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Bergonzi_Boy

Pirastro Olive E versus Obilgato gold E

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I am just wondering if people who have tried both the Pirastro Olive E and Pirastro Obligato gold plated E can answer a question for me. Are these two strings actually the same or different? The reason I ask is that Pirastro actually use the Gold Label E "rebadged" as their Violino E string, so I am wondering if they did similar and rebadged the Olive E as the gold plated Obligato E? Then again I have heard reports that the Obligato E is quite warm and subdued but the Olive E is very brilliant and clear. So I am not really sure. Thank you for any help.

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I can't directly answer your question, and I haven't tried the Violino E, but I'm convinced that the Obligato plain steel E is different from the Gold Label E--on the two violins I tried it on, it sounded quite a bit darker and fuller, compared to the brighter and clearer Gold Label E.

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Personally I do not use any gold plated strings.

it might sound "warm" but it is actually covering up some freqencies which limites the projection of the violin.

Just my opinion

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Hi T Rocca,

Well in my experience I share your opinion. I have tried two different gold plated Es (Obligato and Larsen) and I concur with your observations. Well, I can't attest to the comment about projection since I have not tested that, but certainly that is the feeling I get under the ear.

That's why I wanted to know if the Olive E was an altogether different string in terms of character. If it isn't, there wouldn't be much point me trying it, since I don't like the gold plated Es in general either.

Unfortunately I could name quite a few E strings that I really love - the plain Kaplan Steel, plain Larsen steel and Pirastro gold label just to name a few. But my skin acid is not kind to these strings and they don't last very long at all (week maximum), even with daily cleaning. I'm currently using the Pirastro Universal E, since it is chromesteel wound (hence it does not get wrecked by my fingers). But I really miss the pure sounds of the unwound strings. That's why I am wondering if the Olive is quite different to your average run-of-the-mill gold plated E.

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I see..

I used Oliv E a long time ago. cant remember the exact tone quality. But however in terms of life span, it doesnt last over a week or so too with heavy practicing.. so I guess in your case both strings will last out the same.. I would go for the better sounding one. just my opinion

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Hmm. I've never had problems with the gold wearing off on any gold E I've tried. I don't know if my bowing is different from yours or if my fingers are different with respect to acidity or sweat. But something's certainly different. The gold E's I've used have lasted months.

The Oliv E is definitely different from the Obligato E.

It's been a long time since I've used the Oliv E but I distinctly remember that I had squealing problems with the Obligato E when I switched to using Obligatos (which I eventually cured by switching to a different rosin). Prior to that, I was using the Oliv E and had no such problems.

I recall they sounded different, too but it's been too long so I can't remember any details. Sorry.

- Ray

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Ok, so this is really hazy memory so I could be very wrong but I seem to recall that the Oliv E had a purer cleaner tone whereas the Obligato E wasn't so much subdued as a little bit richer and warmer which fit better with the rest of the Obligato strings.

I didn't find the Obligato E subdued and I've certainly known some folks who have used it whose E strings don't sound subdued but strings work differently with different violins so you may have a different experience with it.

But again, this is really hazy memory so you should try and see what other people think, too. There have got to be a reasonable number of people who have played both E strings at some point.

- Ray

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Olivs and Obligatos have been the main strings I've been using on my violin. I switch back and forth between these 2 types of strings. The Obligato E sounds darker than the Oliv E. The Oliv E is even a much better match to the rest of the Obligato strings (G,D,A) than the Obligato E is. I prefer using Oliv E over the Obligato E.

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Quote:

It's been a long time since I've used the Oliv E but I distinctly remember that I had squealing problems with the Obligato E when I switched to using Obligatos (which I eventually cured by switching to a different rosin).


Say what?!? Inquiring minds want to know!: what rosin did you use before, and what did you switch to? This is the first time I've ever run across this potential contribution to a solution for the whistling E phenomenon. Over on the Peg Box there was recently a discussion about it -- the redoubtable Mr. Darnton was of the opinion that it was often (usually?) a soundpost issue. There were other comments as well, of course.

Joan

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I was using Larsen rosin (for no particular reason) and had used Synoxa and Tonicas both with the Oliv E. I switched to using Obligatos and that E string whistled a lot whereas the Oliv E, Evah Pirazzi E, and a number of other E strings that I had tried over some period time had not.

So I think Mr. Darnton is right that the soundpost is the probable cause for violins that have a tendency to whistle on the E string.

This case was different, though. This was a violin that didn't as a general rule whistle but did it only for that particular string (and perhaps a few others that I haven't tried :-).

In this case, I wound up trying a few different rosins and both the Liebenzeller Gold III and Tartini Symphony rosins worked to make the whistle go away. Both of them are slightly grippier than the Larsen but not too grippy.

- Ray

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I'd just like to thank everyone again for their contributions over the last day, especially rcc and JohnF. I've actually had an Olive E on an order to try when it arrives. So the latest posts have given me a bit more hope and I think it is at least worth trying. I am glad that it is indeed a different formulation string to the gold plated Obligato E. As for the wear rate of the string, my experience with the Obligato E (gold plated) was that it lasted fairly well on another violin, but at that time I only had a chance to practice a couple of hours every other day. Now I am currently practicing around 3 hours 6 days per week. As for squealing, I seem to be very lucky with this violin. I think it has only done it once, when I was trying to perfect a bariolage passage and the side of the first finger got ever so slightly in contact with the open string. Other than that, which was clearly "operator error", it has not occured. For whatever it is worth, I currently use a Universal E and Obligato rosin.

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Well I have had the Olive on the violin for about a week now. Firstly, I really like the sound - both under the ear and with recordings, although it slightly outpowers the other strings. I can confirm that it sounds nothing at all like any other gold plated E string I have tried. And no whistling whatseover, although I haven't ever really had the problem anyway.

As for wear, so far the gold plating does not show any obvious signs of corroding - but this is after only a week. If I can get even a month or two out of it I would be fairly happy. I do notice that the tension seems to be very high though - either that or the string itself is rather "hard" and inflexible. This is especially noticeable in the high positions on the E string. I would love to try the weich version of the string, plus doing this might help balance out the sound a bit better with the other strings. I just wonder how much that might improve the actual feel of the string though. An even thinner version of this string might even be less kind to the finger tips.

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Hi Bergonzi Boy--- A couple of weeks ago I tried the thin Olive E on a bright sounding violin. After 5 minutes of playing I had to take it off. It is thin, and the tension is much lower. It actually felt much easier on the fingers, but there was a definite lessening of response and projection on all the strings. Just my experience All best, Larry.

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Thanks for that feedback Guta. I wouldn't be surprised if the same thing will happen to me, although my violin is fairly "neutral" in tone. I do already have a thin one on order, so I'll post here once I get it. If it doesn't work, then I'll probably put up with the medium and just put up with the extra discomfort in the higher positions.

I'm also going to try that brand new Wondertone Solo E string that Pirastro has just put out. They claim it has far better corrosion / perspiration resistance properties than the existing Gold / Wondertone E. It would need to for me to bother, since I ruin a Gold label E in about two or three days.

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This is a bit off topic, but many have mentioned that their strings break down in a short time from perspiration etc. I have found that this can be remedied by rubbing a drop of olive oil into the strings once a day, before playing. Vaseline also works, or Badger Lip Balm, which contains wax. Cheers, Larry.

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I have a wonder tone HEAVY loop E with Medium EVAHs, they sounded good, but my luthier said a even higher tension Heavy Jargar will do better on my violin. I'm just posting this for case study reference.

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Well I just substituted the "thin" Olive E for the medium one I had on previously. The thin one is even better again! Suddenly the violin has opened up like it never has before and I am getting even more brilliance and a wonderful resonance. It does not seem to have effected the lower strings in any way. It seems the only side effect is a very slight loss of volume (which is what I was actually after so as to balance with the volume of the lower strings) and very slightly less richness. But it is barely detectable at all. A very small price to pay to perk up the violin the way it has!

It just goes to show yet again that the only way to know what a particular string or gauge will do for your violin is to try it yourself. Other people's experience, including mine, really only goes to show how variable the results of string testing are and what a black art it is.

How long this E will last is another question though, and I will probably still try the Wondertone Solo E when I get it.

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On 4/2/2005 at 8:01 AM, andy989 said:

I can't directly answer your question, and I haven't tried the Violino E, but I'm convinced that the Obligato plain steel E is different from the Gold Label E--on the two violins I tried it on, it sounded quite a bit darker and fuller, compared to the brighter and clearer Gold Label E.

 

Sorry guys, I know this is an old thread, but google brought me here! :lol:

I use Obligato with Gold Label E or Optima E (Heifetz's Lenzner). I've heard that Obligato plain steel E is the same as Violino E, but never anyone is absolutely sure if the Gold Label E is actually different from those two, they always say "I think it is". Does anyone know for sure? Because it would be way easier to just buy the set.

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8 hours ago, David27 said:

I've heard that Obligato plain steel E is the same as Violino E, but never anyone is absolutely sure if the Gold Label E is actually different from those two, they always say "I think it is". Does anyone know for sure? Because it would be way easier to just buy the set.

This page should answer your question:

https://www.pirastro.com/public_pirastro/pages/en/E-Strings/

Years ago, when I liked and used the Gold Label E, I'd often use the Obligato E instead, since it felt like the same string to me, and my local shop sold the Obligato E at a lower price than the Gold Label; years later, this page appears to confirm my suspicion.

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8 hours ago, devaraja42 said:

This page should answer your question:

https://www.pirastro.com/public_pirastro/pages/en/E-Strings/

Years ago, when I liked and used the Gold Label E, I'd often use the Obligato E instead, since it felt like the same string to me, and my local shop sold the Obligato E at a lower price than the Gold Label; years later, this page appears to confirm my suspicion.

I've seen that, it gave me even more doubts, it seems to be the same string because they are together at the same part of the table, but that doesn't mean they actually are. Many people say they're not, so weird...

What makes me doubt even more is, considering that information, Eudoxa, Gold, Obligato, Violino, Synoxa, Aricore, and Piranito are ALL the same E string.

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