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magginicello
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As I know, the scroll saw is not necessary for the violin making. However, you could not cut the plates right on the line anyway, you will have to use other hand tools to finish it. A 14" bandsaw is a much useful tool. I will see what other to say about this scroll saw.

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I recently bought a vintage "Beaver Tools" scrollsaw off Ebay that I have used to cut out moulds, plate outlines and scroll blocks. It works extremely well, and I'm very pleased I bought it. I have access to a very high quality industrial bandsaw at work, and haven't felt the need to use this since I got the old beaver! Very important to select the right blade for the job,though.

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David tell that all, scroll saw will have difficulty on thick block such as neck. Bandsaw could do a lot of things and make life much easier. By the way, could anyone here tell me if I could use 14" bandsaw to cut my seasoned back to be a matched 2 pieces? What is the tips? or I have to send the maple back to a local lumber?

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Sorry to disagree, but I found it easier to cut a neck block (a bit slower but much more accurate and therefore less clean-up) with the scroll saw. And the cost of a >14inch bandsaw is surely prohibitive for many (most?) amateur makers? I think the scroll saw is a highly underrated tool.

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I was thinking the same thing for scrolls and that's why I asked the depth of cut.It would be handy having it around the shop if affordable.

I recently bought a little 10 inch Rexon mini bandsaw for my shop.

I was really surprised at it's cutting power and even got through a scroll with some struggle, but that's apparently because of the very low quality blades that come with it.with a proper blade I think it'll handle anything accept sawing ribs out of a larger piece of wood.

Has anyone else here used one of these saws?

[image]bs103vm.jpg[/image]

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I favor a bandsaw.

all the outline cuts are rough and MUST be finished with hand tools.

power is the advantage , to enable the art of the knife . It is a mistake to cut the final outline with a power tool. I wondered why my scrolls were lifeless, until I began finishing that outine with a chisel and rasp

Give me a 14" bandsaw with a 3/4" and a 1/4" blade.

corner blocks are cut with a gouge.

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Personally my choice would be a bandsaw. I've never seen a scroll saw with a fence or mitre gauge. Those things are very useful, especially for all the other stuff you end up making to make a violin. IMO with a bandsaw and drill press your all set in terms of machinery. Of course you can always cut out scrolls and resaw backs with hand tools but in my experience that's more like work and less like fun.

TSENGLO: You can resaw violin/viola backs with a 14" bandsaw no problemo. With a riser kit and a bigger blade you could do cellos, but most cello wood already comes sawn. I use a 1/4" 6tpi blade for everthing.

HongDa: My first bandsaw was just like that. I was able to resaw ribs with it after upgrading the blade.

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I have a scroll saw and a small bandsaw in my workshop, and a large bandsaw in a shed at the bottom of my garden. I bought the scroll saw some ten years before I ever owned a band saw because of very limited space, and have never regretted that choice. My scroll saw is far quieter then the band saw and for violin and viola scroll blocks much more accurate, for cello neck blocks you’ll not get away with a small bench top bandsaw anyway.

It’s not great for cutting out plates, but nor would the little bandssaw be and I find doing that with a coping saw by hand is no problem and plenty fast enough.

I still use the scroll saw over the band saw for making molds but where the band saw knocks the socks of the scroll saw is when it comes to opening up backs and cutting rib stock from a raw lump.

In the end it will come down to space, noise and what you want a power saw for, but I’d say don’t underestimate the use of a scroll saw, for me when I had a very small work space it was a far better first buy then a band saw.

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The great thing about my 8 inch bandsaw is that the blade is very thin. This means that I can get many more ribs out of a piece of rib stock than I a 14 inch bandsaw would produce.

Unfortunately, when you try to cut the outline of the plates on this little saw, you cannot move the plate like you need to for the whole outline. So, I now have a 14 inch bandsaw too.

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HongDa: It's hard to find good blades for that saw as most of the good aftermarket blades don't come in sizes that small. Instead try finding someone to make you a blade, usually places that do tool sharpening will also make bandsaw blades.

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I've got a 16" Delta variable speed scroll saw, and a cheap 8" Delta bandsaw. For years and years I only had the scroll saw and did lots of neat little projects (not violin related). But I got good at using the scroll saw. I found my scroll saw very useful for making lots of jigs and fixtures (often in the shape of a violin outline). With a good scroll saw, once you become talented and confident with it, you can dramatically reduce how much hand work you'll end up doing. I was able to cut my outlines in my fixtures to within 1/2 a mm or better.

How's this for craziness....I cut my f-holes with my scroll saw. First I drilled the holes on a thicknessed plate, and then scroll sawed to join the holes. It was a bit nerve racking, especially when close to the thin wings. I would NOT do it again, as I'm sure I wasn't far off from breaking a wing off.

My bandsaw is equally effective, but I find it's really only good for straight cuts. For example, you can zap off a million little blocks in no time flat for making the likes of little clamps.

My true love is with the scroll saw (even though straight cuts are rather difficult.

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John,

To be honest, it's a pic I grabbed from the net as I do not have a digital camera yet, but mine is close to that one.

If you are interested by making your own go here, you will find cool designs

http://216.106.57.170/~dielle/designs.html

other links

http://www.hyperkitten.com/woodworking/frame_saw.php3

http://www.geocities.com/plybench/index.html

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