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how hard is the Ravel Tzigane?


vi01in
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Okay, I'm now obsessed with this piece. I am, of course, dying to play it.

I want to know if it would be even reasonable to ask my teacher if I can play it.

I'm working on Wieniawski d minor, Lalo SE, Bach d minor partita. And Fiorillo and Kreutzer etudes.

Where is Tzigane in relation to, say, Tchaik? And if it's too hard, what's an idea of a piece in the same stylistic idea that I could manage?

Thanks!

Lavender

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I think Tzigane is about on the same level as the Tchaik. I would expect you'd be playing the next level up with respect to etudes: Paganini and Gavines. I'm not your teacher, of course, but I don't think there's anything wrong with looking at it, though. You can certainly play parts of it, isolate and work on the harder, virtuosic bits, using them like etudes, and listen to a lot of recordings.

Have you played Devil's Trill? I think that comes before Tzigane but if you're playing Lalo you should be okay. If the piece turns you on, you should just enjoy it. I don't think I'd ever say to a student, no, you can't work on that, if they were excited about a work.

Other pieces you might also look at: Bartok Rumanian Dances, Beethoven Romances, Chausson's Poème, Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro.

EM

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Thanks!

Actually, I'm kinda looking for a sort of 'step up' piece from where I am now, one that I really like that would really pull me up technically by working on it, as you said, like an etude. I considered Tchaik, then Tzigane, but I kind of like the flavoring of the Tzigane better. It seems like a real 'let it rip' piece, if you see my meaning, where as Lalo has to be so tempered. I like Bruch because of the intensity, and I wanted another one like that.

BTW, I saw where you're from- do you know Annie Chalex?

Okay, well thanks!

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Assuming you play those pieces you're working on well, I think Tzigane would be an appropriate stretch. Its difficulty will depend on how good your harmonics, left-hand pizzicato, octaves, and gypsy-inspired ideas are!

In some ways, I think that Zigeunerweisen is harder - in a way it requires more technical purity, like Saint-Saens Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso. Lots of people (myself included) played Zigeunerweisen first, and depending on the strong points of your technique, it could be easier... It's certainly in the same stylistic genre as Tzigane.

Quite a bit easier, but in the same genre, would be Monti Csardas. If you need something gypsyish in a hurry, the Csardas would be fun if you haven't played it before.

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My daughter is working on Tzigane right now and has blisters on her fingertips. The left-hand pizz is challenging, even for someone who's had a good bit of experience with it.

In addition to the other good suggestions (yeah, Kreisler's Praeludium & Allegro!), you might look at de Beriot's Scene de Ballet. It is a great technical workout & sounds nice, too.

J.

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umm, i think left hand pizz will be the least of your worries with tzigane. That piece is quite difficult, it requires a level of of mastery beyond that of the pieces mentioned i think. I personally would wait a while before tackling that piece, i think you wouldnt even want to have to worry about technique, the musicality will be difficult enough. FOr left hand pizz workouts try paganini 24.

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Yeah...everyone's basically said what I was going to say, but I'll just mention some stuff anyway.

As my mom already mentioned, I have recieved some burly blisters from this piece on both hands. It's not a terrible burden to me, but I also just got done with the Tchaik (as well as years of practice with Gav/Dont etudes).

Anyway, just telling by your level (I don't want to sound condesending or anything, I mean, I haven't even heard you play) I'd advise against it. If you like it that much then you can wait. It'll be better that way! I would replace the idea with either Caprice Basque by Sarasate or a Weinowski Pollonaise.

Happy playing!

--Mazas

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  • 17 years later...

I have a question. Should I play Ravel Tzigane, when I already played whole Sibelius concerto, Bloch Nigun, Mendelssohn, sarasate introduction and tarrantelle (at 12 y.o.) and Hubay Carmen? I will play it anyway, because my teacher wants it, but I'm just wondering, if I have that technical level ://

Jilji, 15 y.o.

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The best person to discuss this with - really is your teacher.

You can provide us with a list of music that you play but we can't tell how well you play them, or what technical issues you may have, etc., so we can't offer good advice.

 

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