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DougP

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Hi Daryl;

I use the larger knife for the feet, at least initially. The knives are both double bevel. The taper is pretty much straight on, but I'm careful not to let then get "hooked". The smaller knife is relatively flexible near the point, so it's easy for me to manipulate (flex) it should I need to cut a slight "hollow".

The stamp on that bridge is "'B. Zanders- M.-Gladbach".

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Thanks Michael. How do you measure how far the post is behind the bridge? And I can't seem to figure out how the two little notches work. Could you explain it some more?

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Thanks Michael. The plainer worries me. I never used one, I just used sandpaper and a file. Also, I have to put sticky tape on my fingers as the blood from the finger tips tends not to go with maple!

Your bridges are brilliant BTW and I am glad to find out you use Aubert No 7s too!

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I just eyeball the post position from the side. You can also slide the rule in front of the post, and see where the nick on the F comes on the width of the rule, if you want. I'm never measuring post position with the bridge on, because by that time the way the violin sounds is more important than the exact number of mm behind the bridge.

Place the notch over the D string right at the bridge and rock the rule. Then do the same with the A string. The notch is cut to the depth so that there's just the slightest rock before the rule hits a string on either side, and it should be the same for both strings. This is much easier than doing the same thing with a bow.

The plane is the tool to use, and like any other tool you need to practice before it works. If I gave up on every tool that didn't do for me in five minutes what it did for someone who's been using it 25 years, I'd be living in a cardboard box in an alley.

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Hi Michael, I have used a plainer before but not on a bridge as basically I have not thought about using it! But I will now - oh and practice with it first before ruining another bridge.

Thanks!

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Yes - I can see that now. If you have anymore of his around, I sure would like to see them. If not, thanks again for the nice display!

Tim

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Jeffrey,

Okay... well, if you ever happen to be going through the box, please pick them out, scan, and send to me along with the weight of that one and the one in the same column at the very bottom. Guess I'm really be pushing my luck here.

That one is my favorite of the ones shown here. I like the slight rearward grain slant of the one on the bottom of that same column.

Tim

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Hi again,

OK Jeffrey, I won't get it any thinner. I just wanted to see if it made a difference to the projection on a Chinese violin I have varnished.

Here is my bridge LOL! Please don't be cruel! My glueing is as bad as my cutting at the moment! I hope to imrpove with practice.

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Okay, there's SO MUCH info in this thread. It's almost impossible for me to absorb it all since I didn't start reading it from the beginning. Is anyone willing to take all this info along with the pics (with permission of the photo owners) and write an article on the art of bridge fitting? In the article it will use the pics to demonatrate the effect of carving various parts of the bridge, ie. bigger kidney will make the sound more xyz and bigger heart will have an abc kind of sound...

Perhaps we could have Maestronet put the article in the forum. This project would be similar to the violin making project forum folks have participated in the past.

Throughts and ideas?

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Cool thread ... I definitely don't claim to be the best at cutting bridges, but here is one of my recent violin bridges. I cut this one from a Despiau blank and I purposely left the knees a little thick for this particular violin. Critique welcome!

JMSBridge.JPG

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I've never cut a bridge and don't expect to any time soon. This is the old bridge off one of my violins and it's different than any I have seen. I am posting it for comments etc.

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Back to terminology.

If the rounded portion above the foot is the knee (makes sense), perhaps one could call the flourish below it the greave rather than foot-wing. Or greve if you prefer French.

Which leaves us looking for a descriptive name for the inner negative space at the base.

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Wow, what a great thread and lovely pictures. A simple question, though... I like symmetrical bridges, but it looks like most of the bridges are sloping towards the e-string. How do you decide whether to make it more symmetrical or more sloping? Does the customer get to decide? The reason I ask is that I'm having a bridge made and I didn't say anything to the luthier about symmetry or shape. I just said I wanted a higher bridge to have a higher action. The reason I like symmetrical is I don't want to hit the C-bout with my bow while playing on the e-string.

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