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Any guesses


fiddlecollector

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I wonder if it's some sort of graduation punch. There are a couple of things that don't make any sense. One is that the lower piece with the slot just seems to be floating unattached except by the pin in the slot--without the little shelf at the bottom it would just hang there and swing. So obviously this isn't the whole thing--there's something missing that this entire mechanism attaches to. Second, even if it was on something, the movement that it makes, and the lock in the middle of the slot, doesn't make any sense. Could this be one of those many ideas that people have that sounds good, but doesn't actually work?

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Except it seems like it would be easier to make something like you've shown.

I see what appears to be a cam at the pivot point. The metal at the bottom of the rod appeas to be shaped somewhat like the edge of the plate. The locking groove on the shaft going down in combination with what appears to be a tension device on the back side (the pointy thing hanging down) appear as if they are to work together in some way. There also appears to be a floating locking pin just a little above that notch on the piece hanging down.

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I recognize this. It is patented soundpost setter that, for the most part, never really 'took off'. Although it was fast, it was considered too invasive when it hit the market, as it left a hole, the diameter of the soundpost, in the top plate. The Swede who purchased the patent and tried to resurrect it, is the fellow who initially promoted the idea of a direct connection between the soundpost & bridge- probably an attempt to save his ill-fated investment. Ron.

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I actually have one of these- it works something like an aluminum can crusher. The dowel on the hangy-down thing is what 'sets' the post. You have to do the operation quite quickly though, or the underside of the belly will splinter quite bad. Ron.

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The 2nd picture looks like a gluepot designed by someone who smoked too much opium in those days and read alot of Jules Verne.

The first picture looks like maybe something can be inserted in the t-slot and sliced when the handle is pulled,...that could be a blade behind the one bolt straight up from the pin.

It could actually be just some spare parts thrown together from a hurdy gurdy also.

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The first picture is a button-holer, a good (strong) operator could bang out a couple hundred violin buttons in a day. Seth, I think I have a line on one if you like.  Just kidding!

The second set of photos are in reverse order. The bottom photo is in the prep stage. You take a white box violin and place it into the open container on the right. It has a silk filter at the bottom, the neck and scroll actually stick out over the top. Place your varnish in the black container on the left and pull the trigger on the bottom left. The spring loaded cam mechanism slams the cauldron over the violin and instantly coats the instrument, the excess liquids drain through the screen and can be reused for additional coats maintaining the same color for consistency.

Neither look to be original works from the masters, probably production copies from some other country.

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