Jump to content

The most effective scale practice..


yiugn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Most effective scale system?

None! !

No, just kidding... I'm OD on Flesch-Sevcik too! I just couldn't resist the momentary dream of no scales!

But I think there really is no answer to your question, everyone is so individual that a practice for one may not be useful for another... perhaps here is where so much the teacher as the player has to find which way works best...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started out with Flesch, which is a good starting point. I eventually got away from it though because it didn't have much emphasis on 4 octave scales, and the chord scales take too long because of the way they are written. I recommend it but I would also say that it's a whole lot more time consuming than just playing the chord scales straightforward. Also, while one string scales are good, they are also very time consuming.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, there are many systems out there. I would say the best system would be that which helps you play IN TUNE! to be consistent about this issue is in my mind 'the most important' thing to keep in mind. Flesch, Barber, and Sevcik fall in the same style more or less. Ysaye's is very musical if you will. I have stopped using the Galamian system. All I use is his rhythm/bowing variants. In my mind his system of fingerings is very confusing, particularly in so far as his arpeggios. None of my pupils like it.

Remember, intonation, intonation

Pag

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I began with the Carl Flesch/Sevchik method, followed by Galamian, and now the Markov book of violin technique. Markov is about as hard as it gets..and it's very "old school." I mean, most people haven't even heard of it!

So anyhoo, those are just a couple suggestions. It's always great to learn new fingerings/patterns/whatever, but it's best to start with Flesch! ( :

GOOD LUCK! Always have fun with those scalies!

--Mazas

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Many years ago Gaylord Yost published a very fine set of scale studies. It consists of scales, broken intervals and arpeggios all on one string played with one finger, two fingers (in various combinations, three fingers and four fingers. Its a truly incredible way to develop shifting, intonation etc.

I have a copy but I would really like an original but it appears to be out of print.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bem Podgor,

Boy, that is a tough one to answer. Inner ear, that is the ability to hear perfect tuning is a pre-requisite, in my opinion, so one can be self sufficient in this regard. That is not to say that the help of a teacher who points out inaccurate tuning is also helpful. Even with a good ear I can safely say that all violinists were at some point or another guided by a teacher in this regard. Two recommendations I sometimes make are: practice without any vibrato what so ever and listen for the core of the pitch, the center which should be pure, it does have a certain ring to it, in fact it has a calming effect.

Hope this helps a bit

Pag

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on what you want. Sevcik op.3 is used a lot here, Flesh obviously (without double stops depending on ability). Also your own system practising one of each starting on each finger (not all in one day).

It's up to you, I personaly find one key very dull (after a decade of Flesch) so I like to do a mixture. If you're warming up, do different keys....if you're learning new things, one at a time might be better; remember one scale learned and played perfectly in tune will be better than a whole lot. You know this of course but boredom often upsets good intentions.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used Flesch for several years, but I have never systematically studied the double-stop scales. I hope I will do that pretty soon. My teacher used to make me study the same scale for months at a time-- the idea was not to move on until I got it right. But yes, the boredom and frustration thing was a problem. Plus the fact that I never got exposure to all the keys. Fortunately, the skill I learned by playing a scale in one key transfers easily into different keys. I felt like I had a much better grasp of the fingerboard when I made myself practice 4 scales per week this summer until I had learned every key somewhat decently, major and minor.

I also really like the Flesch arpeggios. Good for training your ear to recognize different chords and harmonic progressions (to an extent).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I feel that Sevcik's Op. 9 is a good book. It is very organized and makes sense. It covers all double stops. Simple, to the point, and easy on the eyes! If you can get an older edition I prefer that. The more modern editions tend to be cramped. Either way one should memorize them anyhow as one practices them. Memorization will happen since it is so logical

Warm regards,

Pag

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

When I studied in France for one year in the 1960s with Rene Benedetti, he provided me with a scale book by Nadaud and edited and revised by Bozza. I think it is terrific. Mine began to fall apart recently, and I was afraid I would never be able to replace it. However, I was able to do so at sheetmusicplus.com. If anyone is interested in it, that is where to get it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course Flesch is good, but it amazes me how many aspiring players turn to this before they have a permanent and efficient method for all the regular scales. Flesch is all well and good, but working on one key at a time should only be for those who can already play the main 'basic' scales very well. I rarely look at Flesch, prefering to spend my time covering simple 3 octaves g-f#, in a variety of bows/rhythms and of course arpeggios, dominant, dim, double stops. In one hour I can cover a lot more than getting bogged down with Flesch.

Only my opinion.

TD

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow this is an old thread. Just to add to everything that's been said, I practice scales differently than I used to. Instead of doing one key at a time (doing about 4 keys a day) I pick an interval, perhaps 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, octaves, fingerered octaves, or tenths and do all of the keys chromatically. The only exception is the arpeggios, which I do in the following sequence of keys: C, F, Bb, Eb, Ab, Db, F#, B, E, A, D, G. I think that this method is better because then your hand gets used to playing these intervals in all keys. I could go either way though, I still occasionally pick a few keys and do them individually, just to spice things up.

Amy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...