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Michael Darnton

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Wow, you didn't make your ribs stick out at all above the block and then trim it down. Looks like you made your ribs exactly how tall they needed to be.

Inspirati: you'll be surprised how flexible the rib garland is, and you can pull the sides out away from the mould and it will give you enough slack to slide the ribs off the mould despite the linings.

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Michael,

If you're not worn out by the questions, I've been inletting my C bout linings using a miter rather than square mortice. My reasoning is that I get a smooth transition at the block when the linings are tapered. Is there a strength, stability issue or do you use square inletting because it was Mr. Strad's solution?

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Quote:

Inspirati: you'll be surprised how flexible the rib garland is, and you can pull the sides out away from the mould and it will give you enough slack to slide the ribs off the mould despite the linings.


Exactly! Because the rib is flexible, it must be kept in the mould while gluing to the back. Else, how can you ensure the precision of the ribs shape after it is taken out of the mould? Once the rib is glued to the back, the flexibility is lost.

Well... let's see how Michael doe it...

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Quote:

Quote:

Inspirati: you'll be surprised how flexible the rib garland is, and you can pull the sides out away from the mould and it will give you enough slack to slide the ribs off the mould despite the linings.


Exactly! Because the rib is flexible, it must be kept in the mould while gluing to the back. Else, how can you ensure the precision of the ribs shape after it is taken out of the mould? Once the rib is glued to the back, the flexibility is lost.

Well... let's see how Michael doe it...


Actually you take the ribs off the mould before gluing to the back. As long as you take your tracing for the back from the ribs while still on the mould you'll be all set. There are different ways you can help ensure that your ribs go onto your back accurately when you're gluing. Michael just does it and he's good enough to get it all straight and true. What I did on my first violin and will do on the second is to clamp my ribs to the back dry, and do all my adjustments of rib position against the back with no glue, and then go around two or three clamps at a time and put some glue into the joint using a painters little spatula thingy. There's other ways.

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I have not made any viola. After reading this thread, I'm tempted to start making one. Michael, would it work if I make an enlarged violin of uniform magnification factor of 16/14. 15.5 arch height in violin would correspond to 17.7mm in viola, and 30 and 32mm in rib would become 34.3 and 36.6mm.

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Hello Michael

Fantastic web page you have there Michael. The info and pictures you’ve posted are a great help to many of us just starting out. I will be cutting wood shortly for a violin. Seth Leigh, was kind enough to send me a copy of a Strad pattern that he uses, and I am making the pattern now. This forum is a tremendous help to nubees like me. Now my big question for Michael. When are you going to write a book !!! There are many of us waiting for that autographed copy :-)

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I love your website and your pictures. It's so informative for players like me who don't necessarily get to spend so much time thinking about all of the work that went into making our instrument before it made it into our hands!

I agree with starman--I'd love to see you write a book

great job and good luck with this viola--I can't wait to see how it turns out!

Saggio

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I really hope that your web pixes will provide the young and forming musician a window of comprehention involved in a selected wood & hand made instrumet. The value of the work and dedication. Tha calibration of the plates , varnishing etc. etc.

They take the prices of our instruments as extravagant and overpaid when compared with the China produced instruments.

An unfair comparison..!Do you agree? :-)

Cordially

Vic

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