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Do you really have to start at age 6 to be the next Perlman?


Zarnath
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I've heard a lot of places that anyone can learn technique, all it requires is discipline. Musicality, that comes from inside. A great violinist is made from a combination of stellar technique and genius musicality.

Assuming all this is true, If one is talented and disciplined, couldn't he pick up violin at like age 10 and learn the technique, and then find that he has the music inside of him, hence becoming the next Perlman. My teacher once told me that "It doesn't matter when you start, but the kind of instruction you recieve".

What do you guys think?

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I agree with HKV. It'll still take you a certain number of hours of practice, even if you are phenomenally talented. Children who start early have a few more years to "fool around" in their practice habits. People who start later need to put in concentrated practice time, which is not always available.

I am inclined to think that parental dedication and support are crucial, too, and late learners often don't have parents who have either quality with regard to music -- parents who thought this kind of instruction was important would probably have introduced it early in their child's life. (Of course, there are financial, geographical, etc. factors involved in that decision.)

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Thanks, Huang!! "Sviatoslav Richter started when he was 17!" (Your line! smile.gif

I've now got four late starters on my list: Tchaikovsky, Richard Stoltzman, Pablo Casals (yeah, Toscha, thanks--12 is a little on the late side), and now Sviatoslav Richter! This is the best yet!!!

Of course, I tell my parents at the elementary school to start their children YESTERDAY if those kids having the burning desire to play.

Respectfully,

Theresa

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I copied and paste this for somewhere.Well,here it is.He was born in Zhitomir in the Ukraine to a family of German ancestry. His father was a respected pianist and piano teacher and his mother an amateur musician who was one of the early admirers of Debussy and Scriabin. He had his first music lessons with his father, becoming a master of the keyboard at the age of 8. The family later moved to Odessa where the young Sviatoslav enrolled at the Odessa Conservatory. In his teens, he was attracted to a career in conducting and at the astoundingly young age of 15 became a conductor for the Odessa Opera and the Ballet Theater, a post he held for four years. He gave his first piano recital at age 19 also in Odessa. Cognizant of his extraordinary talent, his superiors convinced him to study in Moscow with one of Russia's foremost piano teachers, Heinrich Neuhaus. He did so at the age of 22 and soon after completed his studies with the great piano teacher, who later wrote of his star student: "I must say in all honesty that there was nothing more I could teach Richter."

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That's ok, Huang. My list just went back to three, but I'm one ahead of my list of two of yesterday!! smile.gif

Hoshe, thanks for the information. That's one of the strengths of the Fingerboard is our getting our facts and spelling straight!! smile.gif

Regards to both of you,

Theresa

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There would seem to be a natural decline in physical prowess that sets in around age 55-60,as one of our older posters mentioned in a recent post.My future,at age 45/suz.4,will probably see my newly hard won technique that will hopefully bloom in about 5 years,begin to decline a few years later.I aspire now to have something to lose.

Zen and the art of violin playing tells me that the journey is the destination,as usual.

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Jacques Thibaud did not start violin until he was 9, although he had a debut as a pianist a little earlier (with his brother playing the violin. Ironically, this violinist brother, Joseph, became a pianist and a classmate of Alfred Cortot). smile.gif

Boris Belkin had a big "blank" period in his mid-teens when he did not touch violin at all. He claims that he "hated" violin and refused to touch it. Then he came back to violin around he was 17 and practice 7 hours a day to regain his technique.

Pianist Ignacy Jan Paderewski did not "seriously" study with piano till he was about 20. He did play on his own before, but did not apparently systematically study the piano till then. He did not develop the greates fascility (he was no Horowitz, technically), but still managed to survive quite well.

If one has a lot of talent, he/she can still be very good, even starting at relatively late ages. But they have to be very disciplined and willing to practice a lot more than people who started at 5 and consistantly worked on violin.

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I always thought that part of being a virtuoso was either the luck or attraction of finding the instrument that is "Your Voice." Would Paganini have achieved the greatness and ability that he did had he played piano? Both Jaco Pastorius and Scott LaFaro started on different instruments--once they made the moves to the instruments they are "known for" they really blossomed--to the point of being considered "trailblazers" in their particular genres. I'm sorry I don't know of any parallels in the classical world. What do you think? Does the instrument matter?

Mark

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