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mirajewel

Virtuoso of the next milennium?

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Okay guys...here's new food for thought. who do you think will be the next virtusos of the new milennium. Any votes for....Maxim Vangerov...YES, OH YES!...MINE! I LOVE his passion and fire! And Sheer FUN! AND LOve for people and the violin! And technical expertise! Any votes for....let's see! Midori? Hillary Hahn? Leila? Go too! Guess which one!

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Yes your vote is a definate possibility, however Cory Surofftisk quite the Violin after brilliantly performing a professional level violin solo.... Now he is coming back to music.

=) PS- My Smile Faces Don't work

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There's bound to be another Heifetz born in the year 2000. (He was born in 1900 smile.gif)

However, since Perlman and Zuckerman are still alive, I pick them. People are living longer and longer these days!!!

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One for Maxim Vengarov here too!!!

On second thought, I'll put in a vote for Perlman too. He's the one who got me started anyway.

Kreisler13

P.S. I miss the subject lines where we could put a simple n/t and be done with it.

[This message has been edited by kreisler13 (edited 12-30-1999).]

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I vote for Joshua Bell, because of his fostering and respect for cross-over music. Just as Lord Menuhin reached across what once was deemed an impassable divide to record with Stephane Grappelli (sorry my keyboard doesn't do accents), so Bell has recorded Gershwin and Bluegrass/classical crossings with my pick for the next Pulitzer, Edgar Meyer.

Elaine

Norman,OK

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quote:

Originally posted by Paganini:

There's bound to be another Heifetz born in the year 2000. (He was born in 1900
smile.gif
)

However, since Perlman and Zuckerman are still alive, I pick them. People are living longer and longer these days!!!

I did not take them into consideration -- Perlman will sertainly dominate then! Viva virtuoso!

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I second the vote for Joshua Bell. Not only for his very tasteful foray outside the usual bounds of classical music, but also because of the warmth and elegance in his playing, which reaches into many hearts like no one else's playing can. (Not to mention mind-boggling technical virtuosity. smile.gif)

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G'day! Has anyone here heard the Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto? He has to be taken into consideration, especially as he is only in his 20s, and he he gives so much with his playing! If you haven't heard him, try to, it's worth it - especially the Sibelius Concerto. Cheers!

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Note to Tartini- At the bottom of posts there is a line tat says options. Read across. Is the box checked that says "Disable Similies in this Post"? That might be your problem. Oh, yes, I VOTE FOR PERLMAN!!!!!!

~Katie~ smile.gif

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Joshua Bell, hands down. The ultimate romantic soloist, the man who (gasp) almost makes crossover look good- heck, he makes any piece look good. I know of no other virtuoso who opens up so much when playing. Other violin virtuosos can play movingly, with power and emotion, but I don't feel like they bare their souls the way Josh does. That kind of direct communication to the listener, that willingness and ability to be so open with the audience- that's what blows my mind, and keeps me coming back to the concert hall and the record store to hear him. Keep it up, Josh.

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'Junior member', eh? Hmmph. Only because this is the first time I've been back in a long time, and whoopee, they go and change the board on me and I have to register again.

But for all you Vengerove fans: FYI, there is a Maxim Vengerov Club at Yahoo that needs a little life...

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I second my vote with OOOooooooo:-o for Hahn. I also agree that her Beethoven is one of a kind. Still Perlman has that "godlike" tone that I've heard from no one (including Heifetz, Bell, Grumiaux, and Milstein).

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Well, I vote for Pekka Kuusisto as well! He is a brilliant performer and his Sibelius concerto is marvellous, it is the best interpretation of it I have heard. Also his Vivaldi's Four Seasons are great! laugh.gif

Is there anyone out there who'd know him?

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Another vote for Maxim Vengerov!! I have seen him live several times and already have tickets for his 3 London (UK) concerts in 2000. He has such presence.

But I also have ultimate respect for Perlman.

Up and coming newcomer?? What about Ilia Gringolts (another Russian) only 17 (or is he 16).

And I would also cast votes for Shlomo Mintz (you must hear his Prokofiev sonatas)and Gidon Kremer, and...Oh I could go on forever!

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Perlman and Zukerman come first; the next age group, I'd say Mintz; violinists in their 30's, Joshua Bell. Vengerov, Shaham, Midori, Sarah Chang, and Hahn can duke it out. I'd put Vengerov and Midori at the top of that bunch, though. I'd put lots of faith in Bell for his maturity and because in a world where communication is getting better and better and everyone's done the standard repertoire, the next step (after proving oneself w/ the standards, of course) is cross-over or unique stuff (like Heifetz's and Kreisler's transcriptions or Kennedy's insanity).

-V

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Kennedy's insanity???

What does everyone else think. First time I've seen good ol' Nige get a mench on this board.

I've seen him in recital with Lynn Harrell on Cello and it was a night to remember, no off the wall stuff, mainly Bach, Ravel etc. But what do you think to his Hendrix stuff?

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In my opinion, not a single one of the players mentioned above will be a "virtuoso of the next millenium".

Though the physical talent obviously exists, the current conservatory milieu kills individualistic talent faster than poison. Listen to the radio - I dare any of you to recognize these folks (those of you who own CDs of particular works and happen to hear them by chance, wait till the next violin piece appears on the radio).

Unless somebody learns how to read classical scores (observe the pitiful studied distortion of the finale of the Tchaikovsky concerto with the A-F#-G-A C-D-E-A B-C-F#-G descending 16 notes that are commonly twisted into triplets), we'll continue to hear the butchering of scores that we've grown accustomed to.

And I'd like to hear Kreisler's "Liebeslied" played solidly, waltzingly, and plaintively, not like some colorless elephantine vibrato-uneven TV dinner.

Hopefully, either these players will grow up or new UNFAMILIAR ones will take their places.

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HuangKaiVun: Do you really know all of the violinists mentioned, so that you can say that none of them is 'the virtuoso of the next millennium'? I haven't heard them all, but my fav. boy Pekka Kuusisto, Maxim Vengerov, Itzhak Perlman and surely all the others are to my humble opinion all good in their own way. All of the three mentioned above have given me something extraordinary when listening to them. And surely all the violinists mentioned have given something to those who voted for them, so in a way, they're all Virtuosos of the next Millennium. To me they have given feelings, dreams, a glimpse of the unreachable. And that is the meaning of music, isn't it? smile.gif

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Ooh, good reply. I cannot argue with you.

I just like the old guys more.

The truth is that violin playing as we heard it may never be heard again.

But maybe the "new wave" of violinists (the ones you've mentioned, all of whom I've heard on various occasions) will change the face of violin playing for the better.

Until then, I'll listen to the "old guys" and hope that the younger guys will do their own thing.

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Aside from the fact that HuangKaiVun must be a raging perfectionist (and very negatively critical too) I have enjoyed reading the posts. I just received my Strad Magazine and thought I'd list "the stars of the next decade" as they phrase it, so here it goes:

Quartets:

Belcea Quartets

Aviv Quartets

Violin:

Mirijam Contzen

Ilya Gringolts

Laurent Korcia

Jennifer Koh

Alexander Sitkovetsky

Pekka Kuusisto

Lara St. John

Rachel Podger (Buroque Violin)

Viola:

Roland Glassi

Nokuthula Ngwenyama

Lawrence Power

Sarah-Jan Bradley

Cello:

Alice Neary

Daniel Lee

Jeremy Kurtz

Liwei Qin

Alisa Wellerstein

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