Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Klotz violin


Donna
 Share

Recommended Posts

Donna,

First of all: Don't believe Mr. Bartlet. He doesn't know your fiddle, and each one is different, no matter how well the labels match.

If you have an authentic Klotz, which are very rare, they can have some value. Most are copies or just labelled to get people to look at them more in order to get a higher value. If it is a German factory violin, in good condition, it could be worth anywhere between 300 to 600 dollars. If it is a handmade copy, it could be worth a little more. If it is truly authentic (chances one in about 1,000,000), it could be worth around $10,000. Before you get the highest price on your violin, you should take it to a violin shop (not a general music store) and get it appraised. If the shop that you take it to cannot help you, they should lead you to one that can.

Sincerely,

Daniel Medina

: My parents have a violin that has Joseph Klotz, Mittenwald, 1795 stamped in the interior. I found a little about the family. Can someone tell me the "ballpark" value of this violin?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just bought a violin stamped "Klotz" on back and has label inside "Josef Klotz in Mittenwalde anno 1795" It, indeed, appears to be quite old but in need of some parts, though the body is in good shape. The back appears to be made of two pieces and I am wondering if that is a good indication of a lesser quality instrument. While trying to learn something about it, I find that there are many copies, etc. and that some are almost worthless so I am wondering if it will be worth refurbishing for resale. Any comments are welcome.

Lois (Lo111)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are indeed lots of copies. Some do hold merit, though I cannot say for your instrument unless I see it. If you do plan to restore the violin, do not revarnish. Touch ups are acceptible, but the reason why it got that old is because of the instrument's varnish. The rest (new bridge, strings, etc) are okay, but not varnish. If you do, it will cut the value of the instrument by like 1/2. so it can make a worthless instrument worth even less.

Daniel Medina

: I just bought a violin stamped "Klotz" on back and has label inside "Josef Klotz in Mittenwalde anno 1795" It, indeed, appears to be quite old but in need of some parts, though the body is in good shape. The back appears to be made of two pieces and I am wondering if that is a good indication of a lesser quality instrument. While trying to learn something about it, I find that there are many copies, etc. and that some are almost worthless so I am wondering if it will be worth refurbishing for resale. Any comments are welcome.

: Lois (Lo111)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, Daniel, for your prompt reply and good information. I do not intend to refinish the wood but will have strings, etc. replaced by someone who has done work on my other instruments. I'm intrigued by vintage instruments and though I know nothing about their values, or how to determine the good from the bad, I like to buy those that I can afford when I come across them at local auctions and estate sales. I just started to browse thru the web this morning and came across this message board. I've learned so much from this website already!

Again, thanks.- Lois (Lo111@aol.com)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Dear Daniel Medina,

I have a violin With a label in it that reads (as closely as I can make out) Georges Klotz / in Mittenvvald in der lier 1735

The violin has been in my family for some time. It is a 7/8 size and has a one piece back. The sound is exceptional. It was given to me by my aunt was a music teacher and violinest

but she never had it appraised. I have taked it to a local appraiser but they said I needed someone with more expertise in old violins

Can you help me?

Brian Luby

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...