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DigiMark

Hardest of the Concertos

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This is solely a curiosity thread.

I've heard different opinions as to which of the major concertos is the hardest. Which do you guys think. Hardest musically? Technically?? Personally, from the ones I've heard, the Brahms (particularly 1st movement) is the most diffucult tecnically.

I'm sure that there has been a thread on this at some point, but I haven't found it, so...so...so there. (didn't know how to end that)

Thanks as always for the informative input.

Digi-M

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That's funny HKV I never really found the Glazunov that bad. The funny thing is out of all the concertos I have performed, Paganini 1,2&3, Wieniawski 1&2, Brahms, Tchaik, Sibelius, Dvorak etc. the one I still feel I have mastered or got a really good grip on is the Mendelssohn E minor. I don't know why, but the first movement of that concerto is the biggest pain in my rear end. It is the one concerto to this day I wont perform with any orchestra. Even with or without my finest instrument!!

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On my Gagliano, I don't need a lot of bow pressure to get a solid tone. Nor do I need to lean into the violin to make clear bow changes.

So when playing the Glazunov, I can play the concerto SLOWER because the violin stays with me at every turn.

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In some ways, the Mozart concerti are the most difficult, because they are so exposed and pure. Every little schmutzes count. Whereas in bigger romantic works, tiny intonation slips and bow scratches are not as exposed, especially one is playing with an orchestra.

Toscha

[This message has been edited by Toscha (edited 07-27-2000).]

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Originally posted by HuangKaiVun:

On my Gagliano, I don't need a lot of bow pressure to get a solid tone. Nor do I need to lean into the violin to make clear bow changes.

--------------------------------------

Oh! You have got a real Gagliano? That's really fantastic!

Do you mind if you can tell me how much did you spend on it? (Tell me secretly if you don't want others to know)

Thanks so much!

Guarneri del Gesu

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In my experience, the most difficult works are not the "most difficult", like Wieniawski, Paganini, etc. The 2nd movement of Bach E major, I find so difficult... mostly because of the emotional content. To play fast things is easy. To play something that deep... it requires maturity. Being able to master this movement, that`s a challenge to me.

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for me at least, i've found wieniawski to be consistently difficult in his technical feats (from his concertos to smaller pieces, polonaise, scherzo, etc.)

recently i've been having a bit of trouble with bruch con no.1 3rd movt., mainly the triplets. i think your violin really needs to have a sensitive touch to respond to all the notes, even when in a high position, which my violin unfortunately lags. maybe new strings may help?

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I've heard Tochsa's argument before about the Mozart concerti. I am learning one now, and am nowhere near a Wieniawski, Tchaik, etc. but to perfect the Mozart could be just as hard as playing the others well.

A friend of mine recently had her senior solo on the Mozart 5. She's a great violinist, but with how exposed the Mozart was I didn't think the audience was hearing her full playing potential.

DM

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At lower levels, fast=hard

The best players, though, will tell you that the slow movements and pieces are the hardest to master.

Just sort of a new take on what Klaus said.

DM

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of course slow pieces are hard! but it's not fair to say that for "beginners" fast=hard. because the matter of the fact is, the standard repertoire (many fast) that is wieniawski and paganini continue to challenge violinists, pro and amateur, even today. i don't think you can get any violinist to say that the allegro from wieniawski's con no.2 is "easy", because it's not. "fast" music can be immensely difficult.

and the same thing with slow music, because it deals with the issues of maturity and musicality which are hard to develop. for the same reason, some consider the beethoven concerto (rather moderate tempo thoroughout) to be one of the hardest pieces in the world (sarah chang has refused to record this piece because she realizes she doesn't have the maturity required to play it), though it is certainly no virtuoso showcase.

everything is hard; to play anything WELL is a challenge. and i don't think you can pigeonhole and say that slow pieces are harder than fast pieces because they are difficult in their own ways.

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quote:

Originally posted by HuangKaiVun:

Still, the hardest concertos are the atonal ones.

No matter how well you play, they sound terrible.

No matter how great their composers think they are, they STILL sound terrible.

ROFL that was very humorous.

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