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Chinrest question


robert
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I have a square shaped face. So, when I support violin with

chin, I use the front part of the chin to make contact with

the chinrest, rather than the side part. Using the side part

gives me discomfort on my chin. The disadvantage of using the

front part of the chin is that I feel strain on my neck and chin

easily, since I have to press harder on the chinrest. I would

like to know what types of chinrest I should use for my case, so

that I can play violin with more comfort.

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I believe you can do injury to yourself by straining any part of your body when playing the violin, and neck problems can affect your entire body. So you must make it as comfortable as possible. The law of gravity is immutable and can only be countered with proper support.

I think you should examine as many types of chinrest as possible until you find one that lets you hold the instrument easily and properly. I would go to a top violin shop for advice and to try different styles. In the last analysis, you may have to carve an existing chinrest to fit you, or at least to modify an existing one. Some luthiers will do this-for a price.

Chinrest shapes have changed a lot in the bast 20-30 years (even for styles with the old names) as production has moved very far out of Europe to the east (or is it the west?)

My own chosen style (Stuber, which is definitely not for the square-jawed, or almost anyone else, for that matter), has changed so much (I own 4 of them, but wanted a 5th), that after returning 4 over the past few years, I have finally kept a new rosewood Stuber chinrest and have been carving it to fit myself. I've already removed half the wood- and I'm just "almost there." If you are going to carve, boxwood is the softest wood, but has to be "colored" with nitric acid vapor after all carving and sanding are done to obtain the typical color found on violin parts - definitely not something to do in the house. Next easiest os rosewood; ebony is the hardest.

Good Luck.

Andy

: I have a square shaped face. So, when I support violin with

: chin, I use the front part of the chin to make contact with

: the chinrest, rather than the side part. Using the side part

: gives me discomfort on my chin. The disadvantage of using the

: front part of the chin is that I feel strain on my neck and chin

: easily, since I have to press harder on the chinrest. I would

: like to know what types of chinrest I should use for my case, so

: that I can play violin with more comfort.

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Hi Andy,

Many people use Clariol hair dye for the wood- leaving out the conditioning part. I think it would be better than using a harsh acid. Or you can leave the wood bare and let it naturally age into the wonderful boxwood color that we all love.

Daniel

: I believe you can do injury to yourself by straining any part of your body when playing the violin, and neck problems can affect your entire body. So you must make it as comfortable as possible. The law of gravity is immutable and can only be countered with proper support.

: I think you should examine as many types of chinrest as possible until you find one that lets you hold the instrument easily and properly. I would go to a top violin shop for advice and to try different styles. In the last analysis, you may have to carve an existing chinrest to fit you, or at least to modify an existing one. Some luthiers will do this-for a price.

: Chinrest shapes have changed a lot in the bast 20-30 years (even for styles with the old names) as production has moved very far out of Europe to the east (or is it the west?)

: My own chosen style (Stuber, which is definitely not for the square-jawed, or almost anyone else, for that matter), has changed so much (I own 4 of them, but wanted a 5th), that after returning 4 over the past few years, I have finally kept a new rosewood Stuber chinrest and have been carving it to fit myself. I've already removed half the wood- and I'm just "almost there." If you are going to carve, boxwood is the softest wood, but has to be "colored" with nitric acid vapor after all carving and sanding are done to obtain the typical color found on violin parts - definitely not something to do in the house. Next easiest os rosewood; ebony is the hardest.

: Good Luck.

: Andy

: : I have a square shaped face. So, when I support violin with

: : chin, I use the front part of the chin to make contact with

: : the chinrest, rather than the side part. Using the side part

: : gives me discomfort on my chin. The disadvantage of using the

: : front part of the chin is that I feel strain on my neck and chin

: : easily, since I have to press harder on the chinrest. I would

: : like to know what types of chinrest I should use for my case, so

: : that I can play violin with more comfort.

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Share on other sites

: I believe you can do injury to yourself by straining any part of your body when playing the violin, and neck problems can affect your entire body. So you must make it as comfortable as possible. The law of gravity is immutable and can only be countered with proper support.

: I think you should examine as many types of chinrest as possible until you find one that lets you hold the instrument easily and properly. I would go to a top violin shop for advice and to try different styles. In the last analysis, you may have to carve an existing chinrest to fit you, or at least to modify an existing one. Some luthiers will do this-for a price.

: Chinrest shapes have changed a lot in the bast 20-30 years (even for styles with the old names) as production has moved very far out of Europe to the east (or is it the west?)

: My own chosen style (Stuber, which is definitely not for the square-jawed, or almost anyone else, for that matter), has changed so much (I own 4 of them, but wanted a 5th), that after returning 4 over the past few years, I have finally kept a new rosewood Stuber chinrest and have been carving it to fit myself. I've already removed half the wood- and I'm just "almost there." If you are going to carve, boxwood is the softest wood, but has to be "colored" with nitric acid vapor after all carving and sanding are done to obtain the typical color found on violin parts - definitely not something to do in the house. Next easiest os rosewood; ebony is the hardest.

: Good Luck.

: Andy

: : I have a square shaped face. So, when I support violin with

: : chin, I use the front part of the chin to make contact with

: : the chinrest, rather than the side part. Using the side part

: : gives me discomfort on my chin. The disadvantage of using the

: : front part of the chin is that I feel strain on my neck and chin

: : easily, since I have to press harder on the chinrest. I would

: : like to know what types of chinrest I should use for my case, so

: : that I can play violin with more comfort.

This is so true I think. Try a chinrest in the middle of the fiddle and see if that helps.

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