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Tarisio Auction

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quote:


Originally posted by:
bean_fidhleir

How about 374? Would anyone care to opine as to what's "interesting" about it, apart from the rather unique figure on the back?

(sorry, I meant 374, not 376)


I found the outline quite interesting on 374.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
zinomaniac

jason vs slicer

now 72,000!


So, considering that's about 80K after the premium, what does that tell you? (I don't believe the buyer thought it was a Storioni)

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quote:


Originally posted by:
zinomaniac

Perhaps the buyer is a good salesman!


It tells me that more than one person felt they could identify the instrument correctly. At least that they were confident enough in their skills to put some real money on the line.

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Was surprised I missed the mark on lot 466 by so much but my guess

was based on the idea that this did not look like any Storioni that

I have ever seen or played, totally agree with Jeff, and had

no clue who the real maker might be. All in all, Tarisio had great

success in this auction just from the numbers of violins offered

and sold. I still don't know how they manage to do it, but if I did

I would not be writing my 2 cents worth.

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I liked lot 374 too, it had lots of character, the varnish seemed atractive, a very personal work but some frowners would say the workmanship is a bit crude.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
MANFIO

I liked lot 374 too, it had lots of character, the varnish seemed atractive, a very personal work but some frowners would say the workmanship is a bit crude.


Yup. I liked the character too, but someone else liked it more than I did (or at least, they were willing to pay more for it than I was).

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Jeffrey Holmes

quote:


Originally posted by:
bean_fidhleir

How about 374? Would anyone care to opine as to what's "interesting" about it, apart from the rather unique figure on the back?

(sorry, I meant 374, not 376)

I found the outline quite interesting on 374.

Now that it's off the table, could you explain what it was about the outline that you found interesting, Jeffrey? Like Manfio's frowners, I looked and could only see what looked like a rather broad-beamed fiddle with rough-looking workmanship and a very unusual figure on the back.

I really wish Tarisio would leave the photos up for awhile after the auction.

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Good musicians love soloists that are "risk takers". We, makers, love makers that are risk takers too, those that have their own and unique discourse.

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"I really wish Tarisio would leave the photos up for awhile after the auction."

Amen to that. Also, I wish they would install a feature (like ebay) that would allow you to earmark specific lots and make them easier to follow.

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I guess the theory at Tarisio is to have you join up and have access to the photo archive. I guess I'd do it, if I had a bigger stake in following auction results. As it is, I archive photos of items I'm interested in, for purely personal non-profit use. I do often wonder, though, how often auction photos end up being used for deceptive purposes on eBay.

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Hi Bean;

I found the outline to be a bit rustic and bold... Liked the wide pattern. Liked the wood (even though that kind of grain is not the most stable stuff). Liked the varnish color. The instrument (pattern, high set ffs, round lower eyes, etc.) reminded me of some of the earlier 20th century instruments I see from Pieve di Cento (or other smallish centers of making). I honestly don't know who the maker is, or was I sure where it was made, so my bidding enthusiasm was limited... I was hoping, if I obtained it, that I might have some time to figure it out. I might have come up with a name or school I was sure of... or might not have.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
MANFIO

Hi Jeffrey! Had you any enthusiasm towards the "Storioni"?


I had no commercial interest in it (I didn't bid for it), but I found it interesting... I think (as obviously the purchasers did) that it's an old Italian fiddle. I did have a guess as to the maker which one of my trusted colleagues thought might be possible, and another disagrees. It'll be interesting to find out what comes of it (if it's offered on the retail market) later on.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
cellochef

Does anyone have an opinion of the celli that were there? I personally liked the Garimberti


I thought the Garimberti was OK... wasn't crazy about the varnish color. Thought the Blanchi was pretty and he Platner was very nice.

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I loved the Blanchi. If I ever were to win the lottery.... I heard both the Platner and the Blanchi being played; such nice overtones. The Platner had quite a booming lower register.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Jeffrey Holmes

Hi Bean;

I found the outline to be a bit rustic and bold... Liked the wide pattern. Liked the wood (even though that kind of grain is not the most stable stuff). Liked the varnish color. The instrument (pattern, high set ffs, round lower eyes, etc.) reminded me of some of the earlier 20th century instruments I see from Pieve di Cento (or other smallish centers of making). I honestly don't know who the maker is, or was I sure where it was made, so my bidding enthusiasm was limited... I was hoping, if I obtained it, that I might have some time to figure it out. I might have come up with a name or school I was sure of... or might not have.

Thanks for the explanation, Jeffrey! It's interesting to know that an expert isn't necessarily put off by 'non-standard' qualities even in unidentified work.

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