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tendonitis in the shoulder


gleam
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This is a very common problem. Normal school medicine rarely detects the cause and is useless in treatment. They give you cortisone based drugs and tell you to rest. Thank's for the poison and useless recommendation!

It is very important to get a good diagnosis of any mechanical problem. First is an x-ray. But it won't say anything about the state of the tendons or rotator cuff. This is where an MRI is very important. Something is causing the inflammation. To just treat it won't help in the long run. Once that's attended to, yes, you must treat the inflammation. DMSO is the best treatment available. But it's not approved for humans. That doesn't mean it's not safe. It's simply not profitable for pharma companies. Go to a vet store specializing in horses. Apply it to the area a couple times a day. Let it sink in instead of rubbing it in. You'll smell, as it's sulfur based. But it's worth it. And Ibuprofen can be used for acute pain until you've got it under control. While you're at the vet store, pick up a bottle of linament for race horses. Rub it in. It will circulate blood to the area and works very well.

Also, look into a magnet therapy shoulder belt.

Stay away from cortisone injections and salves and drugs, such as Maglufen (Voltarin). They'll mask the problem shortly but have no therapeutic value.

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Stretch and Do pushups. I'm no doctor, but strengthening the muscles should take stress off of the tendons. If Pushups hurt, please disregard my post. Exercise will be more beneficial than drugs in the long run. If it is the rotator cuff, it will be difficult to find a combination of exercises to target that area. Perhaps you should see a reputable sports medicine specialist in your area. If, that is, you can find one.

Good luck in your recovery.

Sincerely,

Scott

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I'm extremely suspicious and afraid of tradiitonal medical practice if this practice is limited to medicate or operate. Yoga, meditation, visualization, and Pilates (for example) are becoming more and more mainstream for dealing with problems of this sort. Diet is also important, of course. I would investigate these things before taking any drugs or doing any surgery recommended by traditional physicians.

To begin with, you might want to look at:

_Complete Guide to Pilates, Yoga, and Meditation_ available on Amazon.com

Connie

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Always, always, always check your form and positioning before looking at any further treatment. More often than not, an improperly fitted rest combination is the problem. I have an 11 year old student who refused to use a shoulder rest (DO NOT START THE ARGUMENT, PLEASE) and developed bad form resulting in pain. I sent her to a luthier to get fitted properly, now she has no pain.

I strongly recommend that you find an activity that uses the rest of your muscles. I find that archery is great because it strengthens the back and arm muscles (hand and fingers, too, if you shoot a recurve with fingers). The body position used is similar to that of violin and actually reinforces posture. I suggest finding an archery shop near you and trying it. You may find that, by strengthening the other muscles (as well as your concentration) the pain will decrease.

Of course, make sure your violin form and rest combination is right first. If not, nothing you do will make any difference at all.

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Tendonitis is not uncommon among violinists although elbow tendonitis is probably the most common variety. You should get a referral from your doctor to a physical therapist, preferably one who treats musician. That person will be able to give you appropriate exercises to strengthen the muscles so that there is less pressure on your tendons. You may also need to take anti-inflammatories. Good luck!

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It seems to me that before you do anything (or do nothing), you ought to get an informed diagnosis.

Next, you ought to follow the advice of a trained specialist--not a bunch of self-proclaimed experts on an internet music forum who have not seen you, examined you, taken your history, tested your range of motion, and so on.

J.

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Quote:

Next, you ought to follow the advice of a trained specialist--not a bunch of self-proclaimed experts on an internet music forum who have not seen you, examined you, taken your history, tested your range of motion, and so on.

J.


I'm not asking for people to diagnose me, I'm just curious if anyone else has had this problem and what they did. Thanks to everyone who has replied so far! some great advice!

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Yeah, I've had tendonitus before. Sucks the big one, but it wasn't too serious. I'm assuming that this is occuring with the right shoulder blade, and you probably got it because you hike your shoulder up to your ear when you try to hit the lower strings. If it's with the left arm, then you're just pressing down too hard with your jaw (do you use a shoulder pad?).

My best advice would be to see a physical therapist, use that hot-cold stuff, take some aspirin, don't raise your right elbow too much, and suck it up. I mean, this stuff happens to the best of us, and it's usually just from poor technique. Talk to your teacher about it, and you'll get the best answers (hopefully).

--Mazas

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Quote:

If it's with the left arm, then you're just pressing down too hard with your jaw (do you use a shoulder pad?).


yeah it acctually is my left shoulder and I do use a shoulder rest that is very comfortable, so maybe I'm just putting too much pressure on my shoulder or something? I don't know if it would do anything but I'm considering getting a chin rest that is higher up, just trying to think of more ideas. hmm not sure. thanks!

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