Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Repairing cracks


Claire
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have an old (100 years) Strad copy that has developed a very small but long

crack over the bassbar. I have taken it to a luthier who said the it was most definately

not worth the expense to repair it. It basically has not value, especially like it is now.

The sound deteriored noticeably when this happened.

I have another instrument, but I hate to see this violin sitting in the corner and not

being restored in some way to make it at least a backup. Is there someway or something

that I could do myself to repair it or at least make it playable again? The luthier didn't

give me a monetary figure for the repair--it was sort of like "you don't want to know

how much".

Thanks for any suggestions anyone might have.

Claire

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: I have an old (100 years) Strad copy that has developed a very small but long

: crack over the bassbar. I have taken it to a luthier who said the it was most definately

: not worth the expense to repair it. It basically has not value, especially like it is now.

: The sound deteriored noticeably when this happened.

: I have another instrument, but I hate to see this violin sitting in the corner and not

: being restored in some way to make it at least a backup. Is there someway or something

: that I could do myself to repair it or at least make it playable again? The luthier didn't

: give me a monetary figure for the repair--it was sort of like "you don't want to know

: how much".

: Thanks for any suggestions anyone might have.

: Claire

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: I have an old (100 years) Strad copy that has developed a very small but long

: crack over the bassbar. I have taken it to a luthier who said the it was most definately

: not worth the expense to repair it. It basically has not value, especially like it is now.

: The sound deteriored noticeably when this happened.

: I have another instrument, but I hate to see this violin sitting in the corner and not

: being restored in some way to make it at least a backup. Is there someway or something

: that I could do myself to repair it or at least make it playable again? The luthier didn't

: give me a monetary figure for the repair--it was sort of like "you don't want to know

: how much".

: Thanks for any suggestions anyone might have.

: Claire

hi claire,

i must preface this by saying i'm not a violin expert,i'm a guitar luthier.i understand the construction and set-up of the violin.i recently had a violin in my shop with the same problem.it had a 4-5 inch crack over the bass bar.i informed the customer that the repair far out weighed the value of the instrument.he also was unwilling to disassemble the violin.he also had a limited budget.since the customer is always right, i devised a plan with the customer.i took a glue needle with titebond glue,and filled the crack(this will take several applications)let the glue dry completely(a day or two).i then applied a little varnish and polished.the crack was bareley noticeable,and the tone improved.the customer was pleased with the results.i was suprised at how well it turned out.i make no claim that this "repair"will last or that it will even work for you.if you feel your violin is unplayable now it sounds like you have nothing to lose!good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: I have an old (100 years) Strad copy that has developed a very small but long

: crack over the bassbar. I have taken it to a luthier who said the it was most definately

: not worth the expense to repair it. It basically has not value, especially like it is now.

: The sound deteriored noticeably when this happened.

: I have another instrument, but I hate to see this violin sitting in the corner and not

: being restored in some way to make it at least a backup. Is there someway or something

: that I could do myself to repair it or at least make it playable again? The luthier didn't

: give me a monetary figure for the repair--it was sort of like "you don't want to know

: how much".

: Thanks for any suggestions anyone might have.

: Claire

I'd suggest that you keep looking for someone who will do a reasonable job for a lower price. Perhaps look for repair people who fix school-quality instruments, not those who just work for soloists and professionals.

There are some very acceptable repair people out there with good reputations who are not really in it for the money who will give you a good deal if you approach them properly.

I would think you could get a bass bar crack cleated properly and the bar replaced for about $150-200; it IS several hours of very skilled work, and should not be tried by the "uninitiated".

These days the 100-year old Strad copies are worth several hundred (to maybe over $1,000) dollars. They are not junk anymore, in my humble opinion.

Jeff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...