Sign in to follow this  
AJ

Average price if violin for pro-orchestra players

Recommended Posts

AJ   

What is considered the average price of a violin for a

professional violinist? I mean ont that plays in a profes-

sional orchestra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can see a good price range listing in the message below, by mike. A good general rule is $3,000+, with exceptions, of course.

Daniel

: What is considered the average price of a violin for a

: professional violinist? I mean ont that plays in a profes-

: sional orchestra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been my experience that serious performance students will usually have about a $15,000 violin, but sometimes if they're thinking of the future may spend $60,000-100,000. After they get a job, if it's a major orchestra, they'll usually be looking at $30,000 minimum to about $100,000 or twice that, if they can afford it. More than that is uncommon but not impossible.

: What is considered the average price of a violin for a

: professional violinist? I mean ont that plays in a profes-

: sional orchestra.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A. Brown   

: It's been my experience that serious performance students will usually have about a $15,000 violin, but sometimes if they're thinking of the future may spend $60,000-100,000. After they get a job, if it's a major orchestra, they'll usually be looking at $30,000 minimum to about $100,000 or twice that, if they can afford it. More than that is uncommon but not impossible.

Hello Michael,

Thanks for this information. My daughter is a freshman this year locally, preparing for east coast auditions next January, and I wondered about the range of instruments that other students were equipped with. What about viola prices? Thanks.

Ann Brown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Violas are a bit of a problem--they track violin prices pretty closely, except that about the most you can easily spend on a viola is somewhere around $50,000. I get a lot of calls for "a $100,000, 16+", old Italian viola" and that object doesn't exist in any quantity in proportion to the demand. The guys you'd expect to have made such a thing--between say 1760 and 1850 or so were making a lot of under 16" instruments--even 15-1/4"--which really don't meet modern needs. Then there's a huge price jump to fabulously expensive ancient Cremonese or Brescian instruments. As you might expect, when a functional instrument of the right size, of any great age, at a reasonable price, comes up I could just about sell it on the phone in 5 minutes.

I think, however, that there are a lot of great recent and new violas. Many players are forced to look at these, and find that they do the job just fine.

:

: Hello Michael,

: Thanks for this information. My daughter is a freshman this year locally, preparing for east coast auditions next January, and I wondered about the range of instruments that other students were equipped with. What about viola prices? Thanks.

: Ann Brown

: It's been my experience that serious performance students will usually have about a $15,000 violin, but sometimes if they're thinking of the future may spend $60,000-100,000. After they get a job, if it's a major orchestra, they'll usually be looking at $30,000 minimum to about $100,000 or twice that, if they can afford it. More than that is uncommon but not impossible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
S. Hersh   

To second what Michael says I would say that there is some wisdom in buying a modern viola. Since size requirements vary with players and ever changing trends, a modern viola represents an affordable way to for a player to get just the size they want and avoid some of the premium prices associated with old violas of the most desireable size. This also side steps some other potential problems with string instruments such as conditional flaws and authenticity questions. There are a number of really fine contemporary makers building truly professional quality instruments.

S. Hersh

: Violas are a bit of a problem--they track violin prices pretty closely, except that about the most you can easily spend on a viola is somewhere around $50,000. I get a lot of calls for "a $100,000, 16+", old Italian viola" and that object doesn't exist in any quantity in proportion to the demand. The guys you'd expect to have made such a thing--between say 1760 and 1850 or so were making a lot of under 16" instruments--even 15-1/4"--which really don't meet modern needs. Then there's a huge price jump to fabulously expensive ancient Cremonese or Brescian instruments. As you might expect, when a functional instrument of the right size, of any great age, at a reasonable price, comes up I could just about sell it on the phone in 5 minutes.

: I think, however, that there are a lot of great recent and new violas. Many players are forced to look at these, and find that they do the job just fine.

:

: :

: : Hello Michael,

: : Thanks for this information. My daughter is a freshman this year locally, preparing for east coast auditions next January, and I wondered about the range of instruments that other students were equipped with. What about viola prices? Thanks.

: : Ann Brown

: : It's been my experience that serious performance students will usually have about a $15,000 violin, but sometimes if they're thinking of the future may spend $60,000-100,000. After they get a job, if it's a major orchestra, they'll usually be looking at $30,000 minimum to about $100,000 or twice that, if they can afford it. More than that is uncommon but not impossible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A. Brown   

: To second what Michael says I would say that there is some wisdom in buying a modern viola. Since size requirements vary with players and ever changing trends, a modern viola represents an affordable way to for a player to get just the size they want and avoid some of the premium prices associated with old violas of the most desireable size. This also side steps some other potential problems with string instruments such as conditional flaws and authenticity questions. There are a number of really fine contemporary makers building truly professional quality instruments.

: S. Hersh

:

: : Violas are a bit of a problem--they track violin prices pretty closely, except that about the most you can easily spend on a viola is somewhere around $50,000. I get a lot of calls for "a $100,000, 16+", old Italian viola" and that object doesn't exist in any quantity in proportion to the demand. The guys you'd expect to have made such a thing--between say 1760 and 1850 or so were making a lot of under 16" instruments--even 15-1/4"--which really don't meet modern needs. Then there's a huge price jump to fabulously expensive ancient Cremonese or Brescian instruments. As you might expect, when a functional instrument of the right size, of any great age, at a reasonable price, comes up I could just about sell it on the phone in 5 minutes.

: : I think, however, that there are a lot of great recent and new violas. Many players are forced to look at these, and find that they do the job just fine.

*******

Thanks for the information. Actually, what you've described is what has already happened. The violin is mid-19th century English just under the low price range you've mentioned, and the viola is 16 1/4" and contemporary American, a miraculous bargain by comparison. It's coveted by a number of others. Both were bought as player's instruments. The daughter is at this point a double major but seems more invested in viola culture.

Ann Brown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

: : To second what Michael says I would say that there is some wisdom in buying a modern viola. Since size requirements vary with players and ever changing trends, a modern viola represents an affordable way to for a player to get just the size they want and avoid some of the premium prices associated with old violas of the most desireable size. This also side steps some other potential problems with string instruments such as conditional flaws and authenticity questions. There are a number of really fine contemporary makers building truly professional quality instruments.

: : S. Hersh

: :

: : : Violas are a bit of a problem--they track violin prices pretty closely, except that about the most you can easily spend on a viola is somewhere around $50,000. I get a lot of calls for "a $100,000, 16+", old Italian viola" and that object doesn't exist in any quantity in proportion to the demand. The guys you'd expect to have made such a thing--between say 1760 and 1850 or so were making a lot of under 16" instruments--even 15-1/4"--which really don't meet modern needs. Then there's a huge price jump to fabulously expensive ancient Cremonese or Brescian instruments. As you might expect, when a functional instrument of the right size, of any great age, at a reasonable price, comes up I could just about sell it on the phone in 5 minutes.

: : : I think, however, that there are a lot of great recent and new violas. Many players are forced to look at these, and find that they do the job just fine.

:

: *******

: Thanks for the information. Actually, what you've described is what has already happened. The violin is mid-19th century English just under the low price range you've mentioned, and the viola is 16 1/4" and contemporary American, a miraculous bargain by comparison. It's coveted by a number of others. Both were bought as player's instruments. The daughter is at this point a double major but seems more invested in viola culture.

: Ann Brown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JD   

I am also looking for a 16" viola and can't seem to find what my daughter is looking for. Can anyone help me with a list of some good contemporary American makers. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.