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A few Great Backs


Guy_Gallo
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Okay, we made the following collage as a "hint" for the A few more good backs thread.

It was intended to help with the question of "school" regarding backs. However, that thread has moved on pretty quickly, and the model for the backs has now been suggested.

So I thought I'd start another, simpler thread. In the three below there is a Stainer, a del Gesu, and a Strad.

Which is which. And why, if you can articulate it.

sgs.jpg

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#1 Strad, outline, primarily the C.

#2 GDG, outline, primarily the C.

#3 Stainer, it's not a Strad nor a del Gesu, other than that I'd have no clue except you said one was a Stainer and I don't believe it was the first two.

I am not sure what words to use to describe the difference in the Cs except the GDG looks flatter, or, for those who will understand this reference, the Strad C looks harder to bend the ribs for without cracking them in the corners.

edit: removed some text, as my guess is just based on outline and C bouts, I don't know enough else to say more.

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Well, I looked at all the photos I could find and the middle one looks to me like GDG. I haven't ever seen a Strad that looks like the last one and the first one looks just like a violin ought to look to me-so I'll guess its a Strad. I've never tried to identify anything before other than a guess but the middle one really looks right for a GDG.

hmmm am I learning-finally?

Jesse

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What editing techinique can you teach us, by which you placed the three photographs together??

Why am I asking? The del Gesu in the middle appears to be longer than the S/P form Stradivari, ca. 1700- 1705. It has been stated that all the known del Gesu fiddles are 355.6mm or under. Is this true, or do we have an abberation here??

Thanks,

John

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I think the first step up from knowing nothing at all is to be able to tell the Strad from the del Gesu and the (not Strad nor del Gesu). I think it fits the definition of "newbie" pretty well.

Regarding the length, the necks of #1 and #2 seem to be the same width at the body, so I'm not sure #2 is obviously bigger just due to the photo distance from the camera or the scale of the photo.

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Quote:

Regarding the length, the necks of #1 and #2 seem to be the same width at the body, so I'm not sure #2 is obviously bigger just due to the photo distance from the camera or the scale of the photo.


Well, lovely as a PhotoShop collage might be, I don't think anyone should hold me to the millimeter in terms of accuracy of scale... That is, I wouldn't suggest using my (or any) 300 pixel high photos as a starting point for building a fiddle...

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I am not sure what words to use to describe the difference in the Cs except the GDG looks flatter, or, for those who will understand this reference, the Strad C looks harder to bend the ribs for without cracking them in the corners.


I like this descripttion of the difference between S and GDG.

I've seen others use say S is like a C and GDG more like an mirrored D -- I think the point being a C curves in ever so slightly more than a D.

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I like this version of the backs thread, as my experience is limited to my own violins. So I have now learned something new about ID'ing Strad and GDG violins based on the C bouts. That said, #3 has what I am used to for shape, reinforcing the Stainer ID since both mine are Stainer modeled. I never really thought about it but the short C's would fit with my tendency to hit the corner with my bow.

---------

Am I right in looking further and seeing that the upper end of the St is flatish to either side of the button while the S and GDG are more circular?

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What editing techinique can you teach us, by which you placed the three photographs together??

Why am I asking? The del Gesu in the middle appears to be longer than the S/P form Stradivari, ca. 1700- 1705. It has been stated that all the known del Gesu fiddles are 355.6mm or under. Is this true, or do we have an abberation here??

Thanks,

John


The idea of this group was to illustrate the difference in outlines. The three instruments are not quite to scale... It's difficult to do (takes quite a bit of time) when editing and placing multiple images in photoshop. I think Falstaff did a plenty good enough job to get the idea across. The del Gesu is smaller.

The Strad shown is listed as circa 1707. The Guarneri, 1731. The Stainer, 1668.

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Am I right in looking further and seeing that the upper end of the St is flatish to either side of the button while the S and GDG are more circular?


That's interesting....

Perhaps there's a kind of typology that can be garnered from this. Let the expertes weigh in on this, please.

But I will, glibly, propose the following.

If you imagine the two curves of the upper bouts curving toward an eventual meeting... do they

1) flatten out in their meeting BEFORE the button (what you are seeing in the Stainer).

2) or do they only finish their gently curving embrace precisely BELOW the button (the S GDG).

3) or do they edge up INTO an imaginary meeting place within the button. For example:

ButtonMeeting.jpg

Notice that the edge above the purfling is thicker as it approaches the button. The purfling may make a neat meeting beneath the button, but the edge does not.

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