Jump to content

Thicknessing calipers


doug
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone!

Could someone please tell me where I can find a relatively inexpensive set of thicknessing calipers? I don't have the $250 to shell out for the .0001" accuracy model at the present. I would like a set that is large enough for violin and cello though. Thanks a lot!

Doug

Link to comment
Share on other sites

: Hello everyone!

: Could someone please tell me where I can find a relatively inexpensive set of thicknessing calipers? I don't have the $250 to shell out for the .0001" accuracy model at the present. I would like a set that is large enough for violin and cello though. Thanks a lot!

:

: Doug

Doug,

I faced the same problem long ago. I solved it by buying an inexpensive dial indicator from Harbor Freight Company ( about $20) and mounting in on a wooden arm directly above a 1/4 inch dowel with a rounded off point on it. Set the indicator to zero with its stylus resting on the dowel and you have a very effective way to measure anything inserted between. By making the arm long, it serves for anything from a bass to a 1/32 violin. If you are handy with metal, you can make a more sophisticated version almost as easily. There is absolutel;y no reason for accuracy beyond .01", so don't worry about a high quality indicator. After all, Strad and his contemporaries were much more severely limited in their measuring ability. I use a conventional instrument caliper now, and it is handier, but if I hadn't traded for it, I'd still be using the homemade job. Something in me rebels at the obscene prices asked for simple tools. My first finger plane was a 32mm wooden bodied one that I made. I'd still be using it, too, if I hadn't lost it. Now I use brass-bodied professional tools that I don't like nearly as well.

Jake

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:Jake has the right approach for those that find merit in this kind of thing. You might want to try another source for your dial indicators such as; MSC Supply, Production tool Supply or even Enco manufacturing. They offer a wider range of these "import" indicators and they also offer them in inch or metric format.

Best of Luck, Greg

: : Hello everyone!

: : Could someone please tell me where I can find a relatively inexpensive set of thicknessing calipers? I don't have the $250 to shell out for the .0001" accuracy model at the present. I would like a set that is large enough for violin and cello though. Thanks a lot!

: :

: : Doug

: Doug,

: I faced the same problem long ago. I solved it by buying an inexpensive dial indicator from Harbor Freight Company ( about $20) and mounting in on a wooden arm directly above a 1/4 inch dowel with a rounded off point on it. Set the indicator to zero with its stylus resting on the dowel and you have a very effective way to measure anything inserted between. By making the arm long, it serves for anything from a bass to a 1/32 violin. If you are handy with metal, you can make a more sophisticated version almost as easily. There is absolutel;y no reason for accuracy beyond .01", so don't worry about a high quality indicator. After all, Strad and his contemporaries were much more severely limited in their measuring ability. I use a conventional instrument caliper now, and it is handier, but if I hadn't traded for it, I'd still be using the homemade job. Something in me rebels at the obscene prices asked for simple tools. My first finger plane was a 32mm wooden bodied one that I made. I'd still be using it, too, if I hadn't lost it. Now I use brass-bodied professional tools that I don't like nearly as well.

: Jake

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...