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Changing positions


Nihad
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I need help on these issues so if you could help me...please do:

1. What do you think is the best way to practice scales. I know how important scales are but I never had much progres in practicing them.

2. I have a lot of trouble in changing positions (especialy in scales) and making big "jumps". I am stuck with the first etude in Sevcik opus 8

and this practice doesn't help me at all. Am I doing it wrong?

Thank you!

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These are questions best answered via observation of your technique and listening to your playing rather than via e-mail. I would advise you to ask your teacher. If you do not have a regular teacher, at least try to find an opportunity to play for someone whose playing you admire and ask their advice based on their observations of your playing. If you develop faulty technique in shifting positions, it can be very difficult to re-learn correctly. Good luck!

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: I need help on these issues so if you could help me...please do:

: 1. What do you think is the best way to practice scales. I know how important scales are but I never had much progres in practicing them.

: 2. I have a lot of trouble in changing positions (especialy in scales) and making big "jumps". I am stuck with the first etude in Sevcik opus 8

: and this practice doesn't help me at all. Am I doing it wrong?

: Thank you!

I believe that often the problem in changing positions is in not being sure where you are going -- rather rather than a problem of how to get there. Often the most valuable thing one can do is to practice etudes in the various positions. With my students I use a marvelous book of etudes in positions 1 through five by Dancla. I have also used the position etudes by Sitt, which I find rather boring and unmusical although technically useful. On a more advanced level the etudes by Campagnoli in the positions (1 through 7) are magnificent. Of course there's always Sevcik if you can stand it. Personally, I can't abide it.

Practicing the position etudes should embed a secure kinesthetic memory of the arm, elbow, hand and finger positions in each of positions on each of the four strings. Then the shifting should be no great problem.

the only thing to remember is LIGHT FINGERS. Even a little bit of finger pressure will ruin it for you.

Best wishes.

Roy Sonne

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: I need help on these issues so if you could help me...please do:

: 1. What do you think is the best way to practice scales. I know how important scales are but I never had much progres in practicing them.

: 2. I have a lot of trouble in changing positions (especialy in scales) and making big "jumps". I am stuck with the first etude in Sevcik opus 8

: and this practice doesn't help me at all. Am I doing it wrong?

: Thank you!

Nihad

In response to your question about scales and shifting, other responders gave good advice for shifting.

Might I suggest that a good solid ability in playing scales of all sorts results in solid confidence in shifting in all positions.

If you can achieve a one octave scale on each string, beginning with the open string, and progressing with first finger up each succeeding note, you will gain a command of the shifts all the way up each string.

You first practice scales using one finger, then two, then three then four. It constantly alters your shifting, offering the position changes in every possible combination. I have found that it worked very well for me.

The next step to master a three octave scale, in a variety of fingerings and "routes up and down". Once you have this comfortably in your technical arsenal, you can use that three octave scale to improve your bowing by breaking the scale down to two notes per bow, than three, four, six, eight, twelve and twenty four.

With practice and control, you will be able to take that three octave scale up and down on one bow, with tolerably good tone.

You aim for smooth line, even tone, no breaks in sound. One should never underestimate the power of solid scale technique.

You gain terrific mastery of the bow, and the confidence that you can play any amount of notes under a slur without stress.

The Carl Flesch scale book is a marvel of suggestions, through all the keys, of different fingering patterns, and scale work outs.

And you don't need to stay glued to the book, but use it for ideas that you can work on. I prefer to work on my scales without books, so I can focus on accuracy of sound.

You didn't mention how long you have been playing, but it has been my experience that those players who pay attention to their scale work do become stronger players.

I hope this helps.

Louise

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: These are questions best answered via observation of your technique and listening to your playing rather than via e-mail. I would advise you to ask your teacher. If you do not have a regular teacher, at least try to find an opportunity to play for someone whose playing you admire and ask their advice based on their observations of your playing. If you develop faulty technique in shifting positions, it can be very difficult to re-learn correctly. Good luck!

Thank you for your responses!

I would just like to say a few things.

-----------

For Louise:

I have been playing violin for 8 years with a 4-year pause (because of the war). I am playing scales using Carl Flesch and I also think that it is very helpful.

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I appreciate your advices and I would like to comment a remark of CDN who also answered to the question above. I know that the only way to actualy solve

problems is practicing, but it is always helpful to hear what other people have to say about it. Sometimes we need inspiration and options because we lack experience.

I have read the messages CDN wrote in reply to other questions and I find them most helpful. I was glad to receive a reply from CDN as well.

I will probably ask more questions in the future because I am know deciding whether I will continue playing violin seriously wich means that I would give up

any other education. I would then study music in stead of studying humanities. That is a big step to take so I need to make clear whether I am capable of playing violin in a

Professional way or not.

So I am looking forward to hearing from you all....if that is OK with you.

Once again,

Thank you!

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Hi Nihad! Good to see you back on M-net! I think

you need to ask yourself "do I love my music enough

and do I have the drive and dedication to see it

to 'professional' status? Talent is a plus in

any artistic endeavor, but lacking a love of one's

art and lacking the drive and motivation to

perfect it to the best of one's ability will

prevent one from reaching their goals. If you

truly know you love the violin and WANT to play

professionally, you will find the means by which

to do it. I wish you the best in what ever

manner you choose to pursue the violin.

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