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Who is your favorite violinist?


ysaye
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quote:

Originally posted by Violina:
Originally posted by Kath:

The concert was in Tampere. He played Bach and as great as usual! In fact I know Pekka, we have some common friends.

Joo, olen suomalainen
smile.gif

Kath

Iiik, tunnet Pekan? No onneks olkoon! Varmaan hauska tyyppi:-) Ainakin mimiikasta ja liikkeistä päätellen;-)

Huomasin just että se on "Kokkisodassa" tänään, ehheh!

Violiina

Hei, jatketaanko keskustelua privaatimmin?! Löydät mun sähköpostiosoitteen tuolta profiilista. Joku kohta hermostuu suomenkieliseen keskusteluun, kun ei ymmärrä smile.gif

Kath

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Let's not forget the ever-lyrical Iona Brown (her Lark Ascending is absoultely fantastic) and Gidon Kremer, whom I consider the greatest violinist living today (he just doesn't have the popular agents working for him and he likes to do his own concerts rather than those the audience will like)

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Carroudus! Quite nice recording from 1901.

And in all honesty I think I would rate Niccolo Paganini quite highly, but I would like to hear a recording to make sure.

Myself? I think I would do the best job of all if I could only get over some technical problems. I'm literally burning to do it.

A word about Ilya Kaler. I think he is superficial. Technically perfect, and musically very exacting and expressive. But it ends there.

I could also second most of the others voted for in this discussion. Some more, some less. And each in different ways.

S.Taylor

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‘Carroudus’? Please elucidate, staylor! My sources have it that John Tiplady Carrodus, long-serving leader of the Royal Opera House orchestra (if that is whom you mean) died in 1895, too early to have made any recordings other than possibly a one-off phonograph cylinder. Perhaps this is a relative; orchestral players, then and later, seem to have been master-hands at training up a child in the way he should go (it would have been an ideal way, while the son was young and looking for experience, of ensuring that you always had a deputy lined up!)

My own votes: — Albert Sammons (principally for his 1929 Elgar Concerto with Wood, although I feel a strength and honesty in everything I have heard him do); Bronislaw Huberman (notably for the 1934 Beethoven Concerto with Szell – alas, I have broken the last disc of the set); and one mischievous one: Billy Reed, leader of the London Symphony Orchestra 1912-1933, for playing the obbligato to ‘Laudamus te’ (Bach, B minor Mass) on Albert Coates's 1929 recording EXACTLY as if he thought it was by Gounod. There is something perversely lovable in hearing a good musician (which he was) go so utterly, doggedly, sincerely wrong.

[This message has been edited by Oliver Mundy (edited 05-17-2000).]

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Carrodus.

I don't have the details here in front of me now, but it definately was quite a more recent recording-namely in 1901, and it was the son of whom you mentioned-I beleive.

Both father and son regularly played in front of Queen Victoria.

Maybe your book is an old edition!

Even that was probably only a one-off phonograph recording, and from that alone did I choose Carrodus.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a tendency to associate violinists with specific pieces, but here's a shot at it:

1. Heifetz, because the first time I ever listened to a full-length violin concerto happened to be by him. Didn't even know who he was at the time, but music's never been the same since...

2. Bell, because I'm more than a little obsessed with the Schumann Concerto (in a good way), and his recording of it is stupendous. In fact, it's this recording that, in my eyes, made him go from "great violinist" (one among many) to "Wow!" (musical idol status).

3. Chang, because her recording of the Vieuxtemps 5 made it an instant favorite, and-this doesn't happen all the time-I prefer it to Heifetz's oft-favored rendition.

Also-rans: Milstein; Hahn (great Barber); Oistrakh...and the list goes on...

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  • 4 weeks later...

I think Andrew Manze is a staggeringly good player. I've just finished listening to his recordings of Tartini, Biber, and Telemann, and think they all embody, to some degree or another, not only what I think the violin is capable of doing, but music in general. The Tartini Devil's Sonata recording is especially breathtaking--even though I know that piece well, I find myself surprised by where he takes it.

For more modern music, I haven't seen anybody mention Krysia Osostowicz, a really fine Polish / English violinist whose recordings of the Bartok solo sonata and the Faure sonatas are just beautiful. She is too, but I digress.

Departed violinists: Szeryng, hands down. I love his Bach sonatas and partitas.

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I now like the horribly underrated Jan Kubelik more than anyone else in recorded history - I just got his Biddulph 2-CD boxset.

That guy is the only violinist who goes right to my heart (I hear those Drdla Souvenir doublestops and go "Awwww").

He's also the only violinist that doesn't overmush the playing with vibrato.

Kubelik is the only guy who reminds me of myself.

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quote:

Originally posted by Todd French:

Let's not forget the ever-lyrical Iona Brown (her Lark Ascending is absoultely fantastic) and Gidon Kremer, whom I consider the greatest violinist living today (he just doesn't have the popular agents working for him and he likes to do his own concerts rather than those the audience will like)

Very surprised Kremer was mentioned only once or twice in this thread. Without a hesitation, I'd say he's my all-time favourite violinist.

For those of you on this board who haven't heard his recordings or seen him live I'd *highly* recommend checking out this guy.

I agree with Todd's assessment of Gidon's

lack of "popular acclaim". He's low-key, "non-sexy" etc. etc. but possesses the broadest pallete of colours imagineable when it comes to violin-playing.

His technique is impeccable too. Listen to his Bach Sonatas/Partitas, or Schubert's Fantasie in C.

Kremer is one of, if not the most recorded violinists of all-time.

Who else do I like?

Oistrakh, Grumiaux, Vengerov, HKV, Grappelli, O'Connor...

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It is no surprise that Kremer is NOT regarded as a sovereign. He is trichromatic: everything he plays is frenetically exhilariting, wispily eerie, or blandly plain.

In modern repertoire, this is not so noticeable. It is particularly noticeable in the standard warhorses, where the third color seems to predominate.

I heard a concert of Kremer playing the Tchaikovsky Concerto (bland); he then followed it with a searing rendition of a Schnittke piece (exciting and breathless, but not much else).

I want to be TOUCHED.

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Huang: I'm gonna repeat my question from above. Please answer it:

"posted 06-28-2000 06:49 AM

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HKV: What are Drdla doublestops?

Are they Do-re do-la doublestops?

Standing to be educated,

TR"

Thanks,

TR

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quote:

Originally posted by HuangKaiVun:

It is no surprise that Kremer is NOT regarded as a sovereign. He is trichromatic: everything he plays is frenetically exhilariting, wispily eerie, or blandly plain.

In modern repertoire, this is not so noticeable. It is particularly noticeable in the standard warhorses, where the third color seems to predominate.

...

I want to be TOUCHED.

I will agree that Kremer's playing can often be frenetically exhilariting and wispily eerie (I love the eerie moments; few can match that). However I can't accept that his playing is _ever blandly plain. Cerebral yes! Plain, never.

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