Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Vision Strings


K544
 Share

Recommended Posts

Well for one thing, they are long lasting and don't go false even after 6 months. I have a set where I have been tightening, loosening, tightening, loosening, etc. due to my tweaking the afterlength, tailpieces, soundpost shifts, etc. to get rid of a wolf note. I've transferred them to several violins to see how they sound, and they are still brilliant and responsive, not dull. My Evah Pirazzi's lose their zip in a few weeks, and go false in about 2-3 months. Dominants go dull in that time-period. (and none of them have had the endless cycle of loosening, tightening, probably upwards of 30 times total), that these Vision mediums were subjected to. Today, I used the used Vision A as a replacement for an 6-month old Infeld Blue A that broke and it sounds great.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too must give credit to Thomastic for their Vision strings. Here in the UK I can get a set of Visions for half the price of Evah Pirazzi's and they seem to last longer. The Pirazzi's have the edge over Vision for volume but little else in my opinion but at twice the price I have ditched them in favour of the Visions. I also prefer Visions over Dominants.

Rob.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's back to Evah Pirazzi strings after a set of Vision Titanium. I didn't dislike the Vision strings but prefer EP. The only complaint about EP is that it can be almost a week before they settle down. Vision strings break in within a couple of hours. A set of Vision Titanium strings is slightly more expensive than a set of EP strings, $59.95 versus $53.27 at Shar. The Visions went six months before the A string winding went bad. That's about the same length of time that I get out of EP strings. Vision Titanium is marketed as a soloist string and seems to be aimed at maximizing volume and carrying power. That may not be your taste or suit your instrument. I suspect I would prefer the regular Visions and they cost less, $38.95.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are so widely available now, the distributors may feel that they no longer need to rely on that type of word-of-mouth marketing. However, because my local shop wasn't carrying the 1/2 size, they did send a sample to the shop on my behalf a couple weeks ago. (Haven't got the fiddle back yet, but I will report on the strings when I do.) I very much like them on my full size instrument.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tried Vision and Vision Titanium strings on about 5 violins. The Titaniums are remarkable on one of them, the regular Visions are better on the others. I've kept the Vision strings on all those violins. One exception - I substituted a medium Obligato A for the Vision (regular) on one violin to beef up that gutsy sound to match the D and G better. But that is purely personal and violin dependent.

I liked the Vision Ti E string also - BUT it did whistle and I've switched to Kaplan Solutions E which does not.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried the plain visions. I found the set to be extremely well balanced from string to string and the sound was nice and full-bodied from a distance. Under the ear, however, I felt they were a bit lacking in colour and complexity compared to other synthetics like Larsen, Obligato or Violino. Still, if I were performing a solo work against a medium to large orchestra I would probably choose the Visions over any other synthetics I have tried, since on my instrument and in my experience they are at their best from the listener's perspective.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, my experience also. Under the ear, the Visions seemed to lack some body, and have a slight edge, but from hearing others play, the sound floats out nice and round.

Now that they've been out a year or so, have they become the standard string over Dominants, or are people still using Dominants as the default. I've found the Visions to work better than Dominants for me, certainly more interesting, fast breakin, last longer. Since I have not stopped using my first set of Visions, and it's been going six months, I don't know what the maximum time they'll last. I also really like the Melange stark e-string that came with the promotion package (the one with the orange wrapping at the tail end, red at the peg end).

So my question to luthiers and shop owners is, are you now stringing your violins with Visions out the door, or still Dominant as the standard string?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote:

Thomastik was nice enough to send me a trial set of Vision strings (mediums), and, one good turn deserving another, I am happy to report that I think they are absolutely terrific strings, hands down the best I have ever used.


K544, What e-mail address did you use to receive your trial set of strings from Thomastik? I have been wanting to try them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used Vision in the past. I have gone back to Dominants: G, Silver D, A, with a Titanium E.

I say that Vision strings are Dominants to the second power. So if you need "MORE" than Dominants, try Vision. Personally, I like the pliable feeling of perlon core: easy on the fingertips and finger joints, relaxing for vibrato.

Once the humidity of summer goes away I might try gut - Eudoxas I think. I'll see if I can get a set from Pirastro.

Andrew - whistling E usually points to an ill-fitting soundpost or other setup problem. I was ready to ditch the Ti E because of whistling but a "reboot" of the violin setup cured the problem. This was discussed in a long, contentious thread in the Pegbox some months ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eudoxas are a big culture change from any synthetics. I use plain Eudoxas on the A, D and G string and I absolutely adore them. Once I got used to them, there was never any going back to synthetics. It's just possible to bring out incredible shades of colour, subtleties and articulation that you just can't achieve with synthetics. And if you think synthetics feel nice and soft and pliable, wait till you try Eudoxa!

All that said, on the downside in my opinion they require more finesse with the bow than synthetics - you have to think more about sounding point, bow pressure, speed, bow angle, stick rotation, etc than you do with synthetics. In order words, things you might get away with using synthetic you might not get away with the Eudoxas. Also, they don't have as much volume as synthetics, but on the other hand they have more dynamic range. Stability wise they aren't too bad - I might have to make a small adjustment in tuning a few times during a practice session, but the wonderful sound is well worth this inconvenience to me.

I would be musically very lost without my Eudoxas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone tried Vision Titanium Orchestra version?

I have a promo set, but haven't put it on yet, and I am curious...

I have tried both regular Visions and Titaniums. I like Titaniums over regular ones, but it's strictly a personal impression. Plus, it also as we all know depends on each individual instrument as well.

As far as gut strings, I totally like Oliv G (stiff) G and Gold D (medium) on my primary violin. They match up real well with Titanium A and Goldbrokat E.

ATB, Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glenn,

Jargar E strings are plain (unwound). I really don't think there is a definitive one-solution--fits all answer regarding whistling Es. For every success story I hear, I also hear another story that completely contradicts it. In my own experience, I do however believe that a low inertia wound E can potentially whistle less than an unwound one. My guess is this is because the "rougher" texture surface of the winding (as opposed to the smoother finish of plain steel or chromesteel), causes a faster and more complete "bite" when the bow first makes contact with the string. However, contrary to other people's observations, I have found that any gold plated steel E string I have tried (i.e Obligato gold, Oliv, Larsen gold) all share that characteristic too - that is, a better "bite" and response when the bow hits the string.

For me, I have found that the Pirastro Universal E, Pirastro Eudoxa and Pirastro Tonica are the ultimate in whistle-proofing, and sure enough they are all wound. Next comes the gold plated Es I mentioned above, but they don't whistle on my instrument either.

I will tell you what the ultimate whistler is on my violin though. The new Pirastro Wondertone Solo. Boy oh boy, it is the most amazing whistler I have come across. And the irony is that Pirastro market it as anti-whistle. It is the complete opposite in my experience! And interestingly, it has the smoothest shiniest surface texture of any E string I have ever seen. Which supports my theory that you need a bit of roughness in the string surface texture itself to help prevent whilsting.

At the moment I use an Obligato gold weich E with my Eudoxas on the A, D and G. I find it a good match to the Eudoxas and it has a nice, warm but brilliant, complex sound and is responsive. I choose the weich tension to better match the volume and feel of the Eudoxas. There is zero whilsting with this combination. Still, I know people for whom the Obligato gold E's whistle just as badly as the Wondertone Solo did with me. One person I know in this situation solved it by going to the Pirastro Universal E.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...