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lupe0824
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Are the ones you mentioned mechanical or electronical?

Long time ago I bought my mechanical one (Taktell) in a plastic housing. I know that the piramidal mechanical ones with a wooden housing are still available. They gave a very loud tick because the housing is functioning as a resonating body. The advantage of a mechanical over an electronic one is the visual movement of the pointer. So in this case there are two indicators: one from hearring and the other is visual.

The wooden mechanical one is the most expensive.

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I prefer the electronic metronomes for steadiness of the beat and the added feature of tuning tones.

My preference is the MATRIX-MR 600 for it's loud "tick" sound. Also it has the best overtones for tuning tones, that I have heard. It may not have the widest tuning range (I believe A 440 - 445), but it can also be used to tune any note over a multi-octave range.

I believe Wittner has a similar metronome-tuner. Sorinuri also has intersting metronome tuners, but the tuning tones are not as good as my MATRIX.

I think Seth Thomas only has the older mechanical-style metronomes (am I right?).

Andy

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Both of these are mechanical - wind it up and watch the pendulum swing back and forth.

Being rhytmically challenged I have a variety of metronomes both mechanical and electrical.

I prefer the ones that can set the "one" differently so that you get pop, click, click, click, pop, click, click, click, and I can keep track of measures. I might be more rhythmically challenged than you and you might not need this feature.

For the mechnical ones, louder is better.

For the electronic ones I feed the headphone output into a guitar amp and can make it really annoying to others in the house- or the neighborhood.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
yuen

One important thing to remember, old fashion metronome does not use battery. It saves money

in the long run.

What good would that do, if it is not as accurate as the electric counterparts? Your PLAYING will be affected permanently. I strongly believe that one should NEVER be cheap as long as they can afford the best available within the budget. Get the Dr. Beat series (not the DB 30, though. The sound is too soft). I have the DB 66 (the older version) that I have been using for past 17 years or so, and am most happy with it. It can subdivide a beat into 8th, 16th and triplet. Current new model has a few extra features compared to mine. I make my students get either this or electric metronomes that has subdivisions and bpm (beat per minute) that increases by one (rather than skipping a few numbers like the old-style metronomes). It makes some serious difference in the long run. So, DON"T BE CHEAP in the wrong places!! Get a GOOD metronome. You will be grateful later on.

T.

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There are countless metronomes available. I like the Boss Dr. Beat 90 which counts out with a human voice the beat you have selected. I like that because it helps keep your place in each measure better than a simple ticking sound. Also unlike the many 'nasty' metronomes that 'forget' your settings when you turn it off, this metronome has memory settings for up to 50 patterns you want to keep and go back to readily the next time you practice.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product?sku=213017

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Toscha

What good would that do, if it is not as accurate as the electric counterparts? Your PLAYING will be affected permanently.

While price is not a good reason to buy a mechanical metronome, I don't agree with the notion that her playing will be negatively affected. What's this obsession with keeping perfect time? Surely the lack of electronic metronomes didn't ruin Kreisler's playing, and I doubt it would ruin anybody else's.

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Hi Toscha,

I have a Wittner wood mechanical metronome for 35 years it runs strong like new. It is the most

expensive nowaday.

Tick, tak,Tick tak,Tick,Tak......drive you crazy. (it never stop once it starts).

Even I finished playing, it was still running.

Sorry I seldom use it now. I try to use my foot, (it stop when I feel tired). Tak,Tak ,

Tak,..until my neighbor complaint. ....

To tell you the truth, there is not easy solution. My philosophy is that the simpler the better.

Use body movement if no body watching ?

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One thing to consider is the sound that a metronome makes. Some metronomes make a beeping sound that tends to get lost in the background when playing violin. Personally I prefer metronomes with a percussive, clicking sound than those with a high-pitched beep.

Check out this site for an idea of what different metronomes sound like.

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What you hear and what you see both counts. Things that beep have pitch; imagine a steady bflat beep as you're playing in, oh, E major. Get something that clicks. I've got the kind with a back-and-forth arc of red LED lights that give the impression of a pendulum; the down beat lights up green if I want it to. The real answer? get the kind that drives you least crazy.

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I seriously doubt a mechanical metronome will ruin a player's sense of rhythm. Certainly Kreisler was special, but there were many other players who relied on mechanical metronomes without sounding like a sputtering engine. The presence of rubato in old recordings is a stylistic choice corresponding to that particular period and not the product of inaccurate timekeeping.

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Toscha, there are about a zillion traditional fiddlers out there that can keep a rock solid beat going forEVER: count off four, start your metronome, now go take a walk around the block and when you come back they will still be dead on; but they've never used a metronome. Ever. In that world, you develop a time sense from the inside out, and through movement. My own teacher never used subdived tones; that was MY job. There's lots of different ways to arrive at the same place.

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Hi Lupe0824,

I used to have both Seth Thomas, and Winner, wood house metronomes. They are pretty much

the same. I kept the Wittner for the reason its color watchs my old piano. Later, I could not

keep the piano, only the metroonome remains in my posession. Sometime I use it, sometime

I find it annoying. We all have an internal metronome.(the best). You know what I mean?

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I'm with Toscha on this. Get a metronome that can subdivide.

A set of strings would cover the difference in price. There is no excuse not to.

A percussionist friend of mine has the best rhythm of any person I've worked with (others are perhaps his equal, but I don't know of anyone better...) I always test him...he'll start tapping 2 in one hand and 3 in the other...then he'll go on...3 against 4, 4 against 5, 5 against 6, 6 against 7, 7 against 8, 8 against 9...9 against 10!?!?!?

Yeah i can do the lower numbers too but the higher ones become simply craaaazy.

I remember a VERY picky session conductor arrived to a gig, looked up, saw my friend behind the tympani...and say out loud..."I can relax now, the rhythm machine is here..."

So then, what was my friend's advice to any person who would listen?

Get a metronome that subdivides and use it all the time in your practice.

If you won't take the advice of some violinists, take the advice of a top-shelf classical percussionist.

edit: and yes, i know there are ethnomusic cultures that have superb rhythm as well...simply due to their culture and upbringing. but how much pride does someone have to actually say... "i won't buy/use a subdividing metronome because others ended up fine without one..." ???

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quote:


Originally posted by:
chronos

The presence of rubato in old recordings is a stylistic choice corresponding to that particular period and not the product of inaccurate timekeeping.

You don't think I am NOT aware of this? I am familiar with most of the important historical violin recordings (or for the matter of fact, cellists, pianists and conductors as well) in case you have not read any of my previous posts on violinists. I am absolutely aware of how people played in old recordings.

Well, I did state my opinion about my choice of metronome based on my professional experience. Whether to listen to my opinion or not is one's choice. Bye.

T.

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Well, Toscha, prior to removing your post you spoke about subdividing beats and about how a modern orchestra director wouldn't allow the degree of rubato that was used in the time of Kreisler. Considering your earlier post about the inaccuracy of mechanical metronomes I hope you can understand how that might lead somebody to misinterpret your words. In fact, I think you know that to be the case considering you removed the post in question once you read my reply.

If you want a metronome that subdivides beats then go ahead and buy one. I only object to the idea that one's "PLAYING will be affected permanently". As far as I'm concerned, it's a totally unfounded statement. Let's not turn this into a religious debate.

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Con Ritmo: it's not, actually, "how much pride does someone have to actually say... "i won't buy/use a subdividing metronome because others ended up fine without one..." ??? ; it's more like: "metronomes make me crazy, I hate them, and I'm willing to work my butt off in other ways to develop solid rhythmic sense without that infernal ticking."

Some students love'em, some hate'em, and it's one battle I don't fight.

Actually, the metronome doesn't tell you what a good beat is, it tells you when you're deliberately but unconsciously ignoring your rhythm because your fingers can't quite cope with a certain task...not exactly the same thing.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
con_ritmo

I'm with Toscha on this. Get a metronome that can subdivide.

A set of strings would cover the difference in price. There is no excuse not to.

edit: and yes, i know there are ethnomusic cultures that have superb rhythm as well...simply due to their culture and upbringing. but how much pride does someone have to actually say... "i won't buy/use a subdividing metronome because others ended up fine without one..." ???

Great post! I totally agree with you, con_ritmo. I just cannot stand people who thinks they can be just fine without a subdividing metronome because others ended up fine without one. If one has rhythmical/technical problems, he/she needs to practice with metronome. Whether one ultimately has to play with absolute evenness is totally depending on context. From my teaching experiences, I find that people who practice regularly with a subdividing metronome has better sense of rhythm, even when they use rubato because I suspect that they know where they are departing from, rhythmically.

T.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
pandora

Con Ritmo: it's not, actually, "how much pride does someone have to actually say... "i won't buy/use a subdividing metronome because others ended up fine without one..." ??? ; it's more like: "metronomes make me crazy, I hate them, and I'm willing to work my butt off in other ways to develop solid rhythmic sense without that infernal ticking."

Some students love'em, some hate'em, and it's one battle I don't fight.

Actually, the metronome doesn't tell you what a good beat is, it tells you when you're deliberately but unconsciously ignoring your rhythm because your fingers can't quite cope with a certain task...not exactly the same thing.

I believe this speaks for itself.

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Yup. And there's other ways to get conscious without a ticker -- like having a ruthless teacher that plays a nice, steady piano accompaniment, and sends you home to "Try and hear me in your head as you're practicing, and make sure we stay together." Doesn't work with everybody, but it does work with some.

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Hi all,

My main objection is that sooner or later one has to outgrow of the dependence of the metronome.

I like to use metronome for practice only on a new piece and only for a short time. Simple

pieces I never use metronome at all. It is "too mechanical" ( one should be free to express

oneself in music "within beats") I did not mean " 1/2 + 1/2 = 1/4 + 3/4 "

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Sabine Metrotune MT9000 seems built to withstand that great force of nature..... gravity and continue functioning as necessary. It subdivides it is small in size but loud enough to hear. Has the hollow sounding tock of wood not an annoyuing electronic beep that one might expect from a similar looking product.

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