in Musical Instruments > String

> Violin > Acoustic > 4/4.

For some reason I can't get my copy/paste to work.  

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBaylSAPl.dll?ViewI...MEBl%3APIC&rd=1

I actually typed in the above, so I hope it works.  Otherwise,

the item number should bring it up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The eBay mentality on these kinds of auctions is really quite interesting. If he were selling each fiddle separately he wouldn't get near what is being bid. For some reason people think they are getting a deal if they buy in quantity.

The bidders identities are hidden as well. Saves on the embarrassment when you are actually the winner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

At this point, each violin is worth (at least to the seller) $425.00. Also, there is a notice on his auction now that he lowered his reserve, more than likely to $6,000.00. I suppose it's going to be a task for anyone to make that money back, let alone make any money on the deal at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The trunk is pre-WW11 craftsmanship at its finest.

Built like a battleship and lined with padded silk, these trunks were specially commissioned in Berlin for the trans-shipment of fine Cremonas from Europe to America.

Ordinary fiddles were shipped in lesser grade cases and packed in straw.

In these trunks, only the finest materials were used and they are mounted on castors for ease of handling.

They are very rare and unlikely to be made again to these standards.

Maybe a fine Bergonzi was overlooked and still remains in the collection

Glenn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dunno, Glenn...I still think you might be trying to extract the Wee Michael. I suppose the trunk might possibly be valuable to someone who routinely ships a dozen fiddles a time intercontinentally by boat, but otherwise I'd think it'd be like one of the CDC supercomputers from the '60s: a piece of history, but not actually usable in everyday life today or attractive as a display.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're opening up a can of worms there, Bean.

Does function determine value?

No one ever found much use for the Mona Lisa. Covering a nasty blemish on the wall, maybe?

Violins are about the only works of art I can think of that actually DO something and even there, how well they perform is no criterion for the value placed on them.

I'm revelling in that fact that no-one considers violin cases collectible these days so I can snap up marvellous objects steeped in history for the proverbial song.

In a world where books are written on collectible cookie cutters and bakelite jewelry, I look forward to the day when our cases start to be appreciated (but not until I've laid in a good stock of them )

Glenn

Case connoisseur and eccentric collector.Text

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Glenn - I'm totally in agreement with you on this. You have stumbled on a collecting field which has not been exploited and where there are beautiful and interesting historical items readily available. Even my old Lifton gives me a charge when I examine the quality and detail of it's construction. And let's not get started on Hill cases, the holy grail as far as I'm concerned.

The only slight error you made was putting this up on the net. Let's hope nobody is paying attention!

All Best, Larry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll step away from the discussion, then, since I evidently don't understand the collector's point of view. To me, the Mona Lisa would be something to enjoy and study every day. And I've seen some Hill cases that qualify as true examples of artistic craft (i.e., works of art that have a practical use, per the definition pioneered by W.R.Lethaby at the Central School of Arts and Crafts). But this one doesn't seem to fit that definition, so I can only suppose its value comes more from the same place as the value of Victorian/Edwardian tinplate toys: few still exist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hold the phones, did the seller remove the reserve? When I checked just now I didn't see any "reserve not met" on the listing.

I've read through the descriptions, and looked at the photos. There are a couple passable Mirecourt fiddles in the bunch, and an all right Juzek or so not nearly $6K worth. Then I saw this:

"Bed 4 Pietro Messori, Italian 1912, labeled, a beautiful instrument by a highly desired early 20th century Italian maker. Double purfled, nice flamed one piece back, very well done scroll work...High dollar maker at all Auction Houses that sale instruments."

And I looked the photo of the only double purfled fiddle in the bunch, which appears to me to be a strangely varnished German factory Maggini copy.

Do you think one of the bidders actually thinks this is the real deal? I've been buying on Ebay for awhile now and I'd like to say I can't believe that, but...stranger things have happened!

Course that case is pretty sweet I must say.... I know a luthier who would LOVE to have that to use for storage and just as an awesome piece of "furniture" in his shop!

I hope it's mostly for the case

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bean - Don't step away from the discussion. I enjoy a good debate.

You and I might not appreciate tinplate toys but some people do and they have value.

I even know a few people who don't appreciate violins (yes, it's true!) but it takes all sorts..........

Reepicheep's luthier apparently would appreciate it so now we know there are two people and it only takes two enthusiasts to drive up an auction price.

BTW Reep, eBay changed the rules recently and no longer displays the 'Reserved Met' phrase after the reserve is met.

So, the mystery remains. If it's not the violins causing the interest, what is it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No Bean. One is enough!

outsidemn1vl.jpg

Mine is a little earlier, Third Reich period. Note the brass locks; and I really don't need another 12 violins.

Sharper eyes than mine might have spotted a gem of a fiddle and I hate to think what the shipping costs will be. These cases can hardly be lifted even when empty.

I think the price paid was slightly on the high side but not by much.

Glenn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the violins sold in that auction was purchased by the seller from me a while back.

I don't think his photos were very helpful (not detailed enough). But the seller's description of at least that one violin was completely accurate. It was very old, with an authentic label, and was worth at least $1,000 by itself wholesale (and very enjoyable to play).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:


The only slight error you made was putting this up on the net. Let's hope nobody is paying attention!

Believe it or not, I collect the old black GSB or handmade coffin or other style wood cases. I never bid more than fifteen bucks, and if the shipping is too much I pass, but I like them. I dare not tinker with anything of great value. I stick to things I think no- one will EVER want, and that way I GET TO HAVE SOMETHING. Let the real experts (you guys & gals) do the real owning, buying, selling, collecting, profiting and so on. I'll take the easy wood project just for its relaxation/ hobby value.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...