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What to play after Mozart 5th?


Insane_Violinist
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Depending how well you play the Mozart no.5 (it is not an easy concerto to play well). But have you tried the Spohr No.8, Viotti No.22, or Mendelssohn D minor (not the famous one)? Or perhaps one of the more demanding de Beriot concerto? If you want something more Romantic, how about the Conus or one of the "other" Lalo concerti (he wrote 3 other concerti besides "Symphonie Espagnole")?

I think the Prokofiev No.1 would be a rather major jump. The Barber would be a better choice of the two.

T.

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what about Mozart 4th? (i know i'll get in trouble for this, but...) Beethoven Concerto or his 2 romances? maybe Saint-Saens' Intro & Rondo Capriccioso or Havanaise? also, consider Viotti's 22nd and 23rd. if you are interested in the sonatas, there are of course the Franck and Brahms (at least the G major).

the Prokofiev concerti are both really difficult for someone who just finished Mozart 5th. (when it comes to Prokofiev, there are substantial technical challenges, awkward/eccentric harmonies -- which characterizes Prokofiev's style --, and the "unnatural-ness" that comes to a composition written by a non-violinist.) if you're really bent on Prokofiev, his D major sonata (i think op. 112) for unaccompanied violin might be a better choice; it's much more approachable and quite pleasant.

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Thank you, everyone!

Sorry, as much as I love the Paganini (I've begged my teacher to let me play it, but to no avail...)...

I played Mozart 4th last year, and am currently working on the Introduction and Rondo Cappriccioso. I've played the Beethoven Romances before... I think I will look into the Prokofiev sonata and Barber concerto. Thank you all!

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Fantaisie norvegienne (Norwegian Fantasy) can be counted as a three-movement concerto, albeit a short one. It was Lalo's 3rd violin concerto. The order is as follows: F major (op.20), Symphonie espagnole (op.21), Fantaisie norvegienne (written in 1878), and Concerto russe (op.29).

T.

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Sorry, as much as I love the Paganini (I've begged my teacher to let me play it, but to no avail...)...

I played Mozart 4th last year, and am currently working on the Introduction and Rondo Cappriccioso. I've played the Beethoven Romances before... I think I will look into the Prokofiev sonata and Barber concerto. Thank you all!


Sounds like your teacher is advising you well.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Why don't you give us some other information about what you are doing I_V

I played Mozart 5 at 13 21 and 26+ yrs old! all of which are very different periods in my ability. Tell me about some other sonatas/concerti you have enjoyed and felt able to play and I'll bore you for ages with interesting possibilities.

Seriously, I'd love to help.

T_D

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Quote:

Why has no one suggested the Mozart 6th?


Mozart's 6th, 7th and "Adelaide" concerti are of somewhat dubious origin (quite possibly not authentic). That is probably the reason why they are rather scorned and ignored by violinists. It is acutally a pity, since they are fine (if not quite equal to the 4th and 5th concerti) concerti in their own right.

Technically, the "Adelaide" concerto is the easist of the three. No.6 (in E flat, K. 268) and No.7 (in D, K.271a.) are more difficult. No.6 has some particularly difficult and awkward passages in the outer movements. No.7 is somewhat less demanding than the No.6, although it has very exposed passages in 10th in the middle of the 2nd movement.

T.

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How about getting away from concertos, and into chamber music and etudes? How many of the Kreutzer or Gavines etudes can you play by memory? How about the Bach solo sonatas? (The Kreisler Praeludium and Allegro is a good stepping stone to Bach solo sonatas.) How about the Bartok Rumanian Dances? How about string quartets and piano trios?

The benefits of learning etudes and chamber music with as much care as students devote to concertos are:

-- You actually get to play the pieces as they were meant to be played without having to round up an orchestra of 80 players willing to play with you.

-- In chamber music, you learn to play with others with a degree of precision that isn't there in concerto playing. Chamber music demands rhythmic precision that's a notch greater than what concerto playing demands because in good chamber music, all the players are equal, and any one player has an obligation to keep the rhythm for the sake of the rest. In concerto settings the soloist is, of course, the big cheese, and the orchestra is there to accommodate him/her.

-- Emotionally, in chamber music you learn how not to be the big cheese. You learn to listen intently to your fellow players and follow their lead or needs at times, knowing that at other times, they'll follow your lead and accommodate your needs.

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