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installation of pirastro oliv strings


oldsubguy
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Just got some oliv's for my violin. (wanted to try a gut string), but am told they don't work well with fine tuners. Should i remove the tuners? Also,if not, do I install them by the loop or the ball or with the little felt pad in the hole? Any experience on this. I don't want to goof up an expensive string set?

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If you keep the fine tuners and put the gut loops onto the tuner fork the string may break at that point as gut isn't designed to withstand that stress - take the G D and A off as suggested above. I've always just pushed the loop and felt washer through the hole and made sure it is well seated as far forward in the slot as it will go. These strings will take some time to stop stretching and may require frequent retuning, but they sound really good on many violins.

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I've just "reinstalled" a previously used set of Olives on to a violin whose "sound I'm trying to find." Now I've got a Bois d'Harmomie tailpiece with fine tuners on that violin, and I have had no trouble installing the Olive strings on it - I do use the felt washers to protect the gut from wear by direct contact with the tines (or "tynes") of the tuners.

Even though these strings have been previously used they are flat every time I open the case - and it has been 2 weeks now since I installed them. They will continue to change as long as I have them on the instrument - that is why synthetic and steel strings have found such favor. They will also change with room temperature and humidity and under hot stage lights they will tighten up throughout a concert, just the way bow hair does.

I used gut-core strings, first Eudoxa and later (when I could afford them) Olives, for many decades (DOminants never worked on that fiddle, so I had to wait for Pirastro's synthetics, and even then I waited another 10 years - or more). Gut strings impart a special sound to every instrument - and in my opinion they are sort of acceptable-sounding on any instrument, unlike some of the synthetics that satisfy a narrower range of instruments.

I consider myself fortunate not to have to depend on gut-core strings anymore to get "my sound" from most of my instruments (they are such a nuisance, especially for orchestra playing - because of frequent tuning requirements and the relative uselessness of the fine tuners)

Andy

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Andy, my recent re-experience with gut strings (Eudoxas) is similar to yours. I had them on from May til September, and I was still having to retune them very frequently. But I LOVED the sound! In your experience, which of the synthetics most closely resembles the sound of the gut strings? Or does it depend on the violin? Even my previous favorite (Infeld Blues) was a far cry from the colors available with the Eudoxas (and I know the Olives are even better -- and may try them for fun, now that we're into heating season here).

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I use the Eudoxas and like them alot! When practicing I always get the violin out of the case before dinner. When im fed the dhe dishes are done my strings and hands are ready to go! Some minor tuning is still needed though.

Also check yoyr bridge. The strech in the gutstrings sometimes messes with the angle of the bridge, and once that is happening stable tuning is impossible!

Wish you well!

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I have used Eudoxa and Olives on my old german fiddle. The sound was great, tuned a lot, but reponse was slow.

When Dominants came out I found the sound less rich and the G string weaker, but the response was much quicker

and they lasted and lasted. I have obligato on my Lord Wilton copy by Bellini which sound wonderful. I have not bee

tempted to try olives again. I tried Violino on the old Sweitzer and they were good for maybe two months and now

have Pirastro's newest Evah Pirazzi on it. IMHO strings at best improve the basic sound of the violin. The Sweitzer does not sound as good as the Bellini. I haven't tried the Evah's on the Bellini.

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DA,

I would have to say that in my opinion none of the synthetics really replicate gut overall in all its nuances - and to the extent that they do it depends on the violin (and the room). So that if you like the sound of Eudoxa or Olives on the violin, you will try to find a synthetic that resembles that sound - and it may well be different strings for different violins.

Instead, I have a sound that I like (or a range of sound) and want to hear as the player, and I will not settle until the violin I am playing is in that range of sound.

Right now, I have more violins that get into that sound range with Pirastro Evah Pirazzi strings than with any other, but one (possibly the best) of the violins is quite bad with Pirazzis (once they stretch to stability, it sounds wonderful when you first put them on) - its strings are definitely Pirastro Obligato, boy are they ever!

Andy

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