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Some clips of some Korean early teenager's play


yiugn
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Get Quicktime It downloads the whole file and then plys it continuously.

"These children are very proud. They are taught to be too."

I agree, and I don't like it very much, but that kind of behaviour seems to be taught more and more.

Reminds me to a master course which Sachar Bron (Wieniawsky contest laureat) held in Vienna. The student playing a Paganini capriccio in exactly the manner those young girls do, with this "getting into the string" sound, technically correct, but your ears started to hurt after a few minutes. And then Bron demonstrated. Played a long note high up on the E string, which started from nowhere and grew and grew, faded away and disappeared so incredibly smooth, that it was nearly impossible to tell when it actually ended. No vibrato on this tone at all, but he had no problem to fill the hall Then he started in the middle of a finger breaking passage, with a smooth but "present" sound which seemed to come from far, far away, but filled the hall very well, much better than the student's "near sounding" and apparently louder sound, with accents and changes in tone colour exactly in the right places. It was like entering a different world

Ah, and btw, Bron was mostly _not_ using the whole width of the bow hair.

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I'm sure they're very good, but I had the same problems viewing it as other people.

Much as I respect such excellent players, especially so young, I have to ask, is it true that little Far Eastern children practice furiously for long hours for years and years, often reaching a high standard, then drop it completely during high school? I'm not sure that's the best way to produce well-balanced, useful musicians in the long-run.

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God.

You guys should stand back and listen to yourselves! Methinks the green-eyed monster has reared up it's ugly head.

It's a K-I-D. Remember being one? It's that stage before being an adult when you're not fully formed yet.

It's an incredible performance for a kid to me. And what confidence! Stage presence in spades too.

Would you guys have felt better if the kid stood there knock-kneed and wobbled her way through Twinkle? If it were YOUR kid I bet none of you would have said the ugly, vicious things you did. You guys should be ashamed of yourselves. Surely being gracious and indulgent to the young old is a Good Thing. Or am I being horribly old-fashioned?

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"Bron mostly does flat hair - in my experience (I've listened to his classes for about 2 years)

And by the way - his surename is Zakhar"

I just watched him at this course, so maybe he used jused the edge of the hair to maximise the difference between his and the student's sound, but the result was really thrilling

I know, but I had no idea how to spell the name in english, so I choose kind of a phonetic spelling. Thanks for the correction

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Hey, at least from my side it was not a critiqu at the children, it was a critique at one certain aspect of teaching.

What I am missing - viewing at the _teacher_ is something like:

"now look and listen what beautiful music you are playing"

"Hey, that guy at the piano is your partner, not your servant"

"You play together with your partner wonderful music. Enjoy, celebrate. The audience is just allowed to be there. It's _your_ evening"

I had the benefit of hearing the Borodin Quartet in Moscow. Besides their incredible good performance their way of obviously playing totally for themselves made it to one of the most impressing concerts I ever heard.

Just my $0.02

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Yeah, maybe I did come across a bit bitchy there, no offence meant to the kids, who are obviously fantastic. It's just that there are two Korean women I know (the only two I know, in fact) who are both obssessive about turning their kids into violin prodigies, not because they care about music as such, but because they see having a musically accomplished child as a way of social climbing and kicking other people. They treat their kids like wind-up toys. They're also very racist (in favour of Korea), very pushy, nasty people. That's why I'm a little sore at the moment.

As for these children, who actually ARE talented, sure I'm jealous!

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All forgiven! I wasn't directing my reply to you in particular Sprite, lest my hasty jabbing of the reply button led you to think otherwise.

But, sure, what you said is spot on- it comes at a price. Can't spend all those hours grinding away on the violin and not miss out.

I don't know any Koreans, but don't think I'd like to meet any Korean Jewish Mothers!

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There are a lot of Asian families on Long Island. My son's youth orchestras are half full of Asian kids. Do their parents push them? yes, the ones I know do. But I wouldn't characterize any of them as "nasty, pushy people". Not anymore than there are non Asian nasty, pushy people. I think that is an unfair statement unless the Asian people near you are that way. They aren't here. (No I am not Asian)

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WOw! I say is pretty fast. The only section that I can say could be faster is the very last page, not the beginning, but the very end. I think they do pretty darned well if you ask me. Anyhow, just my dos centavos! In adittion I am willing to bet that behind all this type of playing there are some very pushy and demanding parents. Is my take

Pag

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  • 3 months later...

I felt that this desrves to be brought back to the top.

One qustion I have is, the Waxman variations (which I might rate as the most impressive thing here), is that little girl who plays it, Sarah Chang? (these recordings might have been a good few years ago).

I would like to thank Mark for deleting my old posts on this thread, as I didn't like or agree anymore with everything I wrote, but my own permission to delete them had expired.

There were one or two other things I wanted to say/ask now, but I can't remember what it was.

However, these are very wonderful clips to have free over the internet, I think.

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Sorry, I haven't seen the clips because of my slow connection, but I wanted to comment on prodigy in general:

I think it was Rugiero Ricci who said that all child prodigies are a product of parental ambition -- he should know, as he was one of the most extraordinary child prodigies on the violin ever. It has been demonstrated that child prodigies can basically be produced given even a smidgeon of talent, as for instance with Laszlo Polgar and his wife who intentionally, publicly, and successfully, turned all three daughters into superior chess prodigies (partly because they wanted to demonstrate that prodigies could be produced, just like robots). Prodigy does not connote great talent, much less great genius. I think it is sad to see what these innocent children's parents, teachers, and public do to them. The first step to stopping this sick and twisted freak show is to stop rewarding the parents (economically, but more importantly socially and psychologically) who inflict this meat grinder life on their children.

Don't forget that prodiges, i.e. their parents, teachers, managers, etc. rely on myths and lies in order to raise their market/social value, just as with people working in virtually all capacities of public celebrity (athletes, performers, politicians, etc.).

Children can, of course, play beautiful music, although I have rarely ever heard a 'prodigy' who could (I was so dissapointed when I finally got to listen to recordings of the young Menuhin), so it is sad to see them placed in the freak show category that prodigies' parents depend on.

--Alistair

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95 percent of my students are Asian. Families play a tremendous importance on their development, of that there is no question. I could not do without the parents in this regard and I wish the other parents (americans) learned a few things from them? They are tiny as 6 year olders all the way to 13 playing anything from Suzuki to Wieniawsky. How is this? is the children and parents. Now, most of my parents want them to be professional musicians and so I train them as such.

If they turn out professional or the next Sarah Chang is not my concern. I just teach as I see and give guidance.

I will say that I do not see this type of pushing from most american families. Whatever the reason it scapes me, but is a fact.

Respectfully,

Pag

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