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Are there any GOOD ebay sellers out there?


priya
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"What do you think of jwesel?"

I never ran across "jwesel". When I searched his listings, I found that he sells priamrily through his eBay store. I like auctions, myself, and never check out eBay stores. The listings impress me as those of a retail dealer and not a part timer/hobbiest like most ebay dealers.

I like to deal with folks who share my passion for the product. I consider the profits I make to be a bonus adding to the pleasure I receive from dealing violins but it is not the primary goal. My goal originally was to handle as many violins as necessary until I could get a bit of a clue as to how to identify and value them. I am beginning to wonder how many it takes. I thought it might take 500, but it looks like it will require several thousand. I would really like to keep most of them, but that is a little difficult.

Jesse

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Quote:

Quote

"What do you think of jwesel?"

I never ran across "jwesel". When I searched his listings, I found that he sells priamrily through his eBay store. I like auctions, myself, and never check out eBay stores. The listings impress me as those of a retail dealer and not a part timer/hobbiest like most ebay dealers.


I wonder if jwesel has a retail shop, and if he did, which one? There is an Enrico Marchetti w/certificate. And most of his "Buy It Nows" have "Submit Best Offer". Anyone know of a retail shop near Rockville Maryland with the inventory he has?

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  • 1 month later...

Norma, don't be mad at Herbie. Think about it...there's no reason to ever bid on anything until the last few seconds...ebay is more like a silent auction, really. Just place your best bid in the last 20 seconds, and if PKnorr doesn't want the fiddle , you may get it, and maybe for less than you expect. It doesn't matter if you bid with 8 days left. Someone can outbid you at the very last second. All anyone who bids early ever does is to run the price up. It's really a bad system for sellers, and ebay knows it. But it's good for them because it moves things along.

If ebay really cared about maximizing the seller's return, they'd put in a system whereby the bidding period is extended automatically by a minute or two anytime there's a bid within the last minute or two. That would put an end to sniping. But they don't.

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When I see the price of one of the violins I am selling run up early it sometimes seriously reduces the number of hits and watchers. If I am hoping to get $1000 I like to see the bidding at $200 on the last day. That insures plenty of people will take a look and hopefully decide to bid. If the price runs up too early it discourages lookers and bidders looking for a bargain. That is the same reasoning behind no reserve and a low starting bid. Start an auction at a fair price and nobody will look or bid. Start it at 10% of its low value and everybody can get in on the bidding-and no one wants to "lose" it.

Jesse

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"""When I see the price of one of the violins I am selling run up early, it sometimes seriously reduces the number of hits and watchers."""(hits and watchers.....same thing?)

...They'll hit the listing, to see why the bidding is so high, ( in other words, what's all the fuss about), and may decide it's not worth any more attention, because it's already higher than most will bid at that point.

""""If I am hoping to get $1000 I like to see the bidding at $200 on the last day. """

...Hogwash..you'd be thinking it's a bad time to sell.

"""If the price runs up too early, it discourages lookers and bidders looking for a bargain. """

...a bargain at $1,000.00, or at $200.00 ?? Depends on how "well informed" the bidders are. Maybe the "un-informed" are the ones bidding early..then the "less" un-informed are bidding at the end. Hmmmm?

"""That is the same reasoning behind no reserve and a low starting bid. Start an auction at a fair price and nobody will look or bid. Start it at 10% of its low value and everybody can get in on the bidding-and no one wants to "lose" it."""

...Start the auction off at 99 cents, with good pics, and a good, decent description, and it will eventually sell for what it's worth at "that" particular time of the week. If you "candy-coat" a few things, it will sell for even more.

Sorry pahdah...I'm just "jasha" ya. I know exactly what you mean...and you're exactly right. Anyone who sells violins on eBay, knows what you mean.

Ya know......

You seem to know "how" to auction violins, as well as you you know violins themselves.

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quote...Start the auction off at 99 cents, with good pics, and a good, decent description, and it will eventually sell for what it's worth at "that" particular time of the week. If you "candy-coat" a few things, it will sell for even more.


that seems reasonable.

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"""When I see the price of one of the violins I am selling run up early, it sometimes seriously reduces the number of hits and watchers."""(hits and watchers.....same thing?)


The seller can see the number of people who have chosen to "watch this item" and track it in "my ebay". Those people, I call watchers. If a violin runs up in price near its full worth early, it will likely sell for less and accumulate fewer watchers as well as fewer page hits than if it goes into the last day low. Yes, I always get nervous if a violin I paid $1000 for is at only $400 on the last day, but I have learned that the people seriously willing to spend generally prefer to snipe.

An auction is a very different thing than a store. An auction introduces urgency and demands decision making. It also introduces and requires competition. Auctions are particularly effective when the item auctioned has an undetermined or variable value. Antiques, art, and other items that are unique, have a wide range of value depending on the auction venue or retail environment.

If you were to ask ten dealers attending the Christies auction in NY this past Friday, to put values on an 18th century violin picked at random from the offerings, without giving them the benefit of the description, my guess is that their range of prices(low to high) could well exceed the estimated value of the instrument. Assuming that to be true(and I feel confident it would be), how is a retail buyer, with little time or opportunity for comparison, to make an informed decision, and place an accurate value on an instrument they are buying?

Like I do at a major auction, they rely upon the description provided by the auction house or seller, and the value estimates, if any, that are provided. Most retail buyers of an antique or collectible are looking for a "bargain". Most real auctions operate under the rules of 'caveat emptor' and the high bidder owns the object he purchased and there is no recourse. An auction like Christies provides no condition description in their catalog so the buyer better be careful. EBay is somewhere betweeen an auction and a store. People are looking for the "bargain" but the onus is on the seller to completely and accurately describe the item so as to avoid negative feedback and unhappy customers. It helps to keep the seller honest and he cannot hide behind the anonymity of a auction house like Christies.

I could not sell a violin with hidden damage without an full and accurate description on eBay, but I could consign it to a major auction house who may not disclose the problem, if they are aware of it at all. I know from personal experience as I have bought such problems in the past. (a scuttled fiddle makes a colorful flame in the fireplace, by the way)

Jesse

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Ooooo, don't burn them please! Send them to me and I'll fix 'em and sell 'em myself! BTW, where is that bizzare April fool's one? Is that on the fire too? I hope not as it was very cool!

But I agree with you on the old ebay auction front and would like to add that at the moment, the people out on ebay - definitely at the moment as it seems a bit dead on the UK one - are cherry pickers and dealers looking for a bargain. I seem to have run out of steam on my low end violins and am now looking for something more meaty to get selling but it puts me off buying a more expensive restoration project because I will lose so much money on ebay - you know, time, effort, raw materials - well you all know the score. I have been contemplating setting up a site but then compared with ebay, it will get a small viewing. I know in the UK, if you are an auction house, you can't lose by advertising your instruments on the net, as they seem to be going like hot cakes and as PHound says, with very little description, terrible pictures and no indication of the horrors that lurk beneath. Perhaps we should set up a Maestronet Auction House?!

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That's a good idea Skreechee. Although based on what a lot of us would offer on it, maybe Jeffery and others wouldn't want to be associated with it. Can't blame them--they set a very high standard.

But if they were honest offers for honest violins--no scammers allowed--what the downside? Mnet could offer escrow services for payment, where no one gets any money until the goods are perused, but no money goes back unless the goods do also. And no fixed auction end dates, either. A real auction. Of course, there is a lot of administration to be done, and the real silent killer of good ideas in our litigious society:

L I A B I L I T Y

The esteemed PHound himself has considered setting up a site for honest violinistic commerce, and since he's near A. Sweet, who is a veteran web entrepreneur, I'm surprised that they haven't done this already.

On second thought, this site is sponsored by dealers, and it's likely they would not be very interested in sponsoring such an auction site.

Just thinking out loud. I apologise for stealing everyone's electrons with my rambling.

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