Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Fagnolas have kind of small tone & lack of depth?


wdman

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 92
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

It doesn't look good with the top plate and a lot of dirt or wear physically. I believe that was a genuine Fagnola, it did't show as if it is in good condition, it just doesn't have any clue to arrive a hefty 45000US, it must have something.... From a several years back probably in 2001, two fagnolas were bidding in one tarisio and the one made in 1922 went unsold look very mint, has anybody tried that one.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Things that may look horrible to a player often won't bother a restorer. I bought a violin a couple of years ago that had a top which was completely black with dirt and grease, from sitting on a shelf for a century or so. Underneath was a spotless, nearly new violin. Likewise with cracks--here today, disappeared tomorrow. That's just the type of thing a perceptive dealer will buy, clean up and set everything right, and then make a lot of money on, because players were scared away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps.

But normally if an auction piece is underway on the auction list and it said to have repaired done previously to the violin (ie a repaired soundpost crack) "I could be wrong here." People couldn't dig their way into the soundbox and examine the repair work, don't they? However many would think that it has "The crack" and place their money else where, so where exactly is the line differentiate good and bad repairs?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you guys buying an instruments from any auction house, before you make the decision, I suppose you know from the surface whether the violin has had any repairs done, but that's only the surface; I mean, could you spot any repair work done within, I am sure you don't bring also tiny gadget into the auction room and take a good look inside, do you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A word of advice , be careful of buying anything that looks in too good a condition .Its either a crap violin or a fake. With something like Fagnola or whatever your interested in i`d expect to see a decent amount of wear to the contact points ,etc..

I haven`t seen an invisable repair yet ,that i can`t spot although on some of the top price violins the repairs are very hard to discern.

I always look inside the best i can if i go to auctions in person and carry a small maglite and a dental mirror.

Make sure you know how to hold a violin properly as well otherwise you`ll be frowned upon in certain places.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All,

The thread is quite long now.

What are you guys talking about? (Excuse my confusion please) (A good violin or a violin not derserving high price?). Has anyone played that violin in question? or

Is it in aution? Why pick out this one? etc.

Thank you for your help if you can give me some clues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Look guys, this is a forum. I have questions, typed and seek for references. No doubt I have interests towards Fagnolas from the start, then it raises issues like choosing the "Right" fiddle during the purchase via auctions etc, that doesn't mean that I am sticking with Fagnolas.........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This has been a long thread devoted to a particular maker. I have heard of him, of course, but not seen any representations. Let alone enough to generalize about them.

Michael, if this evaluation is correct that should be an interesting database for making some generalizations. If there is a similarity one to the next, can you say anything about what causes the similarity? Or is the initial premise flawed ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you mean is there a tonal similarity among Fagnolas? If so, I'd say yes, the same as there's a tonal among all my violins, and probably among all of John Masters'.

Where that comes from, however, isn't clear to me. It's a minor rule among guitar makers, where things are simpler, that you can make another maker's model, but you'll never make his guitars. I just did something I really never do, that I know you've done, too--completely rebuilt four old relatively inexpensive violins, two German, one American, one French, all from around 1900. The models were very different: big, small, wide, narrow, high, low, flat arch, puffy arch. My shop partner commented when I was done that they all sounded a lot like my violins in some respects, so I guess I must have put something of myself in them.

However, that said, I'd never suggest that someone who likes one of my violins would automatically like another one, because they're all individuals, and all different.

I don't know if that relates to your question??????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I would say that was very helpful. Perhaps on your rebuilds, you have done what I do. That is, take a little wood out of an overly thick top to get a particular tap tone and then put in my own bar which I do in a particular way.

As to Fagnola, I suppose it is possible that he had a large stock of uniform wood also.

But I must add, I usually make violins in triplets and the only thing that always seems to dominate tone is differences in woods. Of course, a basic tap tone (ring mode) can compensate somewhat for density. This probably gives no more data than basic flexing. Just my feelings of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(1) Are you a player? Or a collector? (both ?)

(2) Are you considering buying the Fagnolas violin ?

It seemed you are not sure what you are doing and want confirmation from the experts here. My question to you is for yourself (to play) or for others (to sell)? The comments or answers should be different in each situation.

Say,for myself I would play it for an hour or two and decide if I want (if I like it) to buy it for what price.

For others as an investment, then go by name (who care its sound). High price high risk. My common sense approach.

My guess you have already bought the violin. Right?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Who side are YOU on? Forget that or sorry I'll say.

Should anyone care about even if I really buy one from this redish maker Fagnola, I wish I had the dough

Try to speak like others pal if you really like to give

valuable comment..........

Besides you really give me pointers at all things, have YOU

shown me the way to the other side of the tunnel, others do. I just about to learn something here and you thrash my thought away, how sad.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My friend,

let me tell you a story:

Once upon a time, a violin lover bought a violin for $4000.

He was happy and played the violin every day until he learnt something from internet that of a good violin its maple wood should come from same tree, not from different trees. After learning that he felt sad. Knowledge is not always help. (each of my violins wood is from one tree, I checked that, but I am not sure the wood are upside down?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi John Master, as you were talking about the tap tone,

would that be the actual response from tapping the wood and see how much it rings back on you or else?

Secondly, a question for you and Michael, as I recall from seeing the Strad or Guarneri, I notice that their flames from the back are sometimes slating from one to the other, should that contribute to any sound difference even if

they all having made from the same piece of wood?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...