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Omobono

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Long drawn out quizes can become boring

so perhaps it's time to draw this one to a close

since the answers are more or less in place.

Maurizio and Manfio...... well sniffed out!

The answer is a teacher - pupil relationship

bridging the mid-19th to early 20th cent. from Cremona to Milan.

Would you like three scrolls before the final details of the makers?

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Zinomaniac,

Those black dots are the wooden pins that makers use during construction to ensure correct alignment of the top and back plates. Maybe some makers just added them for appearance (?).

For anyone, did Bisiach somehow treat the wood to bring out the flame of the maple and, if so, is that one of his characteristics?

Omobono,

Thanks for putting up the quiz.

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I'm going to put in $.02 on behalf of all of us pig-ignorant semi-silent lurkers: if you big guys are gonna play the "guess who" game a lot in the next few months (and it's a good one for us northern folks, brings a little liveliness to a dark cold time of year), then these trios are most welcome - we hope y'all keep 'em coming. The conversations about single instruments/attributes are educational and fascinating, but it's the chance to make COMPARISONS that really helps the ol' light bulbs go on. And now back to our sponsor.

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Time to round of this thread, I feel, before it outlives it's usefulness.

Enrico Ceruti, teacher of Riccardo Antoniazzi, teacher of Leandro Bisiach.

I put it up as an excuse really to admire the first violin of the first set.

Enrico Ceruti (1856) which to me look strikingly fresh in concept full of character. Then as a way of relating it to another instrument or two I came across a reference in an article here in the Maestronet library -

http://www.maestronet.com/m%5F...ld_strings/fall83.pdf

linking Ceruti to Riccardo Antoniazzi and then Leandro Bisiach. There was my quiz!

Elsewhere I saw the same maker, Enrico Ceruti, mentioned as the last in a line traceable back to the golden period of Cremona.

http://www.dmitrygindin.com/la...makers/e_ceruti.shtml

("Not only was Enrico Ceruti the last maker of the Ceruti Clan, but he has also been considered for some time by connoisseurs to be the last representative of traditional Cremonese violin making... " )

So I thought it significant enough to draw a line through the three makers as a bridge, if you will, to times closer to our own, knowing that the work of the Bisiachs and Leandro, in particular has wide recongition as a craftsman - he was also an able performer, it seems.

Hope it was enjoyable. Thanks to all who participated, and congratulations to those who showed their prowess and nominating the makers, and connection.

Omo.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Omobono
Enrico Ceruti (1856) which to me look strikingly fresh in concept full of character.

Could you possibly identify the details that motivate your 'strikingly fresh' and 'full of character' assessment, Omo, and say what it is about them that creates that impression for you?

To illustrate the level of detail I have in mind, my untutored (in violins, but experienced as a professional artist) reaction to those heads is that the first one has a very graceful line, much more so than the other two which are almost discontinuous. Despite that overall gracefulness I find the A peg in the first one jarring in its off-centerline placement and the carving of the scroll too shallow to appeal. That scroll is like an Art Deco ornament--quite mechanical looking when compared to the more humanistic middle one (I'm ignoring the outer line). The head on the right side looks older, heavier, and more primitive altogether (is it older?), with the scroll looking poorly proportioned and overworked (shallow, the inner turns oversized).

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omo, very informative and thoughtful as usual.

On the dimitry link you have provided there are 6 shots of I assume

cerutis from different periods.  i wonder if you can comment

on the shape of the F hole on 3 violins, namely, 1840, 1868, and

1872  (top left and the 2 bottom ones) in terms of form.

thanks and keep up the good work.

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quote:


Could you possibly identify the details that motivate your 'strikingly fresh' and 'full of character' assessment, Omo, and say what it is about them that creates that impression for you?

q]

Well, at the risk of getting in over my head here, without being comprehensive,

I think the photo below shows the inspiration for the Ceruti, but it's not slavish, is it?

There's a roundness or softness and fullness to the form that does not scream out at you the way some del Gesu's do - magnificient as they are.

How's that for starters?

(Had trouble putting these photos up this time, hope they are here now)

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Enrico Ceruti (whose real name was Riccardo Fabio, but his nickname was Enrico) had strongly individual style. His Grandfather, Giovanni Battista, was pupil of Lorezo Storione, hence the link with the Cremonese school, to wich Omobono pointed out. Enrico Ceruti was a bass player.

Not all his scrolls have this elongated style (in the pegbox), for instance, the scroll of the violin in David Rattray's Masterpieces of Italian Violin Making, but this elongated pegbox can be seen in other instruments by him and by Giuseppe Ceruti as well.

The C bouts of the violin in this quiz is very caracteristic of Ceruti's work. Thank you for that Omobono!

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I have put up the photos that were missing earlier in the post above and will try to get them in a group for easier comaprison later. How do they compare do you think? Ceruti seems to have "tamed" the del Gesu ecentricity somewhat?

Here's what some contemporaries have done with the same inspiration. (Erdesz and Peresson either side of an original)

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Omobono

I think the photo below shows the inspiration for the Ceruti, but it's not slavish, is it?

There's a roundness or softness and fullness to the form that does not scream out at you the way some del Gesu's do - magnificient as they are.

How's that for starters?


*sigh* Thanks, Omo, but I'm still not getting it. I'm just not picking up on whatever it is you're seeing.

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