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Can you Identify This Scribble?


Lundberg

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Ron1

Looks like it was written through the f-hole. I would think someone of Stainer's caliber; a perfectionist/artist, would be more exacting too, in labeling their instruments.

Maybe it was intended to make believe it was indeed authentic? I would imagine that whoever that person is should be able to open the top and inscribed insteading writing through the f-hole.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Ron1

Looks like it was written through the f-hole. I would think someone of Stainer's caliber; a perfectionist/artist, would be more exacting too, in labeling their instruments.

Well, if the viola da gamba label in singingmaple's post is real, then Stainer had got classical penmanship training somewhere. And anybody who'd spend that much time practicing would have taken the top back off rather than do something so sloppy as that scribble in Lundberg's post.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Singingmaple

The label in the picture I showed is said to be authentic and the Instrument has been age dated to be accurate. I can't say it was written by Stainer as I wasn't there when it was written.

The one pictured on ebay looks to be a copy, as does the violin.

The only reason I say "if" is that the hand shown wasn't the norm in German-speaking areas. That's a classical-Italian hand. It found a home in England ( ), but in German-speaking countries they used very different letterforms ( http://www.genealogia.fi/faq/tyyli7.gif ). Note that the German letterforms remained basically unchanged across Stainer's whole life and beyond, and that even the careful English writing has many "funny-looking" non-classical forms where the writer slipped and used the more common letterforms of the time.

I find it fascinating. If that label was really written by Stainer, it suggests that he did indeed learn his craft in Italy, and learned the classical handwriting at the same time, whether because that's where he learned to read and write in the first place, or because he needed a legible hand for business.

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