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any good modern movies out there about violins?


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For fiction, also try Dudley Moore's "Unfaithfully Yours". It features the playing of Zukerman and is a truly great VIOLINt movie.

Nick Nolte/Barbara Streisand's "Prince of Tides" also had Zukerman's offstage dubbing and features a very evil violin husband of Streisand.

NY Philharmonic Concertmaster Glenn Dicterow can be heard on the movie "She-Devil".

There's also the "Hilary and Jackie" movie.

And who can forget Perlman's legendary playing in "Schindler's List".

As for MODERN documentaries, there's a beautiful one called "David Oistrakh, Artist of the People?" which puts all the previous movies to shame when it comes to drama and violining.

Same goes for Stern's award-winning China video and "Perlman in Moscow".

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If you go to see (or rent) the "Red Violin", do so with very low expectations (as I did) and you might be mildly entertained (as I was). It's truly a dreadful movie, but if you love violins there is just enough to hold your interest.

Another, much earlier movie (or perhaps 2) featured Heifitz playing himself, probably worth seeing. Also, Steven Staryk played the role of Vivaldi in a little-known movie that I never saw.

There a a couple of entertaining books that center on violins: "Antonietta" by John Hersey and "Canone Inverso" by Paulo Maurensig.

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The 1939 Heifetz movie was titled something like "They Shall Have Music."

It's the first movie I ever saw, at age 4-5, and only remembered it 30 years later as I saw it again on a 2am TV broadcast. In the days before VCRs we had to stay up all night to catch some of the really good movies.

The movie has Heifetz at his best and also some wonderful sequences of very fine young musicians - and a story too.

There was also a WW-II vintage movie called "Stagedoor Canteen" -that I have not been able to find on tape that featured Yehudi Menuhin (so I'm told).

Andy

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If you speak French or don't mind subtitles, "Un coeur en hiver" (1992, I think)was wonderful. Ravel music featured throughout with mamy scenes of violin-making and violin-faking. Below is a review from Leondard Maltin:

[[Fascinating study of what happens when two longtime business partners in the classical music world find their ``friendship'' split apart by the appearance of a beautiful young woman. All three stars shine in this talky, offbeat tale of love and music (specifically Ravel). An original film, admittedly not for all tastes.]]

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quote:

Originally posted by Ole Bull:

If you go to see (or rent) the "Red Violin", do so with very low expectations (as I did) and you might be mildly entertained (as I was). It's truly a dreadful movie, but if you love violins there is just enough to hold your interest.

shocked.gif I thought that the movie was INCREDIBLE!!! I am so proud of the Canadians who worked so hard on the movie. It is a real break through for Canadians in the movie making industry. Some parts of it were a bit boresome (the Chinese revolution part of it was very long but still having a great story to it) but I think it has to be looked at more in the light as a work of art rather than something to sit back and be mindlessly entertained.

The only complaints I would have of the movie would be to have used an actual 18th Century Italian instrument in the auction house rather then what looked like a factory-produced box with bad varnish. And it would have been nice if they had used a Canadian violinist like Jame Ehnes for the music. I'm not a great fan of Joshua Bell.

roman

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I too loved "The Red Violin". I definitely recommend it if you don't mind subtitles. I have wondered about where my violin has been in the past 100 years and who has played it and how it ended up in America. I really liked seeing the red violin make it's way around the world through history, especially the part in China. I thought Joshua Bell was great by the way, but that's just my opinion. smile.gif

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quote:

Originally posted by fatcat:

If you speak French or don't mind subtitles, "Un coeur en hiver" (1992, I think)was wonderful. Ravel music featured throughout with mamy scenes of violin-making and violin-faking. Below is a review from Leondard Maltin:

[[Fascinating study of what happens when two longtime business partners in the classical music world find their ``friendship'' split apart by the appearance of a beautiful young woman. All three stars shine in this talky, offbeat tale of love and music (specifically Ravel). An original film, admittedly not for all tastes.]]


Yes, "Un coeur en hiver" is a beautiful movie, and Emmanuelle Beart was very convincing in the violinistic motions (the actual player was Jean-Jacques Kantorow). If I remember correctly, Erato released the soundtrack on CD. Another good French movie dealing not with violin but its ancestor the viol, is "Tous les matins du monde". It's based on a similarly titled short novel (don't recall the author's name), and is about the lives of the great 17th-century French viol players/composers Sainte-Colombe and his pupil Marin Marais. Gerard Depardieu had the Marais role, and the actual player (and musical director) was Jordi Savall. It's an excellent movie, and beside the gorgeous music, it captures the spirit of the 17th-century France very well.

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On the Red Violin topic - OK, it was good in places, but its unusual format did not work for me - and some of the characters seemed shallow. The part I really found hard to swallow was the section with the English virtuoso, and his antics with the violin. Highly uncomfortable! And bad for the bowing arm.

Also, in the theater I saw it in, the violin sound they used to represent that instument was quite strange - with a sort of clicking sound overlaid. Did anyone else find this?

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I thought the red violin was very good (especially the part with the Chinese revolution). The English virtuoso really accented the "vir" (latin for man) in "vir"tuoso. Very odd sex scene. Otherwise I thought the movie was very good. Obviously don't go see it if you're looking for great acting (it wasn't bad but...), however the directors did a great job. The concept is fantastic. Oh yeah... the characters have no depth because if the directors gave them depth the movie would have been 6 hours long.

Hilary and Jackie is good

Let them have Music is good

I haven't seen many others.

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I'd like to put in another favorable review for 'The Red Violin'. I liked the plot format- I give it major kudos for originality. Okay, the Oxford scene... I thought it was hilarious and I think that's what it was supposed to be- Girard wanted us to see how rediculous it was. Believe me, you won't catch me doing that any time soon, but how true, the dumb things we will sometimes do for the love of the instrument... I loved it becasue it reminded me of my own obsession with the violin during my high school years and because Girard expects you to keep up with the plot. It's a gorgeous movie, and that soundtrack... wow. If you're hell-bent on not seeing the movie then at least get the soundtrack becasue this is one Corigliano piece that's actually accessible tongue.gif hee hee! j/k. It's gorgeous music.

Good stuff! laugh.gif

(Just wanted to add smilies...)

[This message has been edited by MarvyMei (edited 01-10-2000).]

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Another vote here for the "Red Violin," although, admittedly, it's hardly Oscar material. As far as cinematography and lushness of sets goes, this movie shines. The acting leaves a bit to be desired of course, but I don't belieeve any of the actors were very well-known high-profile folk. The fact is the director was working within a tight budget, and rather than spending it on first-rate actors, he opted to spend it on filming. I liked the plot quite a bit.... but I have to say that the part about Alexander Pope in Oxford was irritating.

I understand that this movie may have little appeal to those outside the world of bowed instruments, but in our circles, it's a masterpiece....

"Hillary and Jackie," on the other hand, was a GREAT movie all around.Emily Watson is a brilliant young actor. The film was made under the watchful eye of Hillary and Piers Du Pré (Jacqueline's brother and sister), so the facts are relatively accurate. I highly recommend this film... and if they sell tissues at Blockbuster, buy a few boxes.

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Ludwig: well, actually, Sylvia Chang, the actress who played the amateur violinsist saving LVR from the communists, is very, very big overseas, but hardly known over 'round these parts.

Ugh- did I hear someone mention that infernal annoyance that was 'The Living Daylights'? *retch* More stuff with really bad string instrument acting: 'Vanishing Son'- okay, so I was only watching that because Russel Wong is a real cupcake- hey, I'm a teenager, I can't help it tongue.gif But the Mozart-playing scenes almost completely killed it for me. laugh.gif

Did anyone ever see that 3M bandaid commercial where this young kid is auditioning in a talent contest and he's doing Waxman's Carmen Fantasie or something. Who was that kid? If that was dubbing, I am mightily impressed. If it wasn't... YIKES! shocked.gif

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Yet another supporter of The Red Violin here.

I loved it from the opening scene on, and I have just now taken up the violin, resulting partly from the movie!

Perhaps if you are used to films made to Hollywood templates designed for maximum profit, you will be disappointed, in that you might actually have to think. The "stories within the story" was a brilliant touch, in my opinion.

See the film and buy the soundtrack. You won't be sorry.

(P.S. Ol' Bull, you must be hard to please...didn't I see you pooh-pooh Itzhak Perlman in another topic on this board?)

Swell!

Mike Sheehan

[This message has been edited by MikeSheehan (edited 01-12-2000).]

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The girls and I just watched a movie called "The Girl in the Limberlost" that takes place in 1908. The girl's father was a violinist and she inherited his musical talents, but Mom doesn't like music.

It was a somewhat depressing story, and the kids thought it was very long, but if you want to try it out, there it is. I don't think you can rent it. I borrowed it from a friend who buys a lot of movies from a company called Feature Films for Family Entertainment, so you may have to order it. We also saw "Beethoven Lives Upstairs". That had violinists in it, but not as a focus. It was a really good movie however! The girls loved it.

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Originally posted by MikeSheehan: "(P.S. Ol' Bull, you must be hard to please...didn't I see you pooh-pooh Itzhak

Perlman in another topic on this board?)"

You're right, I have been a bit negative recently - critisizing Perlman, Mutter, and The Red Violin. I trust that if these are dear to your heart I have not put too big a dent! I'll try to think of some positive things to say soon.

You're right, the makers of the Red Violin had the courage to try something different... and as I said, it worked in parts. I just tend to remember the things I did not like (the gypsy scene somehow irritated me - I found that part of the soundtrack pastiched and repetitive; also the "secret" to the movie was a bit obvious -also, the "red violin sound" WAS peculiar, wasn't it?).

Ah well, there's no accounting for taste.

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I consider myself a relatively bright individual and I didn't think the secret of the violin was obvious.... In fact, I didn't figure it out until moments before it was revealed....... But let's not spoil it for those who haven't seen it!

[This message has been edited by Ludwig (edited 01-13-2000).]

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Originally posted by Victor:

Hey, for those of us lucky enough to have Blockbuster memberships, where (in what section) might we find some of these cinematographic masterpieces such as "The Red Violin"? I am now curious to see several of these films...

Victor

I could not find The Red Violin at a Blockbuster or Hollywood or any chain. My wife and I called around until we found a video store that specializes in foreign and classics. "Let your fingers do the walking!" Call around, and enjoy it when you find it.

Mike Sheehan

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I recommend two movies: The Red Violin and Kolya. Well, I recommend The Red Violin for the reasons that are quite obvious. It was very intelligently crafted in terms of the plot and cinematography. I thought it was one of the best movies of the year. wink.gif

Kolya is about the relationship between a child and a man. No, it is not a movie about the violin. It's a movie about a cellist. But it's worth seeing. The actors did a remarkable job, especially the kid. It won an oscar for the best foreign film. smile.gif

Another interesting little film is Paul Newman's Nobody's Fool. It is not a movie about violins. But Jessica Tandy played violin (she started taking lessons just for the movie at the age of 85!) laugh.gif

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