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We have had a number of new members this last month and I thought it might be fun for us to introduce ourselves again (like we did last summer). I'll start.

My name is Adam. I'm a fiddle player primarily, although I do play some classical music mostly on viola (I own an 18" Cartwright and play it with a Coda Conservatory bow). I play mostly Celtic, Bluegrass and Klezmer music, and dabble in World Beat, Jazz and Folk. I also play some guitar, mandolin, bouzouki, mandola and cello. I co-own a company called Pioneer Valley Luthier Supply, primarily a bow-hair company. On any given Friday night you'll find me at the Seisun in N. Amherst, MA from 9pm until 2am. I love it here on Maestronet, and am a sponsor as well!

Who's next?

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Hi.

My name is Steve, the violin is a hobby. I played for 7 years through Jr. High and High School and about four months ago went from "I oughta" to "I'm gonna" and picked my violin back up. I have recently taken my first lesson in 24 years.

I work as a commercial property manager, running an new office building in Burbank, CA. I can not yet be found playing in public, though I am thinking of seeking out an amateur group of some sort in the next couple of months.

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hallo! i am a new member! thank you for the welcome. so let me introduce myself.

my name is enrico (the nickname corien is an anagram of my name). i am 40 yo. i live in rome, italy. i am a research physicist (in the field of quantum optics). playing violin is my main hobby. i'm still studying it and taking examinations at the local ABRSM school of music (up to now i got grade 6 with distinction). as i wrote in my homepage, i define myself an "adult violin student". i also play it in two local amateur orchestras.

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Hi folks,

My name is Jay Damm and I own and operate a violin shop, Woodland Strings, in Lemont, Illinois (30 min. SW of Chicago). I specialize in repairs and set ups, and also deal in beginner to advanced level instruments (Scott Cao, William Harris Lee, John Norwood Lee, Eastman, ect.). In my "spare" time I'm currently working on building a violin and finishing up my F-5 mandolin. I also play violin, guitar, and electric bass, plus a little fishing and mushroom hunting here and there never hurts...

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Regis Galbach here and I'm new to this forum. Started collecting and restoring bows and then begun to play violin again after nearly 40 year break. Not yet ready for prime time! I'm a commercial realtor, sing bass in large church choir and design/make jewelry to show in gallery. My jewelry tools/skills sure come in handy for bow work. God, family, music, other art, and then forced to pull weeds in my lawn.

I'm thankful for this helpful forum.

Regis

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Ciao Corien (Enrico)! Nice to meet you and welcome to the forum. I'm assuming you're the same Corien at the Asylum? Have you checked out the Fiddle Forum yet? Welcome to Maestronet. As you've probably seen already, this is a great place to be. Lots to learn, nice people, nothing to lose!

Say, my sister in-law grew up in Florence. She told me of a violin maker friend of hers there named Jamie. I can't remember her last name, though. Have you heard of her? Has a shop in Florence. I think she was born in the US, but trained in Cremona and stayed there.

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Hi, I'm Marc. I'm from Fairhope AL, about 40 miles from Mobile. I've been here before, but it's been a while; it's going to take me a while to get back in the swing of things here. I'm 32, a die-hard amateur violinist. I've done some teaching too, which helped me get over some really bad stage fright. That and being a complete beginner on the 'cello. Now I've got a wild hare to make a violin,so I'm doubly glad this site is here. It's been a big help to me, and I just hope I can be as helpful.

See ya 'round---MJR

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Quote:

Ciao Corien (Enrico)! Nice to meet you and welcome to the forum. I'm assuming you're the same Corien at the Asylum? Have you checked out the Fiddle Forum yet? Welcome to Maestronet. As you've probably seen already, this is a great place to be. Lots to learn, nice people, nothing to lose!

Say, my sister in-law grew up in Florence. She told me of a violin maker friend of hers there named Jamie. I can't remember her last name, though. Have you heard of her? Has a shop in Florence. I think she was born in the US, but trained in Cremona and stayed there.


hi Arsweet! nice to meet you. yes, i'm the same corien at the string asylum. thanks for the welcome. what is the fiddle forum? and yes, i'm enjoying the useful information and suggestions i can find here in Maestronet.

i'm sorry i do not know violin makers in florence. florence it's not far from here but i know only local luthiers in rome.

see you soon!

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Hi Steve! ... What genre of music do you play now?


Hi Adam, I guess general student classical - I am currently working up Toselli's Serenade (arr. CPH)and the Adagio movement of the Sonata #1 in B Minor by J.S. Bach (BWV 1014) for my next monthly lesson.

Beyond that I am browsing the music store for things that look interesting and within my range.

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I have joined in the past month too, though I've lurked here for over 3 years so I feel like I know you all really well! I'm a college student and have played viola for the past 9 years and violin for the past 4. I've enjoyed playing in various community youth orchestras, and currently play in the Grand Rapids Youth Symphony. I also play piano and manage a string quartet. And in the past two years I've had the chance to broaden my style and play with an acoustic band. All the songs we do are in guitar chord notation so my ad-lib skills have grown impressively. I'd like to get into celtic music but the different modes and loose rythmns are very intimidating and unusual to me. Thanks for the warm welcome!AshNaj (A nickname from a friend, comes from "Lord of the Rings")

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Hi Steven, I'm much like you in having played violin for 12 years from first grade to 12th grade. Then I lost interest during college, got too busy, job, kids and work intervened. Last summer at church, one of the members brought in her violin and since I opened my big mouth about how I used to play, I found myself putting a violin to my chin for the first time in 25 years. Can't say I played very well, they were all much too polite. But from then on I determined to pick it up again, instead of the "when I retire..." excuse I used in the past.

I work as a manager for software development for a computer networking company. I'm taking lessons and working on the Bach Violin Concerto #1 in A minor.

Thanks for the great advice that is found on this board.

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I'm also new...though post occasionally on Sheila Helser's Board.

I don't play the violin, only the flute, and that not well (embarrassed silence...).

Having a violin-playing son has got me listening to a lot more string music. I don't know why he is so keen on the sound of stringed instruments, maybe my poor flute-playing put him off the whole wind family!

I'm a laid-back Kiwi living in crank-up-the-stress-some-more Japan.

Reading the revived Korean whizz-kid thread has been interesting. I guess you just can't have it all...in the end, the kids whose parents are driving them will only stick with violin if they have their own reasons to care about it; and the kids who want to follow their own instincts will eventually knuckle down to practice if they care enough about how their own playing sounds.

I couldn't force my son to practice for 3-4 hours a day like some other 10 year olds, but at the same time, living in Japan makes me realize that our western way of isolating kids in what we think of as a period of carefree innocence is not necessarily what kids want - part of that drive to grow up includes acquiring adult skills, and when they do it, they are as proud of their musical skills as they are of their ability to cook their own breakfast.

Reading the posts gives me some perspective beyond the Japanese take on musical education -- something I desperately need at times!

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Hi Saggio3of4! I am so glas you are playing Celtic music! I understand how you feel about the rhythms. My only advice to you is to go to a few contra dances and dance. The best way to internalize the rhythmic patters is to move your body to them. THat way, when you go back to the music, you FEEL the rhythms inside, and therefore can play them outside. Do you understand what I mean? As far as the modes are concerned, remember that most of this music was taught by ear, passed down from generation to generation by ear - no sheet music! It is better not to think of them as modes, but as MOODS, expressions of a mood. Playing Celtic music is a lot like I imagine painting would feel like - expressive, emotional, creative...

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Hi LastChair! Welcome to Maestronet! I personally am glad you returned to the music after all these years. There is nothing greater to share with one another than music. I think, with persistence and pleasure, you will find much more than skill is necessary. Your enthusiasm, for example, is the driving force behind most community music programs, especially unpaid ones. I have played for years with the Keene Chamber Orchestra in NH. 99% of the members are rank amateurs, with pros hired in for concerts. These amateurs are what keeps the orchestra alive. Attending rehearsals, enthusiastically participating in all efforts that support the orchestra...so dont sell yourself short!

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Hi arsweet, thanks for the encouragement. I'm looking forward to community orchestras once my youngest is older. When I was a teenager I was in the Cal State Dominguez Hills Chamber Orchestra where the majority of us were NOT students at the college. I noticed that for concerts some better players in the first violins and cellos would join a few weeks before, and then disappear. So I suppose that is how it works. My dad faithfully drove me to all the rehearsals.

In answer to all_ears, I'm glad that our western ways allow children time for hobbies. Otherwise all the teenagers would be in math and computer science classes, driven by their parents to excel in areas where they can be competitive. I had a conversation with another manager at my company who was worried that she let her daughter take Music instead of Computer science for her elective, but at the end, decided that children need time to grow, to smell the flowers, and to develop in areas other than work-related.

My son is 3 years old and says he wants a little violin. Since I was taught by traditional method and my current teacher is of the Russian school, I'm looking for any advice about whether I should try to teach him myself, or to find a teacher. I'm not sure my son has the attention span to really pay attention to instruction. Also, my husband is against the violin-playing saying he'll sound horrible and wants him to play the piano when he turns 4 or 5, so I'm not sure there will be enough support for Suzuki method as that involves a lot of parental support. Maybe I should just try and teach him myself and then bring it up with my teacher if my son shows some maturity? Any comments or ideas?

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Welcome all!

I found Maestronet about two years ago, and I mostly just lurk, culling for advice, but not actually commenting.

I'm a professional writer/copyeditor for a weekly alternative newspaper here in Anchorage. I started playing the violin after my grandfather passed on and left me his axe. I'm 27 years old and am making small progress in cheap listen-and-play books, and I'll eventually start lessons to reach my ultimate goal of playing old-time bluegrass fiddle with my buddies.

Cheers to all!

Scott Woodham

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Hi lastchair,

I wouldn't try to teach the little guy yourself. We made some attempts along those lines with our kids garnering indifferent results. It's so much nicer to say - Gosh, Ms X really wants you to practise this - than to say - I really wish you would practise this. I don't think there is any way around dedicating a great deal of time helping young children with music lessons. Even if they are not Suzuki students, preschoolers can't really practise by themselves. My 7 year old still likes me to be in the room while he practises (45 minutes or so a day).

Tell your husband that your son will sound terrible. He fell a lot when he learned to walk too. On the other hand, keyboard instruction is a nice way to be introduced to music.

Have Fun!

Hannah

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I am a beginner ( just a few months) at the hobby of playing the violin. I am an engineer and live in Atlanta. I have been learning to read and play the piano for a year now, so I come to the violin with a little reading experience. And I am glad to join this forum. It;s fun, inspirational and educational.

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I'd been reading on the forum for a few years, and started to post a few months ago. Have asked some questions and gotten helpful info. I studied fiddle as a kid (Juilliard Prep) but stopped in HS. Went on to several different academic pursuits, ended up a psychologist. Didn't play for almost 40 years, and started again a few years ago. I could't be made to practice as a kid, now I deeply regret that somebody didn't force me. My sister is a professional classical pianist, so it's always been in the family blood. I love to play now, and am less mortified about how I actually sound than I once was. This forum provides me a precious link to violin lovers - I would have no other opportunity to feel connected without it, and I am grateful that resourceful people set this up. Thanks to all.

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Welcome, Violinski! I'm glad you are here. I agree, this forum is a very friendly place and there is a lot to learn. An excellent place to start is to search the archives. Post a keyword such as "bow", or "shoulder rest" and you'll be amazed what fantastic discussions pop up! Maestronet's a great place to be, if you have the time.

I agree, 3 cheers to the folks that set this up, and to the moderators who keep it clean!

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hi.. I´m not a new member, but I´ve been away for a while. There are many new names on this board and some that I remember.

I´m not as my nickname may suggest a fiddler, I´m more a classic player and sometimes a rock-player (I play the electric violin in a band).

I´m 29 and played the violin for about 20 years but I´m a really bad player for I was allways lazy when I should have been practicing.. anyway with some effects and a big amp I haven´t heard anyone say anything bad about my play... (if the amp is turned on there just IS nothing else that I can hear).

What else about me? Ah, yes.. sometimes my posts are funny to read for my english is not perfect. I live in germany and work as an AD with an advertising agency.

My nickname is the title of a poem by William Butler Yeats, for I love english poetry.

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