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Learned Perfect Pitch?


Walter
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I can say that I have developed a slight sense of absolute pitch, although it certainly isn't complete. I can sing E-flats and As pretty much on pitch without a reference note, and I can usually recognize and A when I hear one. I'm still working on David Burge's perfect pitch course, but I've had lots of problems finding a partner who will stick with it and I'm far from being done. I do expect to develop full perfect pitch eventually (I'll post when I do!).

Victor

: I have searched all the old postings concerning Perfect Pitch and Ear Training - but I would very much like to hear from someone who actually achieved Perfect Pitch themselves - or through some course. Is there such a person?

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I can sing notes on pitch without a reference note. The only thing is, I have to sing some notes an octave lower because I can't hit the high notes. The problem is, I think that the way I learned you have to start before you are 8 or 9 years old and it's easiest before you are 7.

My teacher had my mother hold up a card with one note on it. I had to identify the note by singing it on pitch and then check myself on my violin -- so I learned to read notes this way, too. My mother had a keyboard nearby which was tuned to A-440 and she also checked me because when you are really little, sometimes you don't play the notes on pitch. We added notes one at a time and she mixed them up so that I never had a reference note to start with. I can also sing intervals from learning this way, although not quite as well. I stopped doing the notecards I think when I was about 7 or 7 1/2, but now, if my mother says sing an e flat or an a#, I can do it with no problem.

Bobby

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Yup, I'm one of the persons your are looking for. But I learned it in a hard way. When I was young, I didn't have an electronic piano or autotuner. Violin is the only instrument I play, therefore the perfect pitch is based on the scales of just intonation (not tempered scale). The trick is that you must try to memorize what you hear. I also self-taught the consonant intervals such as unison, octave, perfect 5th, perfect 4th, major 6th,

major 3rd, and min.6th and 3rd. Another very important thing is that you should play a violin having very "clean" sound. By clean I mean the tone should be ideally pure harmonic, i.e., the tone should be composed of the fundamental frequency, and double, triple, etc. (i.e., harmonics). The other non-harmonic components should be as low in intensity as possible.

Perfect pitch does create problems sometimes. I was invited some years ago to play chamber music in someones basement. We were forced to tune to that A of the piano which had not been tuned for over 10 years in that humid basement. After played a few notes, I gave up. Every one looked at me, "what's matter with you?" If I tried hard, I probably would adapt to the relative

pitch environment.

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One of the interesting things (well to me anyway) about playing early music is that A can be incredibly variable - some days we might be expected to play A=415, some days A=425, other days A=430. Perfect pitch would make this a nightmare!

Lenny

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