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Memorizing Praeludium +Allegro


Caren
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HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

Caren

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:Dear Caren,

You sure can have a lot of sympathy from me.

That is a real dilemma.It sounds like you

are experiencing a mental block, no suprise

due to the added pressure of the competition.

The best thing to do might be to put it away

for a few days.

Yesterday my violin teacher let my play a piece

while walking to the rythm. Start walking as

fast as the tempo goes, then start to play when you have

your walking tempo down. This helped me for one thing

because I was so busy with my feet that I stopped

worrying about my fingers, and they did their

own thing automatically.

To get over a mental block, Glen Gould once played

a piece while the TV and the radio were on full

blast- so he couldn't hear himself making mistakes..

One book suggestion which adresses the problem

of mental blocks ect.: The Inner Game of Music.

(Forgot the author)

Good luck, and tell us how it went!

Melinda

HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

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: :Dear Caren,

:

: You sure can have a lot of sympathy from me.

: That is a real dilemma.It sounds like you

: are experiencing a mental block, no suprise

: due to the added pressure of the competition.

: The best thing to do might be to put it away

: for a few days.

: Yesterday my violin teacher let my play a piece

: while walking to the rythm. Start walking as

: fast as the tempo goes, then start to play when you have

: your walking tempo down. This helped me for one thing

: because I was so busy with my feet that I stopped

: worrying about my fingers, and they did their

: own thing automatically.

: To get over a mental block, Glen Gould once played

: a piece while the TV and the radio were on full

: blast- so he couldn't hear himself making mistakes..

: One book suggestion which adresses the problem

: of mental blocks ect.: The Inner Game of Music.

: (Forgot the author)

: Good luck, and tell us how it went!

: Melinda

I sympathize also. Tough piece to memorize. My daughter has been working on this piece, but didn't

have to memorize it.

The book, "The Inner Game of Music" was also recomended to me after I totally bombed in my very

first recital. I had only been playing for three months at the time which was most likely too

soon to try, but my teacher wanted me to give it a shot. After that, I promised myself I would

be much more prepared for a recital than I was for that one. "Inner Game" is written by Barry

Green and Timothy Gallwey and published by Doubleday. I ordered it from Barnes and Noble. The

isbn is 0-385-23126-1. It has a lot of discussion on the mental aspects of performing.

Good luck--I'll keep my fingers crossed for you, except when I am practicing, of course.

Claire

:

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: :Dear Caren,

:

: You sure can have a lot of sympathy from me.

: That is a real dilemma.It sounds like you

: are experiencing a mental block, no suprise

: due to the added pressure of the competition.

: The best thing to do might be to put it away

: for a few days.

: Yesterday my violin teacher let my play a piece

: while walking to the rythm. Start walking as

: fast as the tempo goes, then start to play when you have

: your walking tempo down. This helped me for one thing

: because I was so busy with my feet that I stopped

: worrying about my fingers, and they did their

: own thing automatically.

: To get over a mental block, Glen Gould once played

: a piece while the TV and the radio were on full

: blast- so he couldn't hear himself making mistakes..

: One book suggestion which adresses the problem

: of mental blocks ect.: The Inner Game of Music.

: (Forgot the author)

: Good luck, and tell us how it went!

: Melinda

I sympathize also. Tough piece to memorize. My daughter has been working on this piece, but didn't

have to memorize it.

The book, "The Inner Game of Music" was also recomended to me after I totally bombed in my very

first recital. I had only been playing for three months at the time which was most likely too

soon to try, but my teacher wanted me to give it a shot. After that, I promised myself I would

be much more prepared for a recital than I was for that one. "Inner Game" is written by Barry

Green and Timothy Gallwey and published by Doubleday. I ordered it from Barnes and Noble. The

isbn is 0-385-23126-1. It has a lot of discussion on the mental aspects of performing.

Good luck--I'll keep my fingers crossed for you, except when I am practicing, of course.

Claire

:

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: :Dear Caren,

:

: You sure can have a lot of sympathy from me.

: That is a real dilemma.It sounds like you

: are experiencing a mental block, no suprise

: due to the added pressure of the competition.

: The best thing to do might be to put it away

: for a few days.

: Yesterday my violin teacher let my play a piece

: while walking to the rythm. Start walking as

: fast as the tempo goes, then start to play when you have

: your walking tempo down. This helped me for one thing

: because I was so busy with my feet that I stopped

: worrying about my fingers, and they did their

: own thing automatically.

: To get over a mental block, Glen Gould once played

: a piece while the TV and the radio were on full

: blast- so he couldn't hear himself making mistakes..

: One book suggestion which adresses the problem

: of mental blocks ect.: The Inner Game of Music.

: (Forgot the author)

: Good luck, and tell us how it went!

: Melinda

I sympathize also. Tough piece to memorize. My daughter has been working on this piece, but didn't

have to memorize it.

The book, "The Inner Game of Music" was also recomended to me after I totally bombed in my very

first recital. I had only been playing for three months at the time which was most likely too

soon to try, but my teacher wanted me to give it a shot. After that, I promised myself I would

be much more prepared for a recital than I was for that one. "Inner Game" is written by Barry

Green and Timothy Gallwey and published by Doubleday. I ordered it from Barnes and Noble. The

isbn is 0-385-23126-1. It has a lot of discussion on the mental aspects of performing.

Good luck--I'll keep my fingers crossed for you, except when I am practicing, of course.

Claire

:

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: HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

You know what? I really like this piece. I practised it very hard before my audition, and I found that it just came along my head very easily.

The real trick, I think, is that I listen to the piece everyday. I borrowed CDs, and listened to different violinists' style and interpretations of the piece. If you listen to it often, you will get it. Trust me, it'll just come to your head.

I would like to discuss with you how you interpret the work too. I am a self-studying violin student, so I want to know your fingerings and bowings and other technical stuff.

Hope you'll do well at the competition!

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: HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

You know what? I really like this piece. I practised it very hard before my audition (unforunately I got turned down!), and I found that it just came along my head very easily.

The real trick, I think, is that I listened to the piece everyday. I borrowed CDs, and listened to different violinists' style and interpretations of the piece. If you listen to it often enough, you will get it. Trust me, it'll just come naturally to your head.

I would like to discuss with you how you interpret the work too. I am a self-studying violin student, so I want to know your fingerings and bowings and other technical stuff.

Hope you'll do well at the competition!

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Share on other sites

: HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

You know what? I really like this piece. I practised it very hard before my audition (unforunately I got turned down!), and I found that it just came along my head very easily.

The real trick, I think, is that I listened to the piece everyday. I borrowed CDs, and listened to different violinists' style and interpretations of the piece. If you listen to it often enough, you will get it. Trust me, it'll just come naturally to your head.

I would like to discuss with you how you interpret the work too. I am a self-studying violin student, so I want to know your fingerings and bowings and other technical stuff.

Hope you'll do well at the competition!

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The tricks to memorize this piece (also apply to other pieces) are:

1. Listen to the cadenza and find its pattern. There is a pattern to it.

2. Use first finger as your guide note. Shift to the new position with your first finger. This will help you get the intonation right also.

3. Practise SLOW many times then increase the speed to medium speed then at tempo.

4. Work on the cadenza alone. Don't try to play the whole piece straight through.

I hope the above tips will help you. Have fun with this piece.

Bill T.

: HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

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Caren..

I remember when I was young I once played this piece.

It is certainly quite hard, but I'm sure that soon

enough you will have the knack of it.

I'll give you a good piece of advice, Purchase

a recording of it and listen to the piece at LEAST

once a day.

Soon enough you will have the piece stuck in your

head and it should just flow when you play it.

Hope this helps.

Yana.

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: HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: Caren

:

Yana Wells said listen to a recording of it at least once a day....hell, i say put it on REPEAT!!

I ALWAYS think of the Cadenza in triplets....there's no co-ordination needed with the piano, so there's

no problem. Afterall, as u said, all the piano is doing is rumbling underneath.

And for the cadenza...there's a fingering pattern...if u didn't already know that, check it out =>

G'lucK!!! =>

Brandon Chui

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: : HELP! I'm going crazy trying to memorize Praeludium and Allegro by Kreisler. It's at the point where I make a different mistake every time I play it. I know some mistakes are mental- I start wondering if I can remember this section, or I try to tell my fingers where to go and they won't listen. Sometimes my fingers keep going but I have no idea where I am, other times I know exactly what I should be doing but it's like the connection between my my head and my fingers got cut... Sometimes when I play it, it's fine, and I think "Oh, good, I've finally got this nailed," and then the next time I play it I get totally mixed up. The "cadenza" where the piano just sits and rumbles underneath is the worst. It's written in fours but likes to go into triplets when it goes fast. My teacher says this is okay, but the rythem change gets me mixed up. I've practiced it in double stops, triplets, EVERYTHING, and I may go nuts if it I can't consistently play it for memory. I know it's possible to memorize this because I've

: : heard other people play it! I usually find memorizing pretty easy. Is it normal to have trouble memorizing this piece? I have to play this in a competition in two weeks, and yes, the memory is compulsery. Does anybody have some tips or at least some sympathy?

: : Caren

: :

: Yana Wells said listen to a recording of it at least once a day....hell, i say put it on REPEAT!!

: I ALWAYS think of the Cadenza in triplets....there's no co-ordination needed with the piano, so there's

: no problem. Afterall, as u said, all the piano is doing is rumbling underneath.

: And for the cadenza...there's a fingering pattern...if u didn't already know that, check it out =>

: G'lucK!!! =>

: Brandon Chui

Listening is the key -- My son listened to it all night on repeat for a couple of weeks -- he had it basically

memorized before he started to play it.

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