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Violin ID.


hghareeb
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I wonder If some one can tell me about the listed violin (Origin Or Maker), It was owned by a player who has been worked in many countries (US,England and Italy) he died in 1940s and the violin acquired by one of his relatives, The violin grafted very well and I also have some other photo in intersted ,, Experts suspect that it might be German any one has an Idea Pls. comments .

Regards

15827.jpg

1949.jpg

1951.jpg

15829.jpg

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"How about a picture of the graft?"

You know, I rarely if ever enter into these "identify this violin" type threads, because I'm not really interested in this type of thing as it doesn't bear directly on making.

Still, I am interested in why you guys ask certain things in your pursuit of a maker.

Why ask about seeing the graft? In a violin that is this obviously modern (is that correct - that this is an obviously modern violin?) a graft would probably just be an attempt at "antiquing", and not a result of modifying an older violin up to modern standards.

Do certain makers routinely fake grafts, and then, is their work (or fakery) somehow obvious to the keen eye as such?

Thanks for bearing with a question who's answer is probably apparent to everyone else.

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ct, to answer the question about why I'd like to see the graft, is that I have seen things like this that appear to have been done at the factory, rather than scribed in later. I took it as a sign of slightly better work. I can assure you that my discrimination is not keen enough to use this evidence as an identification feature.

There were in fact some instruments made in the modern era (In Graslitz, for instance) with slightly short necks, and it occurred to me that someone may have grafted this scroll onto a new neck.

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It would be interesting to know if the presence of a graft can tell one anything other than at a very basic level (it might be an "old" violin). I myself have grafted necks onto 17th- and 18th-century instruments, one Vuillaume, and a considerable number of non-descript 19th/20th-century trade instruments. In the case of the latter, would that tell anybody anything about the instrument which isn't already obvious? Of course, were any of these to appear on ebay, there's no telling what conclusions some enthusiasts might jump to.

For instance, take the grafted head below, of a violin made in the 21st century. How could one tell why it has a graft?

dgs3.jpg

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"It would be interesting to know if the presence of a graft can tell one anything other than at a very basic level (it might be an "old" violin). I myself have grafted necks onto 17th- and 18th-century instruments, one Vuillaume, and a considerable number of non-descript 19th/20th-century trade instruments. In the case of the latter, would that tell anybody anything about the instrument which isn't already obvious? Of course, were any of these to appear on ebay, there's no telling what conclusions some enthusiasts might jump to.

For instance, take the grafted head below, of a violin made in the 21st century. How could one tell why it has a graft?"

I have a violin made in the early part of the 20th century with a grafted neck. The maker is known for his fancy-carved heads (literally), and carved them separately from the necks, & from different wood- presumably pear or some such more carvable wood. In this case, the presence of a graft could help to i.d. an instrument as being one of his. Ron.

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Quote:

Would't the fancy head and the type of wood rather than the graft be the identifying feature, the graft being co-incidental in this case?


Yes, the graft itself would be, by far, the lesser identifying feature- but still, an additional indication of his m.o.

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I bought it to set aside for the future It'll appreciate nicely and will eventually be worth while having repaired. I got some quotes for the job, but too pricey. Perhaps I'll be able to do it myself eventually. In the mean time, if anyone would like to do it an extreme budget rate, I'll quite happily accept your generosity

Jacob,

I didn't mean to direct the post at you. It was just a relevant illustration and I happened to hit 'reply' to your post. It seems people sometimes forget that there are other reasons for grafts than neck extension.

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jacob, copyists occasionally make new violins with a grafted head. For the many circa 1900 English amateur makers whos only reference was Heron-Allens book , their excuse would be they were only following his directions. He explains in his book how its the normal thing to do when following a specific model.(Hence the chapter on how to do a neck graft)

I think in most cases now, its probably a mixture of the need for a repair due to a broken neck ,like Japes points out , copying old violins and a fair amount of deception.

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