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Non-destructive E string tuners


David
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No matter how careful one is with bridge adjustments, at some point or other everyone (OK, nearly everyone) has a catastrophic bridge collapse.

Is there any kind of E string fine tuner that doesn't manage to ding or gouge the top plate in a collapse?

Does anybody have and like the Midget 2 prong adjuster (no. 1230) shown in the Shar catalog?

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i have the tuner you describe, and it probably will not damage the wood, but the hook is much too thin and i have had several strings break. there aren't any burrs, or other defects that i can see. if you use one, try a small piece of chammois or one of those string tube things to keep this from happening.

mike

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I would recomend a graphite tail-piece with built in adjusters. The underside of adjustment lever is smooth and rounded, so that if the bridge colapses, it does not dig into the table like the single, metal adjusters do. They are also much lighter than wood tail-pieces, and have a good tonal quality to them.

steve

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I have only been able to find the wooden ones with the carbon-fiber tuners for around $120.

: I would recomend a graphite tail-piece with built in adjusters. The underside of adjustment lever is smooth and rounded, so that if the bridge colapses, it does not dig into the table like the single, metal adjusters do. They are also much lighter than wood tail-pieces, and have a good tonal quality to them.

: steve

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Are the tuners any different than the ones in the other wooden tailpieces with built in fine tuners? The one that I have has a screw pushing against a flat plate which holds the ball end of the string. I wouldn't bet on it not gouging the top if the bridge collapsed.

jeffs

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Hey....The week it got to me I destroyed my knee skiing, and I was so doped up I never even open the box. After that I went to Florida for 7 weeks so I could recover where it is warm instead of here in Tahoe. I am going to string it this afternoon and see how it fits. I have a plan for a Gaspar daSalo tail-piece which I will be making this week. I will send you one in return.

thanks

steve g.

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: i have the tuner you describe, and it probably will not damage the wood, but the hook is much too thin and i have had several strings break. there aren't any burrs, or other defects that i can see. if you use one, try a small piece of chammois or one of those string tube things to keep this from happening.

: mike

Thanks for the advice.

Apparently there are two styles of "midget" tuners. The single pronged "Hill style," which has the small hook with the sharp edges, and a double pronged style which will take either a looped E or a ball E.

Shar Products carries is their catalog some E loop protectors that slip onto the single pronged tuner to help prevent breakage of the loop. The double pronged tuner does not require these protectors as the tension is evenly distributed over the two prongs.

Both of these ?midget? tuners seem as though they would cause the least amount of damage to the top plate from a bridge collapse.

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You have got to be kidding, you mean to tell me that you are for real!!!!!? Perhaps if you take up the Ukelin you can rest assured that you won't have to deal with that problem again.

: No matter how careful one is with bridge adjustments, at some point or other everyone (OK, nearly everyone) has a catastrophic bridge collapse.

: Is there any kind of E string fine tuner that doesn't manage to ding or gouge the top plate in a collapse?

: Does anybody have and like the Midget 2 prong adjuster (no. 1230) shown in the Shar catalog?

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i will agree (impoliteness aside) that just as an olympic biathlon competitor checks his rifle before each trial, a musician (especially a string player)needs to look over their instrument. i am continually amazed at how many people simply miss warped bridges, open seams, pegbox cracks, etc.

mike

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Fine instruments often have very thin, delicate bridges that are quite capable of tipping over.

In reality, I do not have this problem, the previous owner of my violin did. I did not hold that against selecting this instrument since it has superior tone! Perhaps he or she should have taken up the "ukelin" [sic].

: You have got to be kidding, you mean to tell me that you are for real!!!!!? Perhaps if you take up the Ukelin you can rest assured that you won't have to deal with that problem again.

: : No matter how careful one is with bridge adjustments, at some point or other everyone (OK, nearly everyone) has a catastrophic bridge collapse.

: : Is there any kind of E string fine tuner that doesn't manage to ding or gouge the top plate in a collapse?

: : Does anybody have and like the Midget 2 prong adjuster (no. 1230) shown in the Shar catalog?

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Horses are for bow hair, not beating to death with this issue. So here are my final comments on bridges and fine tuners.

A difficult situation is a thin, high bridge that is in constant need of straightening and untwisting--and I?m referring to small preventative adjustments, not trying to undo a forty-five degree slant toward that peg box with a thirty degree twist after months of neglect. If the E string has broken and one attempts adjustments before installing a new E (that requires a rubber washer type tone filter which limits the amount of adjustment that can be done on that side of the bridge after installing the E), it is very easy to tip over the bridge toward the tailpiece in trying to nudge it one or two degrees back to vertical. This VERY NEARLY happened to me once and only a firm hold saved the day. (Yes, I had taken the precaution of folding up a cleaning cloth and slipping it under the tailpiece.) It had already happened to my violin's previous owner(s) judging from the tell tail dings under the tailpiece. I am reluctant to have my local luthier make a new bridge with wider, more stable feet since I am pleased with my instrument?s tone.

That luthiers and string manufacturers aim sharp metal projectiles under tension at delicate wood, that bridges can collapse with even the most gentle care in adjustment, are certainly areas for legitimate concern.

: i will agree (impoliteness aside) that just as an olympic biathlon competitor checks his rifle before each trial, a musician (especially a string player)needs to look over their instrument. i am continually amazed at how many people simply miss warped bridges, open seams, pegbox cracks, etc.

: mike

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Arn't certain people caustic, crude and not socially skilled - No kidding !

: Fine instruments often have very thin, delicate bridges that are quite capable of tipping over.

: In reality, I do not have this problem, the previous owner of my violin did. I did not hold that against selecting this instrument since it has superior tone! Perhaps he or she should have taken up the "ukelin" [sic].

: : You have got to be kidding, you mean to tell me that you are for real!!!!!? Perhaps if you take up the Ukelin you can rest assured that you won't have to deal with that problem again.

: : : No matter how careful one is with bridge adjustments, at some point or other everyone (OK, nearly everyone) has a catastrophic bridge collapse.

: : : Is there any kind of E string fine tuner that doesn't manage to ding or gouge the top plate in a collapse?

: : : Does anybody have and like the Midget 2 prong adjuster (no. 1230) shown in the Shar catalog?

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