Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

$45 to reglue cello seam-is it reasonable?


Elisabeth

Recommended Posts

Depends on how you look at it. How much would you have paid to locate and eliminate the buzz? Or how much would you pay for someone to reglue a seam and avoid wrecking the finish and leaving clamp marks in the wood? $45 seems might like a reasonable charge. Of course, if you had a long time relationship with the shop, and you told them just what the problem was, they could have cut you some slack. (I once took a violin w/ a small wing crack into a reputable shop and was very pleased when they said they would charge only $12 to glue it. But when I picked it up, they had just pushed in the glue without clamping it, in effect making the crack a permanent feature. Even a simple job can be messed up.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is a good point: how much would I be WILLING to pay for a solution. I had a gut feeling that he was being reasonable, considering that I do not live in a large city, and he does not have very much competition in this part of Pennsylvania. (There is only one other genuinely first rate repairman in this area.) I wonder if that rate would come down if there were several seams to glue. I am sure that he used clamps. He has a shop that is loaded with tool and devices and he knows how to use all of them. Maybe I am just very lucky.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With a job like that, I myself would check first that the open seam is clean before I glue it (if it's been open for a while, dust etc. can get in). When the open seam is clean, it is glued and clamped. In order to do this without leaving messy traces of ones work could easily add up to an hour's work. What is a reasonable hourly rate for a competent luthier in the States?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

Yes, it is a fair price in my opinion. Bottom line, he did a good job.

Here is my defintion of a good job (I am a consumer). Use not too much glue, not too little

glue, get as much as old crack glue out, use suringe (sp ?) to put hot hide-glue in ,clamped it until it dries.

Too little glue, the seam may re-open next day. Too much glue, it may result a crack

down the road when if too much stress of the cello has no place to go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:


Originally posted by:
bean_fidhleir

I would feel fine paying $45 for a well-done closure of an open back seam. I probably wouldn't feel as good about paying that much for closing a small open edge seam (e.g., between the table and the ribs), but that's a simpler repair than rejoining a back seam or invisibly repairing a crack.


While we don't know what "caliber" instrument is being worked on, I would think $45 is fine.

Bean, if you're paying $45 for a back joint repair, I would wonder if it was being done properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you use convenient number like $60/hr -- not an unreasonable figure -- that is saying it was 45 minutes work. Presumably part of the task was to hunt down and eliminate the buzz. The troubleshooting process which resulted in discovering the seam could easily take 45 minutes, even without the gluing itself. So even if you think $45 is a bit much for only two inches of seam, that may just be the final fix at the end of a painstaking process.

Or -- as has been mentioned -- on some instruments, cleaning out the old glue (especially if some previous 'fixer' used white glue) could take up that sort of time. Or if the seam also included a warped ribcage that needed careful coaxing into place. If so, the instrument may have needed to be 'stripped down'. Etcetera etcetera.

You could also just ask your luthier for further details on his/her pricing policies.

--Claire

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also take into account customer interaction. Probably, you called first, then dropped off the instrument, then picked it up, each time interrupting the work day. From the luthier's perspective, the littlest jobs can be "expensive" because there is always time spent with the customer at either end of the job. You are lucky to have a luthier you can deal with directly, rather than leaving your instrument at the front desk, for who knows to work on. Hopefully s/he's not just gluing a seam but also watching out for the overall health of your instrument. Seems like a reasonable price for someone's time and expertise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

quote:


Originally posted by:
Jeffrey Holmes

quote:


Originally posted by:
bean_fidhleir

I would feel fine paying $45 for a well-done closure of an open back seam.

While we don't know what "caliber" instrument is being worked on, I would think $45 is fine.

Bean, if you're paying $45 for a back joint repair, I would wonder if it was being done properly.

I agree, Jeffrey. When I replied I said I'd feel 'fine' but I probably should have said 'lucky' or even 'overjoyed' for a good job on a back seam at that price. $45 isn't much money even if the luthier has done so many that s/he isn't slowed down by having the cat help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...