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Which strings on a new Italian Violin?


liljustin
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In general, when I finish a violin, I try to get the best of it (I`m also a player) and it envolves post/bridge adjustments as well as string choice. When I sell a violin it will go stringed with the strings I selected (in general Dominants with the E replaced by a Larsen).

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Experiment and find what works for yourself. My modern Italian (Tadioli) sounds wonderful with gut (though I don't like the pitch instability), and very good with Helicores, Infeld Blues, and good with many others. My favorite strings on my other violin were Corelli Alliances, but they're completely boring on my Tadioli.

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  • 4 months later...

During my recent round of viola shopping, which lasted a few months, I came across a few violas made only in the last decade. They were VERY loud and gutsy and in-your-face, and what made it worse was that they were strung up with Domminants - an OK string, don't get me wrong, but they are nearer to the cheeper end of things.

The one I purchased was made in 1989, and this instrument, like all new ones, I'd say, still needs time to be "played in."

I personally, lead the section in my orchestra, and still use quite a soft gague Eudoxa String. These are synthetic gut, but still go in and out of tune a lot.

Great sounding strings, Eudoxas, but they are quite expensive.

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Personally, I hate Dominant strings.

They are the cheapest real strings available over here, and you can tell.

They tend to go strange after a few weeks, and you really have to change them after a couple of months, which makes them much more expensive than the expensive strings, if you know what I mean.

And I've found this to hold true for the kid's violins as well as my own (and the children play a lot less than I do).

xan

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Wait, dont worry about a thin, everytings goin to be alright. Let the new violin settle for a bit. The sound will be changing anyway. Play lots. play loud, play doublestops loud. Give it 6 months to a year and then try any string you can. Its your violin and your sound, you will find whats best for you. Enjoy

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I don't normaly get involved in string threads but here's my pennies worth. I have a good few instruments and NONE have exactly the same string set-up. A new Violin usually sounds quite raw so go for a soft, warm string that gives you enthusiasm to play it. It will change in time and then you can experiment, as well as having someone do the bridge and soundpost. Very few off the cheap strings are soft (warm) in tone (IMHO) so buy a good set (Nice Pirastro probably) and don't tinker for a good long time. I use Dominants on my 'work' violin but would never put them on a new fiddle. I use Olive on my best Violin. I like the string which offers the opposite qualities to the instrument i.e. bright on a quiet instrument and mellow on a big-sounding instrument. That evens things out a bit.

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